Creative ways to prepare for sparring at home

PK_Tricky

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I am learning Ti Chi Chuan, Wing Chun, and Taekwondo. Currently I do not have money for classes. I found that employing Wing Chun (blocking, palm strikes, grabbing) while tossing a stool around really helps with muscle memory and strength. I have also used a mattress as a punching bag with some success. Taking my coat on and off using Taekwondo blocking techniques helps alot too. Kicking the crap out of a few comforters (keeping them from hitting the ground) works well with Taekwondo kicks. Additionally, Ti Chi Chuan works supprisingly well with double Bo Rods (although i did accidently peg myself in my face, and gave me a black eye for a week and a half lol). Anyway, what other creative ways have you all found work well with objects found in a typical home setting. Thanks in advance.
 

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There's no good way to sugar coat this.
You're not learning any of those arts. You're watching videos, fumbling around, and hurting yourself. You really cannot learn them from videos.
What works best in the home setting is practicing what you've been taught in class.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Currently I do not have money for classes.
Foundation, foundation, and still foundation. Nobody can progress in MA without strong foundation. Without a teacher, you won't know what foundation is.

Human body is like 3 separate springs. Without training, each and every spring will be compressed and released independently. With training, all 3 springs can be compressed at the same time, and also be released at the same time. To achieve that "body unification" is the foundation building task.
 
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Jared Traveler

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I am learning Ti Chi Chuan, Wing Chun, and Taekwondo. Currently I do not have money for classes. I found that employing Wing Chun (blocking, palm strikes, grabbing) while tossing a stool around really helps with muscle memory and strength. I have also used a mattress as a punching bag with some success. Taking my coat on and off using Taekwondo blocking techniques helps alot too. Kicking the crap out of a few comforters (keeping them from hitting the ground) works well with Taekwondo kicks. Additionally, Ti Chi Chuan works supprisingly well with double Bo Rods (although i did accidently peg myself in my face, and gave me a black eye for a week and a half lol). Anyway, what other creative ways have you all found work well with objects found in a typical home setting. Thanks in advance.
I'm glad to hear you are having fun. Sometimes that's enough to keep you on your martial arts journey. If you truly don't have money for classes, then you simply don't.

In that case I would recommend asking people you know if anyone who has training is interested in giving you lessons at no cost. Sometimes people are very excited about doing that, but don't have any potential students.

If that doesn't happen, keep exploring and learning on your own. You certainly aren't getting the quality training at a gym, but the internet is a huge resources none the less. You certainly can obtain some skills at self-defense, as opposed to sitting on the couch and doing nothing. Great job.
 

JowGaWolf

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Train the boring stuff (basics and foundations) then when you think you want to get creative then train the basic stuff harder. There's no need to get creative.

I'm in the gym now and I just finished doing an hour of basic training. Jabs, hooks, and footwork. It may sound boring, but all of my advanced techniques grows from the strength of my basics. Don't try to make martial arts special. Focus on the basics. Then when you have the cash then take a class for formal teaching.

The only creative stuff zi use in martial arts is conditioning, but even that is within reason and with a focus on what I want to accomplish.
 

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I am learning Ti Chi Chuan, Wing Chun, and Taekwondo. Currently I do not have money for classes. I found that employing Wing Chun (blocking, palm strikes, grabbing) while tossing a stool around really helps with muscle memory and strength. I have also used a mattress as a punching bag with some success. Taking my coat on and off using Taekwondo blocking techniques helps alot too. Kicking the crap out of a few comforters (keeping them from hitting the ground) works well with Taekwondo kicks. Additionally, Ti Chi Chuan works supprisingly well with double Bo Rods (although i did accidently peg myself in my face, and gave me a black eye for a week and a half lol). Anyway, what other creative ways have you all found work well with objects found in a typical home setting. Thanks in advance.
Well done on doing something, rather than watching too much TV, playing video games and scrolling through unsociable media! Ultimately having an experienced teacher giving you intensive feedback on you movements will be invaluable, but from what Ive experienced, this seldom happens even if youre in a real class!

I was a great fan of shadow boxing: throwing your punches, kicks and blocks into the air as though you were fighting. Videoing these will allow for post-training analysis圬o be critical of your performance though - its important to be honest with yourself.
 

Holmejr

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Cheers to you for being motivated enough to train on your own. There are plenty of beginner type videos on YouTube and other resources. As you get past the very basics, youll miss the subtleties without a qualified instructors sharp eye. If youre in the US, On the app NextDoor, I would post and invitation to train. A couple years ago I found a good student that way. The training was really for me (honing my teaching skills) but he got the benefit of learning. I did not charge him. He had to move due to business. Anyway, you might get lucky, yer never know.
 
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PK_Tricky

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Well done on doing something, rather than watching too much TV, playing video games and scrolling through unsociable media! Ultimately having an experienced teacher giving you intensive feedback on you movements will be invaluable, but from what Ive experienced, this seldom happens even if youre in a real class!

I was a great fan of shadow boxing: throwing your punches, kicks and blocks into the air as though you were fighting. Videoing these will allow for post-training analysis圬o be critical of your performance though - its important to be honest with yourself.
Thank you, that means alot actually. I agree that there is no substition for in-person training, and I am saving up to get to that point. In the mean time, I am gaining flexibility as well as a feel for how the body moves natually. Sometimes I get creative after I have memorized a few new forms and put them to the test. For me its all about how to "feel" how each form relates to how the body moves, and get used to quickly moving around. It also helps me test my focus with a tiny bit of (what feels like) danger, if that makes any sense. Anyway, thank you for not just jumping to the self-defeating "Take classes or do nothing at all" approach.
 
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PK_Tricky

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Cheers to you for being motivated enough to train on your own. There are plenty of beginner type videos on YouTube and other resources. As you get past the very basics, youll miss the subtleties without a qualified instructors sharp eye. If youre in the US, On the app NextDoor, I would post and invitation to train. A couple years ago I found a good student that way. The training was really for me (honing my teaching skills) but he got the benefit of learning. I did not charge him. He had to move due to business. Anyway, you might get lucky, yer never know.
Well getting started was no easy task, lol. Some days it takes every ounce of effort to get started, but I won't give up. One of the important points in any martial art (as far as I know) is getting to know your body and its response to movement, as well as how to use each muscle group efficiently in tandem with the rest of your muscles. I am sortof rotating between different martial arts to gain a foundation and fully understand each concept while fully understanding its foundational elements. Some really dont jive with me, others fit me like a glove. Better than just waiting for the opportunity to train in an actual dojo. The way I look at it, if you feel inspired, go for it. Thank you for understanding my point of view rather than simply shooting me down. Anyway, I hope you have a good new year Holmeir!
Kindest Regards - PK
 
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PK_Tricky

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Foundation, foundation, and still foundation. Nobody can progress in MA without strong foundation. Without a teacher, you won't know what foundation is.

Human body is like 3 separate springs. Without training, each and every spring will be compressed and released independently. With training, all 3 springs can be compressed at the same time, and also be released at the same time. To achieve that "body unification" is the foundation building task.
Thank you, that means alot actually. I agree that there is no substition for in-person training, and I am saving up to get to that point. In the mean time, I am gaining flexibility as well as a feel for how the body moves natually. Sometimes I get creative after I have memorized a few new forms and put them to the test. For me its all about how to "feel" how each form relates to how the body moves, and get used to quickly moving around. It also helps me test my focus with a tiny bit of (what feels like) danger, if that makes any sense. Anyway, thank you for not just jumping to the self-defeating "Take classes or do nothing at all" approach.
Cheers to you for being motivated enough to train on your own. There are plenty of beginner type videos on YouTube and other resources. As you get past the very basics, youll miss the subtleties without a qualified instructors sharp eye. If youre in the US, On the app NextDoor, I would post and invitation to train. A couple years ago I found a good student that way. The training was really for me (honing my teaching skills) but he got the benefit of learning. I did not charge him. He had to move due to business. Anyway, you might get lucky, yer never k
Cheers to you for being motivated enough to train on your own. There are plenty of beginner type videos on YouTube and other resources. As you get past the very basics, youll miss the subtleties without a qualified instructors sharp eye. If youre in the US, On the app NextDoor, I would post and invitation to train. A couple years ago I found a good student that way. The training was really for me (honing my teaching skills) but he got the benefit of learning. I did not charge him. He had to move due to business. Anyway, you might get lucky, yer never know.

Train the boring stuff (basics and foundations) then when you think you want to get creative then train the basic stuff harder. There's no need to get creative.

I'm in the gym now and I just finished doing an hour of basic training. Jabs, hooks, and footwork. It may sound boring, but all of my advanced techniques grows from the strength of my basics. Don't try to make martial arts special. Focus on the basics. Then when you have the cash then take a class for formal teaching.

The only creative stuff zi use in martial arts is conditioning, but even that is within reason and with a focus on what I want to accomplish.
I agree that the foundational elements (the boring ones, lol) are foundational for a reason. It seems that each martial art is based on a foundation of some sort, and the basic forms are part of that.
 
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PK_Tricky

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Cheers to you for being motivated enough to train on your own. There are plenty of beginner type videos on YouTube and other resources. As you get past the very basics, youll miss the subtleties without a qualified instructors sharp eye. If youre in the US, On the app NextDoor, I would post and invitation to train. A couple years ago I found a good student that way. The training was really for me (honing my teaching skills) but he got the benefit of learning. I did not charge him. He had to move due to business. Anyway, you might get lucky, yer never know.
Thanks for giving me some credit for my effort. It seems sometimes the hardest thing to do is feel accomplished about something, at least, for me anyway. I cant wait to train in an actual gym. That being said, I must find out what I am capable of before I can make an educated guess as to exactly what martial art will be best for me. I will check out the NextDoor app, hopefully I can find some people that are as driven as me. I have gotten very good at a wide variety of skillsets, and in a way, they do translate. Thank you for the advice Holmejr!
 

JowGaWolf

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You can always try to coordinate your punch with your leading foot landing either on a punching bag or solo drill.
I'm always surprised with how many people can't do this. Even my brother had difficulty with this. I assumed that they would teach this at his gym but it doesn't look like it. I'm startto think that it's not the norm to punch like that.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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I'm always surprised with how many people can't do this. Even my brother had difficulty with this. I assumed that they would teach this at his gym but it doesn't look like it. I'm startto think that it's not the norm to punch like that.
When I punch on my heavy bag, I like to hear the sound of my leading foot landing and punching landing as one blast.

To coordinate "hand with foot" is the easiest part of the training. To coordinate "elbow with knee", and "shoulder with hip" are much harder.

I always assume that when I punch, I have to step forward. I'll never assume that when I punch, I am standing still. This will brain wash myself that I have to keep moving in a fight.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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More complicate body coordination training can be:

- Left arm parry down, right arm comb hair, and left foot forward landing (at the same time).
- Left arm wrap, right hand push, right leg cut (at the same time).

Without training, these 6 body parts moves can be messy. With training, these 6 body parts moves can be as clean as just 2 moves.
 

JowGaWolf

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Instead of punching a mattress see if you can get a stand alone punching bag. If you can't get that then see if you can hang a tennis ball from the ceiling.

Use the tennis ball to punch the gaps when the tennis ball swings. Imagine a target is on the other side that you are trying to hit before the tennis ball swings back and hits your arms. Move around the tennis ball as it swings. Avoid getting hit by it.
 

drop bear

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People are going to say classes with instructors is better than you training yourself at home.

But you have to understand that it is rhe individual that makes a talented martial artist and not the system.

So the more you train, no matter what you are training the better you will get.

That is just science.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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So the more you train, no matter what you are training the better you will get.

That is just science.
If you freeze your body and only punch with your arms, no matter how many years of training that you may have put in, you are still doing wrong. The problem is after you have developed a bad habbit, it's very difficult to fix it.

Correct way to train:



Wrong way to train:

 
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isshinryuronin

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all of my advanced techniques grows from the strength of my basics
So true. Many "advanced" techniques are simply basic strikes/blocks done with footwork, evasion and angles, or applying basic biomechanical principles in unexpected ways. I can do a very basic jab or reverse punch in a very "advanced" way. After many years of study, I find the distinction between "basic" and "advanced" to be quite nebulous. When that line disappears completely, I will feel I have mastered something.
 

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When I first enrolled on a Karate course at the tender age of 12yrs, at a municipally run leisure centre, I had to wait for 3 months before the course started. Rather than just passively waiting I went to the library and found a book on Karate, (Know Karate-Do by Bryn Williams) and studied it cover to cover. As it recommended, I started doing press ups (against a wall, then as I got stronger, a mantelpiece then a fireplace hearth and then ground on my knuckles). I did stretching exercises-hamstrings, leg adductors, punched at lit candles to snuff out the flame with the air pressure of my fist, bought a makiwara and hit it (ouch!.and I damaged the plaster on the wall as it was resting on the mantlepiece-my parents were not best pleased), I put dry chickpeas on a small container and thrust my knife hand into it (ouch) and I feel certain all this, if nothing else, set me up psychologically for that first day of Wado Ryu Karate!

Your enthusiasm will take you far!
 
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