Interesting take on WC's past...

APL76

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Kinda both. If you look at the side to side turning in chum kil, are you using your hip or waist to lead the movement. Or if you look at a forward and backwards bending, kulo wing chun has a motion called wan wun yiu, which is an emergency technique involving controlled bending back with the force of the opponent's strike to recoil forwards with a counter.

Just read this. Its interesting, it seems, strangely enough that Ku Lo wing chun has more in common with Guangzhou wing chun than it does with Yip Man wing chun.
 
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wckf92

wckf92

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...kulo wing chun has a motion called wan wun yiu, which is an emergency technique involving controlled bending back with the force of the opponent's strike to recoil forwards with a counter.

Cool, thanks.
Yeah that's kinda what I was thinking about. We have that in Yip Man wing chun. There is a chinese term for it that I've forgotten. But in english I think it was something like "life after death" or whatever.
 

Eric_H

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I can completely get that your version might not do movements from snake and crane styles, but disagree that bending the body is only found in hung gar or Weng chun. When it is part of the Leung Jan kulo village curriculum. As Leung Jan revised his teaching into a more broken down and segmented style during this period, it seems likely that this was an advanced technique previously held back till later but he started teaching it earlier on and parallel.

In fairness my understanding is that it is generally considered an advanced technique only introduced after a student understands Jong, seven directions and Jung and Jing San principles.

I really wish there was less, if it's not in my lineage it's not wing chun.

It depends on your rubric for judging "wing chun or not." For me, it goes back to where we start - Siu Nim Tao, the little idea, the ability to focus. That starts from centerline. For me, no centerline = no wing chun. I've heard it referred to as shen fa, body method or framework, to me that's how I'm judging what falls into the WC bucket or not. It's perfectly OK for people to have different rubrics.

I imagine since what you're discussing is considered something advanced in your style, the chance of me seeing it is low, but I am intrigued by what you've posted. If there's anything about it I could read or watch, please do share.

As others have said, sometimes the best part of knowing the rules is knowing how and when to break them. I'm reminded of the part in Moy Yat Biu Gee where the body is bent, but that had been explained to me as a way to regain centerline when it was broken.
 
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