Questions From Someone Interested In Learning About Ninjutsu

Caesar

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Hello,

My name's Dante. I'm 22 and live in North Carolina. I've posted a few times on other sections of Martial Talk, but this is my first time here. I've been reading over the previous posts about Ninjutsu and I've gotten some ideas about some things to look into. I do not practice any martial arts as of yet. I mostly do boxing and weight lifting. I do want to join a local martial arts school. I think around here we have Tae Kwon Do, Karate, and Judo. That's mostly it. I did have a few questions though about Ninjutsu.

What are the best recommendations as far as books, websites, and magazines for someone who wants to get an accurate assessment of Ninjutsu, especially a newcomer, and not the Hollywood idea of a Ninja?

Also did Ninjas practice any form of religion? Like Buddhism, etc. If it was Buddhism, what branch? Did Ninjutsu influence their practice of their religion?

I'm stop there. I look forward to hearing from anyone. Thanks.

Dante
 

Tengu6

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Any books by Masaaki Hatsumi would be good, but to get an accurate perspective you need to train. Go to www.winjutsu.com and click the yellow pages, there are plenty of places to train in NC.

Yes, the ninja were essentially buddhist and shinto due to the culture but it is not a requirement, most likely not even taught, and certainly has nothing o do with learning Ninjutsu except for insight into techniques and historical info.

Enjoy your path!

Markk Bush
 

cloud

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It truly depends on the kind of training experience you would like. If you like a more straight forward no-nonsense self-defense system, I strongly suggest Toshindo school. If you can take your time to explore the warrior way of martial art and like to learn things in a traditional way, I recommend Genbukan school, or Bujinkan school if Genbukan is limited by location. Toshindo based emphasis on how to deal with the curret world, wide swing punches and clubs while Genbukan and Bujinkan teaches you from traditional stands point (how you deal with launch punches and swords) by which you can then apply it to the real world.

All are NOT based on speed and strength but more so on timing (when to move) and distancing (when to move). All style of ninjutsu involves some Mikkyo, Shinto or Zen teaching which can be applied to enhance your life regardless of your religious background.

The best way to see what is there to offer is to go to the school and see if it is for you, just becuase each instructors have different personalities and spins on teaching method. A great martial artist from great system doesn't always imply great teacher; some only works with naturals and give as little as they can to other simply because he is also naturals so consequently does not know how to make it work outside his personal environment. As someone who have done martial before, I strongly recommend that you choose the instructor before the system. He is the one who will be teaching you, not the system.
 

Brian R. VanCise

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Definately check out the books by Masaki Hatsumi the current Soke of the Bujinkan. His last three books : The Way of the Ninja, Advanced Stick Fighting and Japanese Sword Fighting are simply fantastic. Here is a link where you can view them: http://www.ninjutsu.com/store/home.php?cat=152
You can also find them at Barnes and Noble, Border's, etc.


If you have a Bujinkan dojo around go and experience a class and see if it is for you. Bujinkan schools follow Soke Hatsumi's teachings and really it is a very creative and evolving way to learn.

Brian R. VanCise
www.instinctiveresponsetraining.com
 
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