Your sparring in class?

searcher

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I am sure this has come up in the past in other sections, but I am to lazy to search for the thread. I was watching my little beginners spar last night and I got to wondering how others conduct their sparring.

Equipment?
Rules or lack of?
Level of contact?
Safety precautions?
Technique limitations?


I currently have no technique limitations. No groin contact, spine side contact, or kicking the knees. Contact level is as hard as they can go. No technique limitations. I allow them to go to the ground, but limit to 30 seconds.

So, what say you?
 

Stac3y

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Light contact (adults can go harder by mutual agreement)
No sweeps or takedowns.
Adults don't spar until yellow belt.
Blind techniques are strongly discouraged.
We pause and tap gloves to acknowledge a point.
Emphasis is on control and precise targetting.

Kids' targets:
face (only when wearing face shield)
back and sides of head
kidneys
sides
front of torso
groin is a foul; joint attacks are a foul

Adult targets:
all of above plus groin and top of head
joint attacks are a foul

Gear:
headgear (not required for black belts)
face shield (not required for brown belts & up)
handgear or boxing gloves
footgear (only for orange belt and above for kids; all adults)
 
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jarrod

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I am sure this has come up in the past in other sections, but I am to lazy to search for the thread. I was watching my little beginners spar last night and I got to wondering how others conduct their sparring.

Equipment?
Rules or lack of?
Level of contact?
Safety precautions?
Technique limitations?


I currently have no technique limitations. No groin contact, spine side contact, or kicking the knees. Contact level is as hard as they can go. No technique limitations. I allow them to go to the ground, but limit to 30 seconds.

So, what say you?

it varies a bit whether we're talking about my jujitsu class, my coach's jujitsu class, or my other coach's kickboxing class. generally though the basic rule is don't use techs you can't control, don't hurt each other, & step it up if you have a competition coming.

for instance my jujitsu coach doesn't allow heel hooks or toe holds, but he allows people to work them with me because he knows i can control them.

some of dwane's guys (me included) don't wear cups, though mouthpieces are a must. but we will spar based on whatever rules we agree on before hand: full contact, international, muay thai, & occasionally san shou.

one thing i really like about both places i train is that they try to make you ready for most almost any competition you would choose to do. for instance at welcome mat/lawrence grappling club we've competed in judo, jujitsu, sambo, wrestling, & mma. at dwanes kickboxing, guys have competed in full contact, international, muay thai, & mma. lots of flexibility allowed in how we spar.

jf
 

Hudson69

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Mouth piece, light MMA gloves or similar, a cup is optional but encouraged. We go about 1/2 to 3/4 speed and if it looks like two people are getting a little too physical then we slow or back them down. Take downs are okay and encouraged but everything is watched by the entire group and if anything looks like it might be getting crazy we stop it immediately. Any blood that gets drawn requires an immediate stoppage and will only proceed if the "bleeder" is willing.

There are no kids in the class, the youngest is 19, so childrens sparring has never been an issue but for as rough as it sounds it is very controlled. Much of the sparring we do is in street clothes but with the gloves and mouth piece (sometimes shoes are allowed).

Only one fight is allowed at a time and everyone is encouraged to watch and afterward anyone can comment on the sparring match to point out strong and weak points.
 

Da Supa Freak

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My sensei's rules White and Yellow (age 16+) Karate:

- Gloves must be worn at all times. Mouthguards highly recommended (required for in-school tournaments). Groin protection recommended for guys.
- Head is a target, but you must pull-back before contact
- Penalties for contact below the belt or above shoulders
- No jabs or hammer strikes to the body
- No sweeps, takedowns, joint locks, or palm-strikes

As we go up in level, more is allowed. Takedowns are legal for Orange and up. Contact legal for back of the head if both fighters have mouthguards. Sweeps are generally Purple+... etc. The general pattern I've noticed is that you can use significant new stuff after you've ranked up after learning it.
 

Gordon Nore

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With young children I have my own rule, which might be unique. I call it, No Blind Techniques. Sometimes a youngster will rush in and throw a punch or back fist with his/her head turned away. I'm concerned that kids will get hurt, so I tell them if they can't see the target, they didn't score the point. If I see too many 'blind techniques,' I will end the match.
 
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searcher

searcher

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So besides jarrod(since I know how Duane spars), does anyone go hard enough to have people bleeding or even injured in class?

We have not had anything serious, a few broken bones and some mild concussions. But nothing to write home about.
 

Stac3y

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So besides jarrod(since I know how Duane spars), does anyone go hard enough to have people bleeding or even injured in class?

We have not had anything serious, a few broken bones and some mild concussions. But nothing to write home about.

We have occasional injuries. Advanced belts are allowed to go harder (if both agree and are adults). I've split a couple of lips and I've seen someone get a broken foot bone from an elbow block. Most injuries are from falling down, though. Bruises are commonplace--usually from blocking with shins.
 

jks9199

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"No blind techniques" is a pretty standard rule in our competitions. And it's one I apply in class. A blind technique means that you don't know where it'll land -- and it means that you were unprotected while flailing it out. Neither is a good idea... in competition or in the real world.
 

Gordon Nore

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"No blind techniques" is a pretty standard rule in our competitions. And it's one I apply in class. A blind technique means that you don't know where it'll land -- and it means that you were unprotected while flailing it out. Neither is a good idea... in competition or in the real world.

We've had in-house sparring competitions. We've only taken the kids to a tourney once. I see it as a safety thing and as respect for ones sparring opponent.
 
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