Bag work and faster combinations.

EdwardA

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These two videos show what I did over the years to get fast combinations.
This video is some bag training.


...and the next video is what I got from it. Realize, I didn't do this for sparing or for the ring.

 
What do you do in case of defense? There should be a variation of defense and attack.
I think this man should have control while punching.
 
This is only about some bag work, and does not represent anything else. I train a hundred different ways...if not more.

I will add though, on the back side of these circular punches you can grab your opponents arms if needed....or rake a knee, lots of things. Step on their foot....

It's just one of many exercises.
 
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I wanted to add to this, a more detailed explanation.

I weigh 140 lbs. When I was training to the max, still only 156 lbs. I made quite an effort to focus on some things to deal with guys I'd run across that were typically 4 inches taller, out weighed me by 50 to 100 lbs., and muscular. You cannot get tangled up with guys like that. You have to get inside fast and weigh-lay them. Still, this is a punching exercise and doesn't show what can be done with the feet and knees at the same time.

Yes, you have to get past their primary reach. I either take their center line from their jab on the way in, or slightly side-step it. If they're throwing something more like a round-house I can generally beat them to the punch without blocking, or if needed, knock it down on the way in. That's a bit slower tho. It depends on how fast they are.
 
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Reminds me of Rolling Fist. It is a similar technique from Pinan shodan/nidan.

What style do you practice.

I started in '69. My instructor trained with Ip Man in Hong Kong, then moved to California at 17 around '65 or '66, and trained with Ed Parker. I met him in another small city near LA in '69 at 14. He taught me his own hybrid system....not unusual back then. He completely customized my training to suit my abilities, but somewhat based on both Wing Chun and Kenpo. I added Tai Chi structure based on the 108 move set, a little JKD...and what I found applicable from a number of other systems. He insisted I find the things that are suited to me and make it my own. Since '76, I'm self taught based on the early structures I learned, what I've studied that made sense to me...haha and a lot of street fighting.

A couple examples of how he taught me:

A lot of one on one sparring with him exlporing a lot of different techniques.

He didn't teach me any sets...katas. He told me to create them myself and he would correct them.

He also wanted me to do spontaneous sets fighting 2 to 4 opponents.

He didn't want to teach me moves. He wanted me to learn how to move. I'm not saying that's right or wrong, it was just what he thought was right for me.
 
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These two videos show what I did over the years to get fast combinations.
This video is some bag training.


...and the next video is what I got from it. Realize, I didn't do this for sparing or for the ring.

I always like how martial arts starts off with something that looks"boring" and "useless" then after doing the "boring and useless" the results show the value in the stuff that is often thought of as boring and useless.

Much respect for sharing your video and putting your training out there.
1. It's not easy to do that because it puts you in the spotlight for all sorts of criticisms
2. Not everything can do it. Some people have their hands tied behind their back from teachers who do not want student to share on video.

Repetition is one of the most important yet THE MOST BORING thing about martial arts. At least to me.

Thanks for sharing the video
 
I always like how martial arts starts off with something that looks"boring" and "useless" then after doing the "boring and useless" the results show the value in the stuff that is often thought of as boring and useless.

Much respect for sharing your video and putting your training out there.
1. It's not easy to do that because it puts you in the spotlight for all sorts of criticisms
2. Not everything can do it. Some people have their hands tied behind their back from teachers who do not want student to share on video.

Repetition is one of the most important yet THE MOST BORING thing about martial arts. At least to me.

Thanks for sharing the video
Well said and I am complete agreement with your statement.
 
I started in '69. My instructor trained with Ip Man in Hong Kong, then moved to California at 17 around '65 or '66, and trained with Ed Parker. I met him in another small city near LA in '69 at 14. He taught me his own hybrid system....not unusual back then. He completely customized my training to suit my abilities, but somewhat based on both Wing Chun and Kenpo. I added Tai Chi structure based on the 108 move set, a little JKD...and what I found applicable from a number of other systems. He insisted I find the things that are suited to me and make it my own. Since '76, I'm self taught based on the early structures I learned, what I've studied that made sense to me...haha and a lot of street fighting.

A couple examples of how he taught me:

A lot of one on one sparring with him exlporing a lot of different techniques.

He didn't teach me any sets...katas. He told me to create them myself and he would correct them.

He also wanted me to do spontaneous sets fighting 2 to 4 opponents.

He didn't want to teach me moves. He wanted me to learn how to move. I'm not saying that's right or wrong, it was just what he thought was right for me.
Nice, I love your history. I trained a little bit of Ed Parker Kenpo out of Great Falls Montana, I don't remember the guys name though. And, some Chinese Kempo there as well.
 
I always like how martial arts starts off with something that looks"boring" and "useless" then after doing the "boring and useless" the results show the value in the stuff that is often thought of as boring and useless.

Much respect for sharing your video and putting your training out there.
1. It's not easy to do that because it puts you in the spotlight for all sorts of criticisms
2. Not everything can do it. Some people have their hands tied behind their back from teachers who do not want student to share on video.

Repetition is one of the most important yet THE MOST BORING thing about martial arts. At least to me.

Thanks for sharing the video

I like the repetition...the patterns I preserve. I find a rhythm....with the bag moving from the contact and interesting things happen. In the zone it's not so much a reputation, but something else.
 
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Edward I like your style, you kind of remind me of one of my old instructors, he was a 7thdan kenpo man from Hawaii who also practiced wing chun and used centerline theory. He was the best martial artist I've ever met, and he had a similar style to the combos you demonstrated. Keep up the good work brother. Actually you should be the one telling me to keep up the work haha cuz you been training since 69 I've only been training since 96' on and off.
 

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