A police takedown.

Holmejr

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Thoughts on the standing Kimura?

We do this. But preface it with a few softening up blows and maybe a knee . Some folks look at these videos done in slow motion and with compliant training partners and think it gives the perpetrator to much time or positioning to counter, but this and other locks, takedowns, etc. are violent acts that have to be executed quickly almost without thought. It all has a place in ones arsenal.
 
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drop bear

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Thoughts on the standing Kimura?


Not a fan. Seems a bit unsecured. Not the lock but everything else. The idea is people are going to just randomly thrash. Not move in the right direction to relieve the lock.

So you get all these weird things happen.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Thoughts on the standing Kimura?

If I'm his partner, my right hand will pull his forehead back (eyebrow wipping). Before he can apply pressure on my left arm, he won't be able to stop me from using my right hand to reach to his forehead.

People always said that eye gouging is a bad technique. But if you allow your opponent's hand to reach to your eyes, that's your fault.



Your neck muscle is not very strong to against the arm muscle.

Chang_eyebrow_mop.jpg
 
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Holmejr

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Not a fan. Seems a bit unsecured. Not the lock but everything else. The idea is people are going to just randomly thrash. Not move in the right direction to relieve the lock.

So you get all these weird things happen
If I'm his partner, my right hand will pull his forehead back (eyebrow wipping). Before he can apply pressure on my left arm, he won't be able to stop me from using my right hand to reach to his forehead.

People always said that eye gouging is a bad technique. But if you allow your opponent's hand to reach to your eyes, that's your fault.



My opponent's right arm is free. He can do a lot of counters.

I don't like to use right arm to control my opponent's left arm. I can't use his left arm to jam his own right arm (since I'm in his "front door").

But if I use my right arm to control my opponent's right arm, I can use his right arm to jam his own left arm (since I'm in his "side door"), and I don't have to worry about his free left arm.
How about it your opponent is hurting from a few good blows and bent over? That is the trouble with demo videos. You really have to be imaginative enough to see the technique in different situations.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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How about it your opponent is hurting from a few good blows and bent over? That is the trouble with demo videos. You really have to be imaginative enough to see the technique in different situations.
Of course if you apply this technique against a person that you have almost knocked him out, he may not have any ability to counter you. But that's not the normal situation.

When I look at a video technique, I always look at the opponent's free arm/arms. The more that one has controlled over his opponent's arm/arms, the better that his technique is.
 
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Holmejr

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Of course if you apply this technique against a person that you have almost knocked him out, he may not have any ability to counter you. But that's not the normal situation.

When I look at a video technique, I always look at the opponent's free arm/arms. The more that one has controlled over his opponent's arm/arms, the better that his technique is.
I agree, best to isolate or render useless all other weapons. The point is that there is a time and place for virtually every technique. We presuppose there is a weapon in play, hence the softening up. Similar to the straight arm bar take down. It might or might not be the proper technique at that moment, but that is why we have an arsenal to flow with. Again, IMO it all works better with a bit of softening up.usually kinda sorta.
 

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Similar to the straight arm bar take down.
This elbow lock take down is much safter. You are on your opponent's side door. His leading right arm can jam his own back left arm. You use "front cut" to lift his leading foot off the ground, and take him down.

IMO, a good joint lock should combine with a good throw at the same time.

 

Holmejr

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This elbow lock take down is much safter. You are on your opponent's side door. His leading right arm can jam his own back left arm. You use "front cut" to lift his leading foot off the ground, and take him down.

IMO, a good joint lock should combine with a good throw at the same time.

Yes we use that also. Except the hand has a knife in it LOL. Works great after breaking opponents elbow, elbow in ribs or face and knee to ribs. Hinders them from countering妃aybe夷t all good stuff and all has its moment.
 

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Yes we use that also. Except the hand has a knife in it LOL. Works great after breaking opponents elbow, elbow in ribs or face and knee to ribs. Hinders them from countering妃aybe夷t all good stuff and all has its moment.
Agree! This technique was originally used to deal with a knife attack.


In the other clip, he uses arm bar to set it up instead. You use arm bar to straight your opponent's arm. When your opponent resists and refuses his arm to be straight, you borrow his resistance force, and help him to bend his arm more than he wants to.

Again, the beauty of this technique is when you use arm bar on your opponent's right arm, his left arm cannot reach you.

 
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Jared Traveler

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Thoughts on the standing Kimura?

I don't like it from a standing position. I it exposes your back way too much when attempting it. From the ground this isn't a huge issues, but standing it is. It's a no for me.
 
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How about it your opponent is hurting from a few good blows and bent over? That is the trouble with demo videos. You really have to be imaginative enough to see the technique in different situations.

If I want to beat a guy up. There are easier ways to do that than a kimoura lock.
 
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drop bear

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Thoughts on the standing Kimura?


In fact the roll sweep thing would probably be the better option.


As much as that is something that could go hilariously wrong.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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If I want to beat a guy up. There are easier ways to do that than a kimoura lock.
Old saying said, "A bad punch is still better than a good lock." If your body is uniformed, it's very difficult to apply lock on you. The Aikido "unbendable arm" is a simple example. As long as you can image that water flow from your shoulder to your hand, your arm can be difficult to bend.
 

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Old saying said, "A bad punch is still better than a good lock." If your body is uniformed, it's very difficult to apply lock on you. The Aikido "unbendable arm" is a simple example. As long as you can image that water flow from your shoulder to your hand, your arm can be difficult to bend.
This is why ideally locks are done in a position that the suspect or attacker wants to move his arm.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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driving fast and not wearing a seat belt.
A should not just move in and totally ignores B's free left arm. In other words, A's entering strategy has some flaws.


A perfect "entering starategy" will require that you can control both of your opponent's arms and also his leading leg when you enter. It's not an easy task.

In the following clip, when the old man enter, he:

- underhooks his opponent's right arm.
- arm wraps his opponent's left arm.
- shin bites on his opponent's right leg.

It's a perfect "entering strategy".


I call this kind of entering strategy as "octopus" strategy.

my-upper-leg-bite.gif
 
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Holmejr

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About the same thoughts I have about driving fast and not wearing a seat belt.

I mean, you could get away with it at times, but, you know.
You mean when it presents itself properly and of course after a bit of pummeling LOL.
 

Holmejr

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A should not just move in and totally ignores B's free left arm. In other words, A's entering strategy has some flaws.


A perfect "entering starategy" will require that you can control both of your opponent's arms and also his leading leg when you enter. It's not an easy task.

In the following clip, when the old man enter, he:

- underhooks his opponent's right arm.
- arm wraps his opponent's left arm.
- shin bites on his opponent's right leg.

It's a perfect "entering strategy".


I call this kind of entering strategy as "octopus" strategy.

my-upper-leg-bite.gif
Yes, we do that underhook throw. After a bit of pummeling.
 
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