Bullshido Video Analyses

Hot Lunch

3rd Black Belt
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All throughout Youtube and Facebook, I'm getting some questionable videos. I wanted to start a thread where we can post videos and discuss the effectiveness of the technique.

I'll start.

This one, I think, is not only questionable, but unethical. It's hapkido instructors demonstrating how to resist arrest. Specifically, how to escape being handcuffed.


When it comes to ways of escaping being handcuffed, I'm convinced that if you can think of it, that cop has likely already seen it a dozen times, and is ready for it. And I don't think that what's in this video is an exception.
 
All throughout Youtube and Facebook, I'm getting some questionable videos. I wanted to start a thread where we can post videos and discuss the effectiveness of the technique.

I'll start.

This one, I think, is not only questionable, but unethical. It's hapkido instructors demonstrating how to resist arrest. Specifically, how to escape being handcuffed.


When it comes to ways of escaping being handcuffed, I'm convinced that if you can think of it, that cop has likely already seen it a dozen times, and is ready for it. And I don't think that what's in this video is an exception.
I feel like I lost brain cells from watching that garbage. First, that's not how cops apply handcuffs, and second, hahahaha leaping in the air. Silly.
 
First, that's not how cops apply handcuffs ...
Yeah. Even I know that. If the officer is gripping both of the suspect's wrists, how can he apply handcuffs?
... and if the wrist-holding is meant to represent the handcuffs, then, uh, the suspect is already in handcuffs and can't escape them.

Wow. This is so stupid.
 
What they said.
Like a fair number of these scenarios, the situation seems contrived and incredibly unlikely to ever arise.

Hospitals always have ridiculous "self defense" programs they require staff to attend. In one, the instructor wanted to show us what to do if someone kicked us. In the ankle. I've never seen anyone try to kick someone in the ankle in anger.
 
What they said.
Like a fair number of these scenarios, the situation seems contrived and incredibly unlikely to ever arise.

Hospitals always have ridiculous "self defense" programs they require staff to attend. In one, the instructor wanted to show us what to do if someone kicked us. In the ankle. I've never seen anyone try to kick someone in the ankle in anger.

Went through one of those Hospital SD programs....I was security there, it given by a nun. Never knew it took 5 people to take one person down before. on on each arm, one for each leg, and one to cradle their head so they didn't hit their head when they fell

She taught a way to get out of a from behind choke hold that got you behind the person with an arm lock. Then push the person away..... at that point I had all I could stands and I couldn't stands no more... I said.. "Sister, if I get a violent person in an arm lock like that I'm riding that sucker all the way to the wall, I'm sure the heck not going to let him go to attack me again" And yes, I did actually say heck.

And don't get me started on the SD for a hair grab they taught
 
Went through one of those Hospital SD programs....I was security there, it given by a nun. Never knew it took 5 people to take one person down before. on on each arm, one for each leg, and one to cradle their head so they didn't hit their head when they fell

She taught a way to get out of a from behind choke hold that got you behind the person with an arm lock. Then push the person away..... at that point I had all I could stands and I couldn't stands no more... I said.. "Sister, if I get a violent person in an arm lock like that I'm riding that sucker all the way to the wall, I'm sure the heck not going to let him go to attack me again" And yes, I did actually say heck.

And don't get me started on the SD for a hair grab they taught
I love it when they ask for volunteers. :D

One asked for a volunteer so he could show how to deal with a headlock. Big buff guy, clearly a body builder sort. I'm old and worn out. I asked him "how seriously do you want me to do this?" and he said "do it like you mean it.

So...ok... RNC... he starts pushing his chin down (which could be helpful if I'd done an air choke) and said "Drop your chin, so you can br....."

That was as far as he got.

Put him down. He woke up. He laughed, at least, and said "Well, just shows that no defense is perfect."

There were plenty of things I refused to even practice in the class. I just said "Nope. I am never going to do that. That will get me hurt."
 
Went through one of those Hospital SD programs....I was security there, it given by a nun. Never knew it took 5 people to take one person down before. on on each arm, one for each leg, and one to cradle their head so they didn't hit their head when they fell

She taught a way to get out of a from behind choke hold that got you behind the person with an arm lock. Then push the person away..... at that point I had all I could stands and I couldn't stands no more... I said.. "Sister, if I get a violent person in an arm lock like that I'm riding that sucker all the way to the wall, I'm sure the heck not going to let him go to attack me again" And yes, I did actually say heck.

And don't get me started on the SD for a hair grab they taught
I never understood drop bear's hatred for industry training until I did NY's hospital SD program (likely same curriculum as yours). I did a write up on it a couple years ago. But man, is it bad.

It's one of those that I think is more dangerous than helpful, as it makes people think they're better than they actually am, and they act with false confidence.
 
I never understood drop bear's hatred for industry training until I did NY's hospital SD program (likely same curriculum as yours). I did a write up on it a couple years ago. But man, is it bad.

It's one of those that I think is more dangerous than helpful, as it makes people think they're better than they actually am, and they act with false confidence.
The basic problem is that nothing whatsoever in those programs is intended to actually make the staff safer. Some of it is actively dangerous. But it let's the hospital say you were trained and that obviously you didn't do what you were taught. The programs protect the facility and nothing else.
 
I love it when they ask for volunteers. :D

One asked for a volunteer so he could show how to deal with a headlock. Big buff guy, clearly a body builder sort. I'm old and worn out. I asked him "how seriously do you want me to do this?" and he said "do it like you mean it.

So...ok... RNC... he starts pushing his chin down (which could be helpful if I'd done an air choke) and said "Drop your chin, so you can br....."

That was as far as he got.

Put him down. He woke up. He laughed, at least, and said "Well, just shows that no defense is perfect."

There were plenty of things I refused to even practice in the class. I just said "Nope. I am never going to do that. That will get me hurt."
Love it!
 
I worked at the county jail and the SD they taught consisted of leg kicks and covering up - no strikes or holds. Mostly surviving till more guys came.
Never knew it took 5 people to take one person down before. on on each arm, one for each leg,
Similar to our tactical response. Strength in numbers. No technique.
 
I have looked the other footages/reels from Ancient Art: Kuk Sool Kwan Hapkido and I am really confused. Some of them looks legit some of the looks very risky, some of them looks like good ideas with bad performance, some like bad ideas with good performance, sme are just dumb.
The reel "Hapkido Collar Grab Entry" is must see.
 
I worked at the county jail and the SD they taught consisted of leg kicks and covering up - no strikes or holds. Mostly surviving till more guys came.

Similar to our tactical response. Strength in numbers. No technique.

No this was all geared towards restraining while not hurting the patient. Even though he may be violent, it assumed that the patient would not be all that resitent
 
What they said.
Like a fair number of these scenarios, the situation seems contrived and incredibly unlikely to ever arise.

Hospitals always have ridiculous "self defense" programs they require staff to attend. In one, the instructor wanted to show us what to do if someone kicked us. In the ankle. I've never seen anyone try to kick someone in the ankle in anger.
I've used it on purpose. Had on steal toe boots and dropped the guy. Got a REALLY nice solid kick that hit right on his ankle bone.

BUT, I wholeheartedly agree that 99.9% of the time teachers/nurses etc. that may have need for self-defense, it is most likely a small child that is going to be kicking them in the ankle and time should be better spent on dealing with actual high percentage attacks.
 
There's certainly plenty of bad technique being taught out there. Rather than just pointing and laughing, it might be more instructive to break down how this technique might have been created, what it gets right, and how it went wrong.

So ... the idea behind the technique being shown is actually a useful principle to understand. Leaving aside for a moment the faulty understanding of cuffing technique, the person doing the demo has their arms bent behind them, with upward pressure being applied to their wrists at right angles to their upper arms. This gives the person holding them a mechanical advantage. Not a huge advantage, given that the arms aren't fully bent, but enough that the defender probably can't force their arms straight without possessing superior strength. If only one arm was held, then the defender could rotate their body to change the angle of force, but with both arms being held, that isn't an option. So by jumping upwards, the defender is able to straighten their arm without fighting directly against the attacker's force. Once their arm is straight, then the attacker's upwards force is now travelling along the length of the arm rather than coming in at right angles to a bent arm and offers no mechanical advantage, making it easy to break free. This concept - moving in an unrestricted direction to change the angle of a limb so that it isn't vulnerable to control - is very useful in escaping submissions.

No, where it went wrong ...

Firstly, there's the lack of understanding of how cuffing procedure works. I've never worked in law enforcement, so I'm certainly no expert. But the way the attacker is holding the defender in this video doesn't seem particularly conducive to effectively handcuffing either a compliant or a resisting suspect. (Here, I started to speculate, then decided it would be smarter to just search YouTube for instruction in proper LEO handcuffing methods. Sure enough, none of them show anything like what the attacker using in the video and the demonstrated technique would be irrelevant or ineffective for any of them.)

Secondly, even if we leave aside the stated "resisting arrest" scenario, the demo fails to take into account what could happen if the attacker doesn't just stand there statically. If as the defender jumps upwards, the attacker raises their wrists to follow, then gravity will put the defender in a much deeper double hammerlock position and possibly injure them as they come back down.

Thirdly, putting aside any arguments about the ethics of resisting arrest, the real world practicalities are that it rarely leads to improved outcomes for the person resisting. Possible results can range anywhere from being dogpiled and handcuffed in a much more painful way all the way to being shot dead. (In fairness, the video only shows a clip of the technique without explanation. It's possible that the instructor was actually just trying to demo a technique for escaping a poorly executed double hammerlock and whoever posted it to Facebook added the "resist arrest" headline as clickbait.)

So, what do we have? We have a legitimately useful physical principle (probably learned via techniques which have actually been properly tested) being creatively applied to a novel context, but without any attempt to investigate the realities of that particular situation or testing to see what flaws the new technique might have against a resisting opponent. That describes ... well, rather a lot of the bad techniques I see being taught by instructors who have some legitimate skills in other areas.
 

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