Circle of Doom

Touch Of Death

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Originally posted by ProfessorKenpo
I read charge and that could refer to many things, didn't know what to take it as. I've never interpreted a shuffle as a charge but I suppose it could be taken that way but we don't teach it for a shuffle kick. I can't figure why you can't or won't do it but I'm certainly not leaving it out of what I teach, I find lots of value in that particular technique. In fact, I've found value in all of them so far, and no, I'm not a grandmaster, just a professor (one big bar + one little one), and you are what rank again?


Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
My problem with this tech is the spinning hook kick. I use the first two moves in sparring all the time however the whole spinnig hook kick thing is somthing I've never been responsible for. That is,my instructor wouldn't be upset if I opted for becoming neutral and maybe using a back nuckle strike instead of the turnning your back on your opponent thing. According to the Martial talk ranking system I am a blue belt and will remain so until I figure out how to put an avatar under my name or until I blather on to Brown.
 
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ProfessorKenpo

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Originally posted by Touch'O'Death
My problem with this tech is the spinning hook kick. I use the first two moves in sparring all the time however the whole spinnig hook kick thing is somthing I've never been responsible for. That is,my instructor wouldn't be upset if I opted for becoming neutral and maybe using a back nuckle strike instead of the turnning your back on your opponent thing. According to the Martial talk ranking system I am a blue belt and will remain so until I figure out how to put an avatar under my name or until I blather on to Brown.

OK.

Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
 
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dcence

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From my perspective, it doesn't make a lot of sense to block the guys leg one direction, only to move it back across your body in the other direction. The guys line of attack is straight at you. I don't see logic in blocking the kick inward, then after you have deflected the kick off the line of attack, moving it back across your body. It is a little like first blocking a punch with an inward block, only to move it back across your body with an outward punch.

Additionally, the guy has to be a pretty slow kicker or extremely cooperative to allow you to first block it in, hook it, and then take it the other direction.

I prefer to think of this as a formulation solution to the "what-if" the kick is not a low kick, but turns into a high kick. You originally block inward thinking you are covering the lower zones against a front kick to the groin, but the kick goes high and you have to adjust -- so you end up blocking outward.

Derek Ence
 
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feintem

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Don't block use the hands as a frame. when they attack fade reverse bow and with the rotation crack some nuts with a heal hook. Then when the poor guy bends over hook him in the face with the left.





Respect,Loyalty,Blood,and Honor

-Michael-
 
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FiveSwords

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I prefer to think of this as a formulation solution to the "what-if" the kick is not a low kick, but turns into a high kick.

I agree. Intellectual Depature is a much cleaner technique for this kind of kick, and I think it's a shame that it's a lost techinuque. ID and CoD really should be taught together as a what-if situation.

Then you can throw in ID, CoD, and Rotating Destruction and have yourself a progressive what-if party. :D

(Plus it would make a sweet Tekken combo) :cool:
 

Michael Billings

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Intellectual into Circle into Rotating. I like it!!! I have played with Intellectual into Circle, but did not get any further with it. I have kept Intellectual Departure and Spreading Branch in my curriculum very much on purpose.

Intellectual is a great technique to use sparring and is a Point of Origin response to a kick when your hands are down. Deflecting Hammer is "there" when you need it if your hands are above your waist.

Very nice indeed.
-MB
 
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FiveSwords

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I have kept Intellectual Departure and Spreading Branch in my curriculum very much on purpose.

We do those and Agressive Twins as kind of an afterthought or as the "lost yellow techniques".

Spreading Branch is rough for beginners, especially kids, so I can see why they axed it. The other two are simple and efficient, though, so I don't know why they were dropped. I think the ID block is great and I use it all the time in sparring, but I can't think of any other techniques have it if you don't teach ID.
 
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ProfessorKenpo

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Originally posted by FiveSwords
I agree. Intellectual Depature is a much cleaner technique for this kind of kick, and I think it's a shame that it's a lost techinuque. ID and CoD really should be taught together as a what-if situation.

Then you can throw in ID, CoD, and Rotating Destruction and have yourself a progressive what-if party. :D

(Plus it would make a sweet Tekken combo) :cool:

I don't know who's training you right now but it sounds like they have their stuff in one sock. I was just teaching these very scenarios with these techniques about a month ago.

Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
 
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FiveSwords

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...but it sounds like they have their stuff in one sock.

Forgive me for asking a silly question, but what does this mean? I've never heard that phrase before. :confused:
 
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ProfessorKenpo

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Originally posted by FiveSwords
Forgive me for asking a silly question, but what does this mean? I've never heard that phrase before. :confused:

They have their s**t together, or stuff in one sock to be nice. You appear to have a good knowledge of what Kenpo is from your post.

Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
 
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FiveSwords

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Right...ok, that makes sense now. :D

Many thanks. :asian: My instructor studied under Mr. Planas, so he has a good base for what this stuff is really about. I just recently got my first black, however, so I'm only beginning to realize just how little I know.
 

psi_radar

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I just got here so I need to catch up!

1) I was taught that Circle of Doom was the result of a bait, sort of like showing your ribs in Retreating Pendulum. In CID, you hold your guard low (facilitating the block) while leaving the head as a big, shiny, candy-like target that hopefully draws in your opponent. Is that how you guys learned it?

2) One cool way of doing Intellectual Departure is to use a right shin block rather than a right low inward block, then use the block as the first part of the left (hop) spin kick --decreases the amount of motion needed. Great for sparring.

3) This is the first time I've heard of Spreading Branches. What is its origin, and how does it go?
 
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FiveSwords

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Hey, psi! Welcome to the board.

1. I never intentionally leave my guard down, whether I'm trying to bait or not. I used to do just that all the time, but I went to a seminar with Russel Animazou (sp?) and he proceeded to smack me in the face before I even knew he moved. He said no one, not even him, is fast enough to guard against a rush if your hands are down.

That said, we practice the technique as though you just did a right downward block or something that put you in that position unintentionally.

2. Interesting idea with the shin block, but I think it would lose the effect of stretching him out with the inward downward block. How do you do ID? It sounds like it may be a bit different from what we do.

3. Spreading Branch, from what I've heard, is the original version of Captured Twigs, but they discovered that kids had problems doing this technique on larger opponents and changed it. Here's how I learned it:
  1. Pin the opponent's hands, step out left into a horse, right hammer the groin (just like CT).
  2. Step to 7:30 with your right leg to buckle opponent's left leg as you right backknuckle to the face.
  3. Grab his head with both hands and deliver a right knee to his face as you drive towards 1:30.
  4. As you land, circle your right arm around and deliver a right downward elbow strike to the spine.
    [/list=1]

    Hope that helps! :)
 

Michael Billings

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The back knuckle is an insert, I use it, but for lower students, it tends to knock the head away from the knee, and they have trouble bring the body back down. Of course if they inserted the sleeper constriction and subsequent neck-break, the back fist does not matter.

-MB
 

psi_radar

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Thanks for the welcome and description of Spreading Branch, FiveSwords. I've never been a big fan of Captured Twigs, so I might try that on and see how it fits.

ID is not a part of our "official" curriculum, meaning I learned it, but more as a footnote or sparring technique. My understanding of the technique goes like so:

From a natural stance, avoid a committed front kick coming in around waist level by stepping back with the left to a right neutral bow, and deflect the kick with an inward palm-in low block.

As the opponent's leg is now passing you, turn shoulders to 6:00 into a reverse cat, then blast a right back kick into the opponent's solar-plexus/groin.

Is that the base you learned?

The shin-block version is definitely not textbook Kenpo (sorry if I made it sound that way), it was presented as more of an informal alternative, but I always thought it maintained the same principles. The right shin block doesn't halt the kick, it still allows your opponent to get pretty deep, and opens their width to accept the hop -left-spin-back kick. I find it works best in sparring, after you've discovered your opponent's rhythm and can anticipate their front kick. That way you can really just rip it as a kick, with your shin just happening to knock their leg in the beginning.
 
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FiveSwords

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From a natural stance, avoid a committed front kick coming in around waist level by stepping back with the left to a right neutral bow, and deflect the kick with an inward palm-in low block.

As the opponent's leg is now passing you, turn shoulders to 6:00 into a reverse cat, then blast a right back kick into the opponent's solar-plexus/groin.

Yeah, I think we're on the same page. I was just a bit perplexed. :D

To finish, we plant the foot that just kicked and torque into a right back knuckle strike, then drag the left foot up and right side kick the knee.
 
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