Gracie Kids Bullyproof

Andrew Green

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Here's the problem with being bullyproof, you can get in trouble for properly taking care of a bully.

Well, that is a conversation parents need to have with their kids. Yes, the child may get in trouble, but the long term results of getting in trouble vs the long term results of being a victim of bullying and not standing up for themselves has to be weighed. In some cases getting in trouble, hopefully with support of the parents is the favourable option when other options have proven ineffective.
 

PhotonGuy

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It even covers getting in trouble defending yourself. I've always told my kids they will not get in trouble at home for defending themselves or their friends from a bully, even if they do at school.
The problem is if they get in trouble with the law. And that can be worse than getting in trouble in school or at home.
 
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jezr74

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The problem is if they get in trouble with the law. And that can be worse than getting in trouble in school or at home.

You can get in trouble with Police and have done absolutely nothing. I'm talking 8 yo and 10 yo's, assuming my kids are not the bullies, I'd say follow the plan and they will be in a good position. If Police are involved so be it. Rather they defend themselves and have Police than be hurt by a bully and Police involved.
 

drop bear

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It is a tough one. I mean it is sometimes hard for a child to get the support they need to stop a constant harassment. An it can really grind people after a while.

I can see the appeal of just busting the kid in the face,taking the consequences on the chin and getting on with your life
 
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jezr74

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It is a tough one. I mean it is sometimes hard for a child to get the support they need to stop a constant harassment. An it can really grind people after a while.

I can see the appeal of just busting the kid in the face,taking the consequences on the chin and getting on with your life
No busting kids in the face in their program at all. Is about preparedness and control.
 

PhotonGuy

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You can get in trouble with Police and have done absolutely nothing. I'm talking 8 yo and 10 yo's, assuming my kids are not the bullies, I'd say follow the plan and they will be in a good position. If Police are involved so be it. Rather they defend themselves and have Police than be hurt by a bully and Police involved.

That is one of the problems with our system, how a person can get in trouble when they've done nothing wrong. Or, for that matter, how there is much debate over what is right and wrong and the system might call something wrong even when you might think its right.

Anyway, at 8 and 10 your children no doubt might have to deal with some bullying but they will get older and while they might be able to handle bullying better at that point, the bullying itself can come to new levels. It reaches new levels in high school and college, particularly college where people can really go wild. And while it might be unlikely for an 8 or 10 year old to get in trouble with the law for a physical altercation, in college its a different story. At that point the law comes into play much more in such situations and no doubt your children will go to college eventually.
 
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jezr74

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I have been doing this with my daughter for a while now, we just get on the ground and play fight when we have time and when she is up for it.

Yesterday on the school ground, my daughter is eight, I picker her up from school and she was all excited. Some boys had pushed around her and her classmate over a ball incident. They apparently kicked and pushed her and her friend around.

I asked her why she was excited about that and she recapped how she was able to clinch "Oliver Ts" arm in close and force his chest down, which then allowed for a sweep after he tried to pin her to the ground. She then used our practiced scenarios and pushed off on his face then elbow then knees to get our of his reach and move along out of the fight, dragging her friend along.

Proud dad moment, well she was so excited about it she is fired up to go and get formal lessons now so we start next week, but I have to as well apparently.

So it has paid off three months later. Just hearing her recite how she was trying to put him in his place with out hurting him too much was great.
 

Chrisoro

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I'm thinking of using this program from about age four when I have children, in order to build a good grappling foundation, and perhaps enroll the kid into a children's judo class later on. As the Bully Proof program is essentially Gracie Combatives minus the choking techniques (which is VERY understandable), I believe that the focus on base, positional control and basic submissions, all of which are allowed in Judo(since the chokes isn't included), will be a great base and provide a good advantage in Judo ne-waza when he/she starts doing Judo. The Bully Proof/combatives takedowns would probably not be that usefull, considering that morote gari were made illegal in competition in 2009 I believe, and the rest of the takedowns, including the ko soto gari variant they teach, is based on attaining a type clinch which would be extremely hard to get in a Judo setting.

I'm not going to teach my kid any Hapkido until far later btw.(if they are still interested), as the nature of many of our techniques, just as with the chokes of BJJ/Judo, are disasters waiting to happen if used irresponsibly in the schoolyard. Judo/BJJ is super effective in itself, and in either case, I generally don't want my kid to be able to do anything worse submission wise than popping an elbow, until mature enough to handle more destructive techniques.
 
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kuniggety

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all of which are allowed in Judo(since the chokes isn't included), will be a great base and provide a good advantage in Judo ne-waza when he/she starts doing Judo.

I am not arguing the intent/spirit of your post. I think it is good. I just wanted to point out that the chokes of BJJ are actually part of Judo's newaza too. I was kind of amazed when I opened a judo manual not that long ago, flipped through the chokes, and saw that it was probably 75% of the chokes that I have learned in BJJ and included one that I hadn't learned yet in BJJ.
 

Drose427

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I am not arguing the intent/spirit of your post. I think it is good. I just wanted to point out that the chokes of BJJ are actually part of Judo's newaza too. I was kind of amazed when I opened a judo manual not that long ago, flipped through the chokes, and saw that it was probably 75% of the chokes that I have learned in BJJ and included one that I hadn't learned yet in BJJ.

Wel......

Maeda was a Judo guy.....

I mean where else would you think the techs in BJJ came from?
 

kuniggety

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Wel......

Maeda was a Judo guy.....

I mean where else would you think the techs in BJJ came from?

I know the origins of BJJ. It was more of amazement in how close BJJ has stayed to the original judo curriculum for chokes. It has diverged more in other areas.
 

Chrisoro

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I am not arguing the intent/spirit of your post. I think it is good. I just wanted to point out that the chokes of BJJ are actually part of Judo's newaza too. I was kind of amazed when I opened a judo manual not that long ago, flipped through the chokes, and saw that it was probably 75% of the chokes that I have learned in BJJ and included one that I hadn't learned yet in BJJ.

You misunderstood what I was saying. As I have previously trained and competed in judo for almost three years, I was certainly not saying that Judo does not include chokes, or that you cannot use them in Judo competition. What I was saying was that since the Gracie Bullyproof technical curriculum is essentially Gracie Combatives, exept that it do not include any of the chokes from Gracie Combatives, of which one is the guiliotine choke that is _not_ allowed in Judo competition, Gracie Bullyproof does not contain any submissions that aren´t allowed in Judo.

I am fully aware that rear naked choke and triangle choke(the two other chokes taught in the Gracie Combatives program) is techniques that is also present in Judo under the names hadaka jime and senkaku jime.
 

Drose427

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I know the origins of BJJ. It was more of amazement in how close BJJ has stayed to the original judo curriculum for chokes. It has diverged more in other areas.

Well the body only moves so many ways
(I think thats the first time I've said that for grappling and not discussing commonalities in unrelated striking styles)

Im sure the gracies/machados would have loved to diverged a bit more, but we cant change anatomy
 

Hanzou

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Wel......

Maeda was a Judo guy.....

I mean where else would you think the techs in BJJ came from?

Well there's some wrestling and street fighting in there as well.

Maeda was a Judo guy, but during his travels around the world, he picked up a lot of stuff from other sources.
 
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