Am I using a dolyo chagi chamber for a yeop chagi here? (VIDEO)=

Discussion in 'Tae-Kwon-Do' started by Acronym, Aug 1, 2020.

  1. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    It can only take one path if you do it with the lead leg, and those are the types of skipping side kicks I was referring to. Not everybody throws them hard either. I would say a majority do not but it's been a while and I did not take notes:)
     
  2. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    Why would the direction of the travel path affect power if the momentum and weight distribution is the same on impact?
     
  3. Jaeimseu

    Jaeimseu 2nd Black Belt

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    The path changes depending on the location of the foot relative to the target. If the striking surface of the foot is facing the target in the chambered position, it can move directly through the target. If the striking surface is moving across the target, much of the power is focused in the wrong direction.


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  4. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    But you can do an inital chamber as a roundhouse and end up with a classical side kick chamber during point of impact. And if that inital chamber of a roundhouse had more momentum, It would logically lead to more power than a consistent side kick chamber with less momentum.
     
  5. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    That last post was in reference to the rear leg btw.
     
  6. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    Back the to the lead leg - the reason it's harder to generate force with lead leg side kicks compared to a rear leg roundhouse kicks, is because you have to muscle it to some extent. Whereas a roundhouse kick gets most of its power from your hip and the torque.

    So you need strong legs. You don't need strong legs for a roundhouse kick off the rear leg, believe it or not. The torque and pivot takes care of all of it.
     
  7. Jaeimseu

    Jaeimseu 2nd Black Belt

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    In theory, this is possible, but my experience tells me that few people do this with consistency. Most of the time you can hear the sliding sound of the foot scraping across the mitt or target.

    Having said that, how much power is necessary depends on the context. If the power generated is sufficient for the job at hand, then it could be argued that the chamber position isn’t that important. However, I believe chambering round kick style isn’t as reliable for most people.


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  8. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    The main reason people fail rear leg side kicks on mitts is not the chamber or point of impact, in my experience. It's more their torso mechanics and losing momentum in the pivot.

    In the rear leg side kick you are pivoting to lean backwards (a bit) and combining these concepts often make you lose the momentum and it ends up just a leg kick.

    In the roundhouse kick off the rear leg, you are creating momentum to lean to the side and it's easier to maintain because the force is still semi-forward, hence less risk of losing the momentum.

    Rear leg side kicks can also be a ***** if you haven't thrown them off the proper distance, wheras Roundhouse kicks are less sensitive to how close you are standing because your foot is not pushing through, it's slamming in.
     
  9. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    When I do this skipping movement, I don't know exactly how much to lean for maximum power. It simply comes from experience and intuition, a fraction of a section before extention.

    People who struggle have more problems to deal with so simply adressing their leans won't solve much.

     
  10. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    And to be honest, I don't want to waste time on Rear leg side kicks because they are almost never used in sparring. They take too to long to reach the target.
     
  11. Jaeimseu

    Jaeimseu 2nd Black Belt

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    We can certainly agree on that. Most rear leg side kicks fail because they’re easy to spot and evade.


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  12. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    Yet basics in the dojang usually drill rear leg side kicks, not the lead one. It's good for a personal challenge to be great at them but not much else.
     
  13. Jaeimseu

    Jaeimseu 2nd Black Belt

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    I think this may differ from dojang to dojang. We don’t drill them all that often at my school.


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  14. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    Side kicks in patterns are rear leg....
     
  15. Jaeimseu

    Jaeimseu 2nd Black Belt

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    True, but patterns/forms/poomsae isn’t the basis of our program. It’s a part, certainly, but we don’t spend the majority of training time on it.


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  16. Acronym

    Acronym Master Black Belt

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    So what is the basis - sparring?
     
  17. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I was mostly talking about the discussion of turning vs. side kicks. My training includes a very small number of kicks, and a lot of what the "kickers" on here talk about is very over my head.
     
  18. dvcochran

    dvcochran Grandmaster

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    Then it would not be a side kick. The two kicks use different muscle groups and body posture/rotation.
     
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  19. dvcochran

    dvcochran Grandmaster

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    And I would add, how many times do you really get to do a 'perfect' rear leg roundhouse kick when sparring? More often than not there is some degree of off balance. Something a person has to train to learn how to adjust for.
     
  20. dvcochran

    dvcochran Grandmaster

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    My personal favorite and most efficient use of a rear leg side kick is when I catch an opponent taking cross step when my shoulders are open to them. Easy pickings for a near side head shot.
    We also work a variant where you fake a spin and follow through with the rear leg if they slide back instead of step back. You have a lot of momentum working in your favor.123
     

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