A new wrinkle in the life of DarkPhoenix

CDKJudoka

Purple Belt
Joined
Dec 18, 2008
Messages
346
Reaction score
13
Location
Hicksville, NY
After working at my job for six months, I am guessing as a temp position, yet the owner never stated that, I was laid off on Friday. Being that I worked for an AC Delco distributor, I know that the sales have been suffering due to the economy.

After helping Sabumnim with a few computer issues he had at his office, he offered me a job working for him as an instructor. I have been assisting with the classes for the past few months, but with the basics, SD, and also some grappling and groundwork. Now this would be the first time I am teaching in a civilian setting, and may be instructing the younger students.

I am looking for some pointers on how I should go about teaching them, as the atmosphere of TMA schools in the US has changed drastically since I started TKD almost 20 years ago. I want to make sure that the techniques and ciricculum are performed correctly, without having Johnny's mom or dad getting upset because their child isn't testing this round, or because I am complimenting them on a really sloppy tech. I am a bit of a hardass when it comes to this due to my military background, but I know I can get results.

Any help from instructors or dojang owners would be great.

Thanks guys.
 

Twin Fist

Grandmaster
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
7,185
Reaction score
210
Location
Nacogdoches, Tx
teach the way you were taught.

you MUST be true to yourself as a teacher, if you are not, it WILL be seen, and it WILL come across as being unsure.

the thing is, for the student to learn, he has to have confidence in the instructor. you cannot come across as unsure.

he wouldnt have offered you the job if he wasnt SURE you could do it.
 

terryl965

<center><font size="2"><B>Martial Talk Ultimate<BR
MTS Alumni
Joined
Apr 9, 2004
Messages
41,259
Reaction score
340
Location
Grand Prairie Texas
DP since you have been training with your instructor you need to do what you have already been doing, that is why he ask you in the first place. Never loose sight of what was when going forward and remember every student deserve the best training that you can provide each and everyday.
 

MA-Caver

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Aug 21, 2003
Messages
14,960
Reaction score
312
Location
Chattanooga, TN
I don't see how losing one job and being offered another as a wrinkle. I wasn't so lucky and was unemployed for months :rolleyes: ... so having a job now-a-days is a pretty dang good thing.

But I agree... teach as you were taught and be true to yourself ... remember yourself as a student and your own impression of your previous instructors... your students will be having the same thing.
 

Brad Dunne

Brown Belt
Joined
Feb 6, 2005
Messages
472
Reaction score
25
First and foremost, talk with your instructor and understand what he wants/needs from you. You got the position because he knows your physical qualifications, but your teaching applications may differ from his. Make sure your both on the same page, because if your not, both of you could have a difficult situation arise.
 

StuartA

Black Belt
Joined
Feb 4, 2008
Messages
634
Reaction score
33
Location
London
teach the way you were taught.
I almost agree with all of this except the first part.. don't teach the way you were taught, teach the way you feel TKD is meant to be taught or how you would have liked it taught!

you MUST be true to yourself as a teacher, if you are not, it WILL be seen, and it WILL come across as being unsure.

the thing is, for the student to learn, he has to have confidence in the instructor. you cannot come across as unsure.

he wouldnt have offered you the job if he wasnt SURE you could do it.
The rest I agree with 100%. You have been honoured and recognised.. not as a sheep but with confidence in you as an instructor.. time to make your way brother.

Well done.

Stuart
 

granfire

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Dec 8, 2007
Messages
16,006
Reaction score
1,612
Location
In Pain
There are only a few things you have to mellow out on, but pretty much, be firm but fair.
Usually the students dig it. Your instructor must think you have the stuff.

And if all else fails, you got a pretty big network of instructors to bounce ideas off of.

And since you are not the boss, you can always send any questions that are outside your expertise to him, including the final decision on whether or not a student is testing.

Keep a sense of humor, too.
 
OP
CDKJudoka

CDKJudoka

Purple Belt
Joined
Dec 18, 2008
Messages
346
Reaction score
13
Location
Hicksville, NY
Thanks for the replies guys. I'll be talking to him more during the next week as to what he wants in my instruction. I am looking forward to the opportunity, especially knowing now that he wants to start incorporating MMA style sparring the the Advanced Teen/Adult classes, one, knowing that is the way the laymen are starting to get interest in the Martial Arts, and two, since he has given me his blessings to start cross-training with BJJ and continuing with my Judo training, as well as my desire to start getting into MMA myself.

He has seen my teaching style with the Teen/Adult classes, which is how I was trained as a student. I started my training with a very traditional instructor, which meant that if every move wasn't to his standards, you would do them until you got it right. Some of his yudanja, I wouldn't have let them test for 3rd gup at the level they are at, and frankly it really disappoints me to see that, as he is a phenomonal instructor and an amazing taekwondoin. That I say falls on his other instructors, with are great TKDin in their own rights, but they are not correcting the shortfalls of the students. As some have seen in the video I posted in another thread, the movement of the forms was not as sharp and crisp as they could have been, and he has made mention of it as well, but the three other instructors haven't really be getting on the students for it.

I have my apprehension towards the offer as I don't want to start alienating people from MA study because I know I am hard *** when it comes to this, but I also do not want to see this art diluted and degraded any further than it is by giving the students a false confidence in the techniques that are flawed.

Sorry if I am babbling here about this, I just wanted to have an audience of instructors that I could lay out my thoughts before I really start speaking to sabumnim about it.
 

granfire

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Dec 8, 2007
Messages
16,006
Reaction score
1,612
Location
In Pain
well, you have to find a positive way to encourage better performance.

it takes some trial and error, and each individual is a bit different. (and it seems the younger the more praise they need, even for showing up, Thank You So Much Barney.... :barf:)
 

IcemanSK

El Conquistador nim!
MT Mentor
MTS Alumni
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
6,482
Reaction score
181
Location
Los Angeles, CA
Sounds like a great opportunity. Your SBN has faith in you, that's excellent! Enjoy it.
 

Miles

Senior Master
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Messages
2,254
Reaction score
56
Location
Metro-Detroit
Good luck and please report how it goes! You've already received some excellent advice.
 

Aefibird

Green Belt
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
132
Reaction score
7
Location
South Yorkshire, UK
Good luck! :)

Trust in your abilities - your SBN wouldn't have asked you to teach unless he thought you were more than capable.

As for your standards - make sure you let your students know you have high standards but tell them why.

It's for their own benefit that you make them work on the basics or become sharper in their forms or whatever. Good students will benefit from your teaching and will thank you for it.

Those who don't like it... well there's plenty of other instructors out there who will give them the belt they want for the right amount of 瞿瞿瞿.
 

Latest Discussions

Top