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stephen

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So, in this case, the tactical space would mean that he avoided the shots, if they in fact were even close enough to make contact, but put himself in a position to reach the other guys foot?

Sure. I think though, that this might also be a great example of the changing of roles that can happen when one tries to 'put on' or 'use' a technique.

Which segues well into:

MJS said:
Upon first read, I took this as him saying dont go into any technique, but instead just move. So if the person punches once, and does nothing else, then you move and do nothing else. If he punches 2 times, then you move twice, nothing else. For me, again, as a Non Buj guy reading this, that is the way *I* took it, but it seems that there're meanings that I'm either not understanding or just missing.

Now, if the article said, "Move and then, depending on what your opponent did, you then, from your more advantageous position, throw a counter, whatever that may be.

'Move' can mean anything. So there may be a punch, kick, lock, or whatever that is the proper 'movement' in order to take the safe space.

The thing that I take as important from this is that it's key to not allow yourself to become the attacker, because then you can be pulled into a bad position.

I think this is also related to how we view sparring vs randori and the relative merits of either in the Bujinkan.

This, to me, is one of the strengths of the Bujinkan and pretty much the primary reason I train: all of these things are related and form a coherent whole. Training, to me, seems to be holographic in nature, that is the whole is also reflected in each of the parts.
 
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MJS

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Sure. I think though, that this might also be a great example of the changing of roles that can happen when one tries to 'put on' or 'use' a technique.

Which segues well into:



'Move' can mean anything. So there may be a punch, kick, lock, or whatever that is the proper 'movement' in order to take the safe space.

The thing that I take as important from this is that it's key to not allow yourself to become the attacker, because then you can be pulled into a bad position.

I think this is also related to how we view sparring vs randori and the relative merits of either in the Bujinkan.

This, to me, is one of the strengths of the Bujinkan and pretty much the primary reason I train: all of these things are related and form a coherent whole. Training, to me, seems to be holographic in nature, that is the whole is also reflected in each of the parts.

Thanks for the great reply! :) Its good discussion like this, that helps Non X-Kan folks, like myself, grasp a better understanding of your art.

Mike
 

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Good points and this is why I suggested that we should have an alternative, such as engaging, instead of always avoiding.

Amen to that, I was emphasizing your points on that with my own. The whole avoidance by itself was not realistic in my view.
 

sgtmac_46

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That's what separates a GOOD plan from a BAD plan..........one of you anonymously knows what i'm talking about.....Blah Blah.... ;)
 
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