Aikido has no reason to prove itself!

Urban Trekker

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I don't think face came up in that conversation, there was certainly a lot of posturing, but I don't remember having my parking validated, was I supposed to ask for the stamp at the main desk?
Not sure what the analogy means, but I was referring to my interaction with the guy before you. I gave him plenty of chances to exit without a scratch on his ego, but some people have to feel like they've earned the W in an internet pissing contest in order to feel good.
 
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Urban Trekker

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Yeah. When technically you could go anywhere and see the same results.
I was trying to suggest an area where one is more likely to run into someone with real fighting experience. Those fights we see on World Star Hip Hop aren't happening in gated communities...
 
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Shatteredzen

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I was trying to suggest an area where one is more likely to run into someone with real fighting experience. Those fights we see on World Star Hip Hop aren't happening in gated communities...
So videos of guys throwing surprise shots at pedestrians, often with their back turned, check.
 

Shatteredzen

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Yeah. When technically you could go anywhere and see the same results.

I don't know many reputable fighters who think Aikido has much merit.
So your personal experience is valid, just not anyone elses?
 

Shatteredzen

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Ramsey Dewey has spoken out on aikido as well. No need to feel bad, though. He doesn't bash aikido nearly as much as be bashes krav maga.
Ramsey Dewey gave his opinion on the state of Aikido, his arguments with anything are training and the behavior of the community. Dewey would be one of the first people to tell you its about the quality of your personal training, you are misrepresenting his complaints with your absolute position that Aikido doesn't work.
 

Anarax

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It's an important thing for people to understand, as they're getting a false sense of confidence, in regards to training Aikido and developing combat ability. Did you ever see anyone question this to their instructor, after they were unsuccessful with applying Aikido against a resisting partner? I'm curious to know what the instructors take on this would be.
I saw the instructor try a technique on a resisting opponent and he failed at effectively executing the technique. He told the resisting student, who he told to resist the technique, to get out of the class for he was "looking for a fight".
 
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Anarax

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if there's one thing I've learned it's that NO empty hand martial art works. The only thing that will work is the man/woman using that art.
I agree with you the individual plays a factor in how effective they will be in an encounter . However, each style has it's own training culture and methods on skill development. The methodology/culture that emphasizes contact drills(pad work, randori, combo exchanges) opposed to those that emphasize only no-contact or cooperative drills will result in two different outcomes. The first method will produce a more combatively capable martial artist, while the other not as much.
It's the most determined person and not the better trained or experienced person that will prevail in an encounter
The more determined in training will result in those that are more combatively capable. However, in an encounter, training and experience play a tremendous factor. You can be more determined, but if you're receiving hard face shots or are thrown into the ground head first by a better trained opponent, your determination is going to give out either mentally or physically.
yes some teach it as an art form rather than a martial art.
Aikido itself is almost universally known as the cooperative training style for that's the one most common.
 

Urban Trekker

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I know, there's also people getting jumped, drunk idiots boxing and a variety of other street crimes.


But hey, I guess when you walk around your sub division, I mean, "hood", sorry, showing people video of your sweet martial arts to intimidate them that's part of the scene huh?

I could, but then again, you're the one who trains in a martial art that has much to prove. I'm not saying to intimate anyone, I'm saying you need to see if they're intimidated. That is, to substantiate your claim that people with real fighting experience won't say that aikido doesn't work. If you want to mock me for suggesting that you substantiate your claim, it's all good. It's just proof that you can't.

But I can save you time by giving you the answer to that question, with regards to how people view a bunch of dudes in hakamas ballroom dancing with each other.
 
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Urban Trekker

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Ramsey Dewey gave his opinion on the state of Aikido, his arguments with anything are training and the behavior of the community. Dewey would be one of the first people to tell you its about the quality of your personal training, you are misrepresenting his complaints with your absolute position that Aikido doesn't work.
Wrong.

You need to watch his videos again.
 

Steve

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I think it's most useful and instructive to look at the average students. That's going to give you a sense of the quality of the training model. Drop the bottom 25% and the top. How well do the average students perform? Are they making predictable progress developing reliable, repeatable skills?

I think in some styles, if we are being honest, the answer is no. In others, the answer is yes.

What are the common denominators in each of these categories? I'll tell you, it's not the age of the style. It's not striking or grappling. It's not where it comes from, or if it feels traditional. We all know what it is. And we all know where aikido fits in.
 

Shatteredzen

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I think it's most useful and instructive to look at the average students. That's going to give you a sense of the quality of the training model. Drop the bottom 25% and the top. How well do the average students perform? Are they making predictable progress developing reliable, repeatable skills?

I think in some styles, if we are being honest, the answer is no. In others, the answer is yes.

What are the common denominators in each of these categories? I'll tell you, it's not the age of the style. It's not striking or grappling. It's not where it comes from, or if it feels traditional. We all know what it is. And we all know where aikido fits in.
Now we are arguing about the quality of available schools, not the system. Unless we are going to equate the system itself to the current body of schools. If you learn to apply the techniques with resistive training, it works for what its designed to do. This is more of the false premise that a martial art needs to be unilaterally effective in all conditions. It doesnt, it merely has to perform the way it is intended. Once again, BJJ has no striking, yet that fact seems to get forgotten everytime this discussion comes up. The bulk of Aikido is in its philosophy, movement and methodology, the sixty or so techniques which make up its forms fill the gaps in Judo and Ju-Jitsu the way they were intended to.
 

drop bear

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So your personal experience is valid, just not anyone elses?

Look if you can find a reputable fighter who has something good to say. I will change my opinion.

I mean I can find reputable people who don't pretty easily.

 

Hanzou

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Look if you can find a reputable fighter who has something good to say. I will change my opinion.

I mean I can find reputable people who don't pretty easily.


That's Bas being as respectful as he can possibly be.
 

Ivan

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I have a simple question here.

Do Aikido guys train how to block a punch? Are there any video to prove that?
They train to use the momentum of the punch to take down the opponent. This is prominent in Traditional Jiujitsu too. Common techniques when countering the punch are hip throws, wrist locks and arm lock takedowns. Here:

 

Steve

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Now we are arguing about the quality of available schools, not the system. Unless we are going to equate the system itself to the current body of schools. If you learn to apply the techniques with resistive training, it works for what its designed to do. This is more of the false premise that a martial art needs to be unilaterally effective in all conditions. It doesnt, it merely has to perform the way it is intended. Once again, BJJ has no striking, yet that fact seems to get forgotten everytime this discussion comes up. The bulk of Aikido is in its philosophy, movement and methodology, the sixty or so techniques which make up its forms fill the gaps in Judo and Ju-Jitsu the way they were intended to.
Whether there is striking or grappling is irrelevant to whether the training model is sound. You don't have to learn everything. I think you just need to learn to do what you think you're learning to do. In BJJ you lean to apply reliable grappling skills. In aikido, you said yourself that this isn't so.

Its not the schools. It's the style writ large.
 
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