Are these goals really attainable for the average Joe?

cfr

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I put this in the general section because I want unbiased opinions, not just hose of JKD practitioners. For those of you who don't know, JKD is a "strong side forward" style. Meaning that if you are right handed, you fight like a lefty, with your right foot/ hand closest to the opponent. The logic being that your strongest weapons are up front. Also for those who dont know, "interception" is a big goal of JKD. Trying to "beat someone to the punch", or "don't block, just hit" are common practices for JKD'ers.

I've had some injuries and needed to take time off lately. The above goals are hard enough when practicing continuously, let alone sporadically. It got me thinking, "are these goals really attainable for a guy like me"? By "a guy like me" I don't just mean good looking, funny, intelligent, etc. like most of you are thinking. :wink: I mean someone who only trains 2 - 3 times per week, 1 - 1.5 hours at a shot. How realistic are these goals?
 

Rook

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Well, I should point out that the majority of Chinese arts are also strong-side forward. I don't think that the goal is unrealistic - however, you have to think about personal fighting strategy. I'm still very much trying to pin mine down, but you should consider your strong points and weak points. Depending on your body type and prefered tactics, developing the strong points of JFGF might not be the best way to achieve your goals (I don't know what your goals are, so I can't help much there).

You've probably heard these points before but Bruce Lee's personal JKD, what we now call Jun Fan Gung Fu, was largely based around his personal speed - he was always freakishly fast and he built an art that did its best to absolutely maximize the use of speed - one where stright lines and short lines allowed him to use his speed to its greatest extent. The modified fencing stance is built for speed more than striking power or takedown defense or throws. The stright right that is a staple of JKD striking theory is probably one of if not the fasted punch out there.

A normal person might not think of his speed as his greatest advantage - especially someone who has many other things going on in life and can't afford pylometrics-related injuries and such.
 

hongkongfooey

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The vast majority of people that do martial arts train just like you do. With work/ school and family life, it is hard to train every day for hours at a time. You have to ask yourself, what do I want out of my training? I look at it this way. Training a few hours a week is better than never training at all. Make the most out of your time. If you are having trouble with those concepts, then work them the most. You'll never be the caliber of a professional fighter, by traing a few hours a week, but you'll be ahead of the average Joe
 

still learning

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Hello, One of the reasons "Bruce Lee" learn to fight strong side up front is because he had one leg longer than the other. Plus many chinese styles fight this way too.

Each of us will find we like one side more, it depends on your body and what works for you....there is no right answer here. Think about it...does it matter strong side has to be in the front? ....in a real fight..total chaos..anything goes....fist/kicks and everything else coming at you real quickly...you will be moving around alot...maybe evening changing stances?

The best fighter/sports people are the best...because they train harder than anyone else...not because of with leg is in front!

I like to keep a leg in front...sometimes two...sometimes keep them running fast........Aloha
 

Hand Sword

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I put this in the general section because I want unbiased opinions, not just hose of JKD practitioners. For those of you who don't know, JKD is a "strong side forward" style. Meaning that if you are right handed, you fight like a lefty, with your right foot/ hand closest to the opponent. The logic being that your strongest weapons are up front. Also for those who dont know, "interception" is a big goal of JKD. Trying to "beat someone to the punch", or "don't block, just hit" are common practices for JKD'ers.

I've had some injuries and needed to take time off lately. The above goals are hard enough when practicing continuously, let alone sporadically. It got me thinking, "are these goals really attainable for a guy like me"? By "a guy like me" I don't just mean good looking, funny, intelligent, etc. like most of you are thinking. :wink: I mean someone who only trains 2 - 3 times per week, 1 - 1.5 hours at a shot. How realistic are these goals?

Yes, with enough time and practice, you will be able to attain those goals. Everyone is different though, some pick it up quicker than others. Don't worry though, I bet you're already better than when you first started. This process will continue for you. You will face a lot of frustration at times, but, Hang in there, and keep at it. Good Luck!
 

pstarr

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Still Learning is right... Lee had one leg longer than the other.

But speed isn't necessarily the thing to focus on. Lee had a gift insofar as speed goes and most of the rest of us don't. And speed is something to develop when you're young because as you get older, no matter how hard you try, your speed will begin to decline.

But timing can only get better with age. That's one of the reasons the oldsters could often defeat younger opponents. They weren't necessarily faster - their timing was much, much finer.

There are various training drills that can help develop this skill to a very high degree. And that's attainable by anyone who wants to put in the time and effort-
 

Rook

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There are various training drills that can help develop this skill to a very high degree. And that's attainable by anyone who wants to put in the time and effort-

Are these art-specific drills you have in mind? If they are not, maybe we can start some threads on them.
 

Cirdan

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Training as the average Joe can get one pretty far. The thing is not to put the art completely out of your mind when you go home. Doing a just few minutes of practice on days you otherwise don`t train can help tremendously. A hundered punches a day, for instance, really adds up.
 

Carol

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There is an addage that has been quoted by many MA instructors -

Q: How long does it take the average person to get a black belt?

A: Average people don't get black belts


Can training 2-3x per week enable you to accomplish your goals as a martial artist? It can, but much of the impetus comes from you, and whether you are pushing yourself to get as much out of your training as you can. You are the best judge of your own ability...do you see yourself progressing or do you find that you are plateauing out? Reaching a plateau is natural, staying at the plateau is not.
 

Hand Sword

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Reaching a plateau is natural, staying at the plateau is not.


Great!! Just when I was getting comfy with that excuse. Thanks!
icon7.gif
 

Cirdan

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Actually I think the average Joe trains less than 2-3 times a week. At a large Karate club here in town the average member trains 1 1/3 times a week, 1 1/2 hr classes. Even tough the club has classes every day. The reason most people don`t make black belt is simply that they quit. Keep working at it, don`t skip too many classes and you will reach far.

The only difference between the possible and the impossible is one's will. - Hironori Ohtsuka Sensei
 

searcher

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If you answer a question for me I might have a response to your original post. I have a limited knowledge of JKD, I have only read Tao Of Jeet Kune Do, with no hands on. Is not the purpose of JKD to set the system more for the individual and not for a set way of doing something? What I am saying is, should you not "alter" the system to what your needs are? If you think it is un-attainable in your opinion then you should adapt it to make it work.
 

Shotochem

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Just about any MA goal is attainable. It just may take longer. I can't see why someone taking classes 2-3 days a week can't make BB. Eventually.

Lets face it a 18 yr old who trains 5 days a week in the dojo will get to BB a lot faster that a 40 yr old 3x a week.

I'm not 18 anymore and there is no way my body can handle going to class 5-6 days a week and working FT with a wife and kids. I prefer the 4 class a week schedule train 2 off 1 train 2 off 1 ect with daily stretching and body weight excerscise.
 

hongkongfooey

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Just about any MA goal is attainable. It just may take longer. I can't see why someone taking classes 2-3 days a week can't make BB. Eventually.

Lets face it a 18 yr old who trains 5 days a week in the dojo will get to BB a lot faster that a 40 yr old 3x a week.

I'm not 18 anymore and there is no way my body can handle going to class 5-6 days a week and working FT with a wife and kids. I prefer the 4 class a week schedule train 2 off 1 train 2 off 1 ect with daily stretching and body weight excerscise.


But will that 18 year old kid understand the material better than the 40 year old person. When I was 19, I started Kenpo. I trained for a few years, then was away for a long time. I recently re-started about a year ago, in the same system. I now understand things better at 34, than I did at 19. I guess there is something to that whole age and wisdom thing afterall. LOL! I just wish I could heal as fast as I did when I was 19! Damn elbows.
 

michaeledward

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Hello, One of the reasons "Bruce Lee" learn to fight strong side up front is because he had one leg longer than the other. Plus many chinese styles fight this way too.

I think one of the other issues related to the choice of Bruce Lee fighting strong side forward (if he did - I know very little about Mr. Lee). Is that he was a little guy. I understand that he weighed about 130 pounds soaking wet.

Mass Matters. There is a reason boxing has weight divisions. Put a 250 pounder with backup mass executing a proper punch, and a little guy is not going to be able to effectively block that punch. He may be able to parry it. But the block would collapse in on him.

Because of this, it was probably essential that a person like Bruce Lee would need to put his best weapons forward, and work speed.

Maybe?
 
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