Dux Ryu

lll000000lll

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i want to learn more about this style, but i can seem to find anywhere in my homestate of connecticut to train. does anyone know more info about this style??? i've also been reading alot of the web from this site if anyone else is interested. http://www.duxryu.8m.com
 

Kreth

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lll000000lll said:
i want to learn more about this style, but i can seem to find anywhere in my homestate of connecticut to train. does anyone know more info about this style??? i've also been reading alot of the web from this site if anyone else is interested. http://www.duxryu.8m.com
If you've never trained in it, then why is it in your profile? :idunno:
To answer your question, Dux Ryu is not a traditional ninjutsu system. Try the search function. It works, really... :)
 
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lll000000lll

lll000000lll

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i've been trying to teach myself thru websites, ive been doing some BOB drills but its not the same as working with a good instructor, or anyone learning the style for that matter.
 

Bigshadow

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lll000000lll said:
i've been trying to teach myself thru websites, ive been doing some BOB drills but its not the same as working with a good instructor, or anyone learning the style for that matter.

Dux Ryu is not traditional ninjutsu as Jeff said. I would encourage you to read more about Ninjutsu before making a commitment to following the path your on. It is important to find an instructor and train. Trying to use a website for training is a complete waste of your time. If you are sincere, you will find what you are looking for.
 

evenflow1121

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Frank Dux was the founder of this system, and it is ,considered, by some, to be the first American Ninjutsu System, I am not too knowledged about Dux Ryu, or Frank Dux, except for the movie Blood Sport and the book THe Secret Man, but you should do some research on the different styles of ninjutsu if you are serious about training this type of art.
 

Blindside

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Even the title of this thread gives me bad images of JCVD in Bloodsport.

yeeeeuch

Lamont
 

stone_dragone

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I understand that training in any specific art is limited geographically due to a lack of instructors in any given art, but I agree with the previous statements that without formal training with an instructor, you will really do yourself more harm than good. In some cases, some serious harm.

Take some of the time that you are on the internet and search for a dojo near you. Reading a website (including this one) and trying to act like a ninja will result in some very unpleasant lessons.

Btw, "Bloodsport" was just a movie...entertainment...albeit a movie that's in my DVD player right now.

Best of luck with your search and welcome to MT!
 

Edmund BlackAdder

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I stand between the Dorkness and the Not Bright
Mr. Dux is not held in high regard here if past reading is any indication. Nor are his offshoots.

If you are looking for ninjutsu, avoid the mail order, the video training, and look for someone with authentic ties to Japan.
And who can spell it correctly. (1 i only please)


*Poof*
 

MJS

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lll000000lll said:
i want to learn more about this style, but i can seem to find anywhere in my homestate of connecticut to train. does anyone know more info about this style??? i've also been reading alot of the web from this site if anyone else is interested. http://www.duxryu.8m.com

You may want to check this out:
http://www.winjutsu.com/winlinks.html

Greg Kowalski owns that Dojo that is found in CT. Greg is a great person and has a good group of people at his school. My suggestion would be to contact him, if you're seriously interested in training. IMHO, you'll find that you'll get much better training from a live, qualified instructor, rather than trying to learn from the web or a dvd.

Mike
 
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lll000000lll

lll000000lll

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thanx for all of the feedback, it is much appreciated, i will definatly look into the Ninjitsu school in CT.
 

Rook

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lll000000lll said:
i want to learn more about this style, but i can seem to find anywhere in my homestate of connecticut to train. does anyone know more info about this style??? i've also been reading alot of the web from this site if anyone else is interested. http://www.duxryu.8m.com

Dux Ryu ninjitsu was founded by Frank Dux. Dux claimed to have learned ninjitsu (note: the more commonly accepted spelling is ninjutsu but Dux prefers ninjitsu for unknown reasons) from one Mr. Tanaka. To date, no one has found evidence that this person existed or that Mr. Dux had contact with him. In any case, Dux also claimed to have supplemented his ninjitsu with the martial arts he encountered and learned from. This may explain the presense of components that look suspiciously like BJJ and other popular arts.

Mr. Dux claims a classified military record that includes top-secret actions in Vietnam and load of awards. His official record indicates he was an enlisted soldier serving as a motorpool operator (read: parked cars for people on military bases). It is unclear why no addenum noting additional classified material was on his official record except that he likely made up such stories. He also has appeared in public wearing fake medals and combat ribbons, as well as awards from both the Marine Core and Army which should not be simultaneously be worn even if legitimate.

Additionally, and most prominently, Mr. Dux claims to have won several secret martial arts contests refered to as "Kumites" put on by a Triad named the Black Dragons. Although Triad activity is heavily monitered and investigated, to date no one has found evidence of the existance of a Black Dragon Triad and the term Kumite itself is a Japanese, rather than Chinese term.

When a Navy SEAL interviewed him asking his opinions about hand to hand combat training, he used the opportunity to claim to be an official advisor for the SEALs and also claimed to have created a system refered to as "FASST" for their use although it was apparently never implemented in any form. He is, in fact, quoted briefly in a SEAL's document, but there is no evidence of anything more than that.

You will find that Dux Ryu is a modern eclectic system of martial arts that changes/evolves periodically.

To be clear, I am myself a karate practitioner who has never been affiliated with any ninja or neo-ninja group nor likely will be. I have no dog in this fight... just trying to help you out in your search for information about Mr. Dux and his organization.
 

Cryozombie

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I *heart* Frank Dux.

:inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove:​
 

Cruentus

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No defender of dux here; just a question and slight hijack:

I have heard more then once Westerners making a big deal regarding the English spelling of Ninjutsu (being with the "u" instead of the "i"). I have had people tell me that one is basically ignorant if they don't spell the word "correctly" in English.

No offense, but isn't this a bit silly, as the word "Ninjutsu" would be officially spelled in Japan in Nihongo anyway, with the use of Characters (Kanji/Hiragana/Katakana) rather then the Roman (or "English") alphabet?

From someone on the sidelines here, any hype about the "official" spelling of the word "Ninjutsu" seems like a silly westerner wanna-be thing to me...

But maybe there is a dynamic I'm missing.

Thoughts?
 

Don Roley

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Tulisan said:
No defender of dux here; just a question and slight hijack:

I have heard more then once Westerners making a big deal regarding the English spelling of Ninjutsu (being with the "u" instead of the "i"). I have had people tell me that one is basically ignorant if they don't spell the word "correctly" in English.

No offense, but isn't this a bit silly, as the word "Ninjutsu" would be officially spelled in Japan in Nihongo anyway, with the use of Characters (Kanji/Hiragana/Katakana) rather then the Roman (or "English") alphabet?

From someone on the sidelines here, any hype about the "official" spelling of the word "Ninjutsu" seems like a silly westerner wanna-be thing to me...

But maybe there is a dynamic I'm missing.

Thoughts?

As someone who speaks Japanese, I will give my reason for saying why "jitsu" is wrong and not just another way of saying the same thing.

There are two main systems for writing Japanese. The national and Hepbourne system. I hate the national systems with a passion but it is taught in schools here. In that system, you write sounds like "tsu" as "tu" and a sound that would sound like "chee" in English is written "chi" or "ti" in the two systems. So in this case, either would be considered acceptable, "ninjutsu" or "ninjutu." A Japanese looking at the word and translating it back into Japanese would get it correct.

But a Japanese looking at "ninjitsu" would translate it back just like that and not as the word is originally in Japanese. That could cause some problems and has caused quite a bit of mirth in my experience. It is kind of like a Japanese trying to say "election" but writing it like they would in katakana with no difference between L and R- and that has happened before.

So for the sake of getting it correct and recognizable to a Japanese speaker, I would think you would want to differentiate between Ji and Ju as much as possible.
 

Cryozombie

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Tulisan said:
No defender of dux here; just a question and slight hijack:

I have heard more then once Westerners making a big deal regarding the English spelling of Ninjutsu (being with the "u" instead of the "i"). I have had people tell me that one is basically ignorant if they don't spell the word "correctly" in English.

No offense, but isn't this a bit silly, as the word "Ninjutsu" would be officially spelled in Japan in Nihongo anyway, with the use of Characters (Kanji/Hiragana/Katakana) rather then the Roman (or "English") alphabet?

From someone on the sidelines here, any hype about the "official" spelling of the word "Ninjutsu" seems like a silly westerner wanna-be thing to me...

But maybe there is a dynamic I'm missing.

Thoughts?

If I could please respond in a manner totaly opposite of what Don said, even tho he is surely right... but this is my take.

U cud rite liek ths I c it all the time now c you understand the werdz n evrything but r u sure its the best way?

Ninjutsu/Ninjitsu reads the same way to me. To me, One way is "english" and the other way is "I cant spell simple words like you, see, and are".
 

Cruentus

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Don Roley said:
As someone who speaks Japanese, I will give my reason for saying why "jitsu" is wrong and not just another way of saying the same thing.

There are two main systems for writing Japanese. The national and Hepbourne system. I hate the national systems with a passion but it is taught in schools here. In that system, you write sounds like "tsu" as "tu" and a sound that would sound like "chee" in English is written "chi" or "ti" in the two systems. So in this case, either would be considered acceptable, "ninjutsu" or "ninjutu." A Japanese looking at the word and translating it back into Japanese would get it correct.

But a Japanese looking at "ninjitsu" would translate it back just like that and not as the word is originally in Japanese. That could cause some problems and has caused quite a bit of mirth in my experience. It is kind of like a Japanese trying to say "election" but writing it like they would in katakana with no difference between L and R- and that has happened before.

So for the sake of getting it correct and recognizable to a Japanese speaker, I would think you would want to differentiate between Ji and Ju as much as possible.

Ah...now that makes a lot of sense. So it isn't so much the Japanese to English that matters because pronunciation should be the same, it is when you back translate it to Japanese that you end up with mistakes.

Thanks for clearing that one up, Don.

Thread Hijack over.... ;)
 

Brian R. VanCise

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That is one of the very nice things here on MartialTalk is that we have a link with people living and training in Japan that also speak and read the language fluently. That certainly helps to clear up any confusion.

Now if we can just get Kizaru to come on here more and post some of his wisdom! :asian:

Don, the next time I am in Japan I will definately look you up for some training as well as a cold one. (I'm buying) My plans were ruined this year but I am all set for next summer!

Brian R. VanCise
www.instinctiveresponsetraining.com
 
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