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chrispillertkd

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Puunui - I don't have a clue where you could find someone, or even a book to teach kimchi making. It is made differently in different areas of Korea, and in summer and winter. Also, there are many different kinds of kimchi. If you only say kimchi, people understand cabbage kimchi. But there is kimchi made from other vegetables as well, such as turnip and cucumber.

Any Korean cook book will have several kim chi recipes in it, the more well known cabbage as well as the other types you've mentioned. The recipes can be a bit time intensive, I've found, but easy enough to follow. amazon.com or borders.com will turn up a number of such books.

Pax,

Chris
 

shima

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Congratulations to you both, it's always great when family members can test together :)
 

Carol

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Congrats to you both!
 

mastercole

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I think you may be talking about Tuenjang Chigae. A lot of Tuenjang in a soup with whatever else the cook feels like putting in.

Seems to be an American tradition to have Korean food after a test.

I like that spelling, Tuenjang, it sounds out good. I had some Tuenjang Jigae in Pusan a few months back, it may be the best I have had so far and a stuffed duck dinner in Chamsil that reminded me of Thanksgiving was super excellent. The food in Korea is always impressive, I sometimes feel like Korea is the food place to go in Asia. Even in really small villages, the food is excellent.

Basically Tuenjang is the Korean version of Japanese Miso, I find Miso to be lighter and sweeter in flavor, but excellent. Both come from fermented soybeans, called Nato in Japanese. I love Nato and have been eating it for years. I find that if freaks out most Americans. I like it in a makki roll, or my favorite now is just scoop it onto sticky rice and eat that with some salted baked whole fish.

Asking for Nato is my test to see if the sushi bar is a good choice or not.
Now it's getting hard to get. My sushi chef told me that is because the the tragedy in Japan.
 

ralphmcpherson

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Seems to be an American tradition to have Korean food after a test.

I like that spelling, Tuenjang, it sounds out good. I had some Tuenjang Jigae in Pusan a few months back, it may be the best I have had so far and a stuffed duck dinner in Chamsil that reminded me of Thanksgiving was super excellent. The food in Korea is always impressive, I sometimes feel like Korea is the food place to go in Asia. Even in really small villages, the food is excellent.

Basically Tuenjang is the Korean version of Japanese Miso, I find Miso to be lighter and sweeter in flavor, but excellent. Both come from fermented soybeans, called Nato in Japanese. I love Nato and have been eating it for years. I find that if freaks out most Americans. I like it in a makki roll, or my favorite now is just scoop it onto sticky rice and eat that with some salted baked whole fish.

Asking for Nato is my test to see if the sushi bar is a good choice or not.
Now it's getting hard to get. My sushi chef told me that is because the the tragedy in Japan.
We go out after every grading for korean food. There are some excellent korean restaurants in my area and a big feed of korean with a big crew from tkd is always a good night. These days my wife cooks quite a bit of korean so we have it regularly at home too.
 

puunui

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I love Nato and have been eating it for years. I find that if freaks out most Americans. I like it in a makki roll, or my favorite now is just scoop it onto sticky rice and eat that with some salted baked whole fish.

I like natto too, but no one else really does. I always order Natto maki whenever eating sushi. You can still find natto at the Japanese markets here. I better stock up, if it's going low because of the tsunami. I usually have some in the refrigerator at any given time.
 

miguksaram

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Seems to be an American tradition to have Korean food after a test.

I like that spelling, Tuenjang, it sounds out good. I had some Tuenjang Jigae in Pusan a few months back, it may be the best I have had so far and a stuffed duck dinner in Chamsil that reminded me of Thanksgiving was super excellent. The food in Korea is always impressive, I sometimes feel like Korea is the food place to go in Asia. Even in really small villages, the food is excellent.

In about 10 days I will be in the midst of Dwejangchigae and other fresh Korean food at my mother-in-law's house in Jeonju, a town infamous for its food, especially dosot bimbimbap.
 

SahBumNimRush

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Congrats, and what kind of Kimchi did you have? Of the 5 or 6 kinds I've had, I LOVE them all.. . My wife's favorite is still the white kimchi (which is my least favorite, because I love the heat!)
 

mastercole

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In about 10 days I will be in the midst of Dwejangchigae and other fresh Korean food at my mother-in-law's house in Jeonju, a town infamous for its food, especially dosot bimbimbap.

Oh yes, Jeonju Bibimbap, famous! Are you going to the Muju festival?

Jajangmyeong in China Town (Choongkuk-si?) is good too.
 

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