Incoming punch - counter with block - inside or outside?

lianxi

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I'm new here and a martial artist of 30 years and most of my fighting / sparring experience is temple fighting, fighting forms, etc. as opposed to real-world fighting or MMA. Recently there was some discussion regarding an MMA fight and how to deal with an incoming punch. I've never had training in boxing but apparently one technique is to side parry or push the incoming punch to the inside. For ex - facing the opponent, he or she throws a straight right at you - you come at their arm from the outside pushing it toward the centerline between you and then away. This is the opposite of using say a uechi circle block (wax on, wax off) and coming at the arm from the inside and directing it away from the centerline. Any thoughts on these two opposite approaches?
 
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wab25

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Well, they put you in different places, giving you different options and different vulnerabilities.

The wider the punch is (the more round) the harder it is to get to the outside... without some type of duck under. The straighter the punch is, the more you have to work to get to the inside of it. I am just lazy enough that most of the time, I will take the easier route. No point in using more energy than needed. But this means you need to understand and be proficient from inside and outside.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Any thoughts on these two opposite approaches?
Definition:

1. front door - space between your arms.
2. side door - space outside of your arms.

If you think that you are

1. better than your opponent, you block his punch from inside out and then enter his front door.

PRO: All your opponent's body is open for your attack.
CON: You have to deal with his other hand too.

2. not better than your opponent, you block his punch from outside in and then enter his side door.

PRO: You can use his leading arm to jam his own back arm. You may only need to deal with his leading arm.
CON: Your attacking area may be limited.
 
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lianxi

lianxi

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Well, they put you in different places, giving you different options and different vulnerabilities.

The wider the punch is (the more round) the harder it is to get to the outside... without some type of duck under. The straighter the punch is, the more you have to work to get to the inside of it. I am just lazy enough that most of the time, I will take the easier route. No point in using more energy than needed. But this means you need to understand and be proficient from inside and outside.

Great points and makes sense in the general way I was looking for - a rounder punch - maybe a right cross, would be harder to get to and parry from the outside, while a straighter punch might lend itself to the side parry. Thanks.
 
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lianxi

lianxi

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If you think that you are

1. better than your opponent, you block his punch from inside out and then enter his front door.

PRO: All your opponent's body is open for your attack.
CON: You have to deal with his other hand too.

2. not better than your opponent, you block his punch from outside in and then enter his side door.

PRO: You can use his leading arm to jam his own back arm. You may only need to deal with his leading arm.
CON: Your attacking area may be limited.
 

Danny T

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Parry to the inside and rotating the body creating the parry and as the opponent recovers his punch you counter rotate striking through is guard as he recovers his punch. You will be striking into what KFW calls the front door.
 
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lianxi

lianxi

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Thanks to all of you in advance for these responses and insights.
 
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lianxi

lianxi

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This is another helpful answer - the inside block puts YOU inside if you're confident enough to be in there! As a less aggressive and more defensive fighter, I like the idea of the side parry if it could be executed, turning the opponent away and dealing with his side, rather than being right in his center space.
 
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Buka

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And welcome to Martialtalk, Lianxi. :)
 
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lianxi

lianxi

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Thanks Buka. Um - what's the difference between a post and a thread here? Seems I created a thread, not sure if that's the ideal way to do it - ??
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Your opponent will respect you

- more if you can defeat him through his front door (you have shown your courage, for example a hip throw).
- less if you can only defeat him through his side door (you have not shown enough of your courage, for example a foot sweep).
 
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Ryan_

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Thanks Buka. Um - what's the difference between a post and a thread here? Seems I created a thread, not sure if that's the ideal way to do it - ??
A post is anything you post, including replies to threads.
A thread is the entire topic (meaning the entirety of "incoming punch - block with counter inside or outside")
 

marques

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Directing to the inside, makes every continuation a bit more difficult for the opponent and a counter a bit easier for me. I dont want my opponent face to face, but in a position where I can strike better.

I am sure the other way also works, just not the best way for me.
 
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marques

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This is another helpful answer - the inside block puts YOU inside if you're confident enough to be in there! As a less aggressive and more defensive fighter, I like the idea of the side parry if it could be executed, turning the opponent away and dealing with his side, rather than being right in his center space.
Thats about what I would advise. BUT sometimes you may want to be less predictable and still use both ways; sometimes there is only one way open (in competition, training, or self defence) and it forces you go to or across his centre space.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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The only one that I have is to use the block that is appropriate for the situation.
If my hands are

- up, I will use outward block to protect my center from inside out.
- down, I will use inward block to protect my center from outside in.

If my opponent attacks with

- hook or hay-maker, I will use outward block to protect my center from inside out.
- jab or cross, I will use inward block to protect my center from outside in.

I like to follow this plan and never change it. This way I can accumulate my experience.
 
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Martial D

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I'm new here and a martial artist of 30 years and most of my fighting / sparring experience is temple fighting, fighting forms, etc. as opposed to real-world fighting or MMA. Recently there was some discussion regarding an MMA fight and how to deal with an incoming punch. I've never had training in boxing but apparently one technique is to side parry or push the incoming punch to the inside. For ex - facing the opponent, he or she throws a straight right at you - you come at their arm from the outside pushing it toward the centerline between you and then away. This is the opposite of using say a uechi circle block (wax on, wax off) and coming at the arm from the inside and directing it away from the centerline. Any thoughts on these two opposite approaches?
Boxers/kickboxers/MMA guys tend to parry outside in on the mirror hand because it's quick and doesn't leave you open. If you parry inside out cross hand your head is there to be knocked off.
 

drop bear

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Rule of thumb if you go inside. (And I will just use the right hand.) You have to be striking back or you get clocked with the left.

A lot of this has to do with creating distance and reaction time.

So if my block pushes the right hand inwards. His left hand needs to travel further where my right hand is closer. (These are the hands ready to fire the next shot.)

Although if I push his right hand outside. His left hand is closer. But there is a trick to this because I can still cover his left hand side.

Now the opening is created on his right hand side. So I can block and punch with the same hand through that gap.

Works really neat with elbows.
 

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I'm new here and a martial artist of 30 years and most of my fighting / sparring experience is temple fighting, fighting forms, etc. as opposed to real-world fighting or MMA. Recently there was some discussion regarding an MMA fight and how to deal with an incoming punch. I've never had training in boxing but apparently one technique is to side parry or push the incoming punch to the inside. For ex - facing the opponent, he or she throws a straight right at you - you come at their arm from the outside pushing it toward the centerline between you and then away. This is the opposite of using say a uechi circle block (wax on, wax off) and coming at the arm from the inside and directing it away from the centerline. Any thoughts on these two opposite approaches?
My short answer: if you find yourself moving out, block them in. If you find yourself moving in, block out. When you train, you have to explore both, because there will be times you don't get to make the choice. Given a choice, I'd prefer to be on the outside - less opportunity for them, and I have plenty of tools to use.

There's more to it than that, but I'm short on time at the moment.
 
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