Wing Chun at a job interview

mograph

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Exactly what Steve said in both of his posts. This is an assessment of your ability to present, and communicate, under pressure.
... and persuade, no?
 

jks9199

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I'd work out what you like or passionate about more in line with the nature of the job. Work out the qualities they are looking for, and what you enjoy that can reflect and enforce those qualities.

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I agree. Unless you're applying for a job that involves martial arts, I'd use a different topic. Not only is the demonstration hard to make interesting to an outsider, it's possibly going to turn off the interviewer.
 
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jimbo123

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Well thanks for everyone's help. The goal was to make them interested in something. My plan was to give information about wing chun and then how it's benefitted me.

Here was the structure of my presentation in bullet points

1. A few years ago my metabolism started slowing down and I was getting unfit. I hate football and always wanted to learn martial arts

2. Not strength based, it built up my cardiovascular health and because there's not many high kicks no need to learn stretching! (The stretching comment made them laugh)

3. Talked about how it's improved my reflexes. Before if someone tried to slap me, I would get hit or block and get hit anyway. It's taught me to react appropriately and that taught me about the importance of regular training

4. Talked about the close quarter nature of wing chun with example of punching

5. It taught me to respect others. When I get hit I don't take it personally, when I hit other people I apologize if I injure them too much

6. It taught me perseverance. I've seen so many times a tiny person defeat a much larger person in wing chun. Sometimes I train against someone and at first they seem unstoppable until I slowly chip away their defences.

Their questions:

1) I'm lazy about exercising, why should I learn wing chun?
My Answer) I was exactly the same and so were some of my classmates. Ultimately, no one can force you to do it but I recommend you go and at least see a class in action. I did the same and then was tempted to join in and haven't looked back.

2) Why should I learn wing chun instead of boxing, karate or tae kwon doe?
My Answer) No martial art is the best other wise we would all be doing that one. Each one has special qualities. Wing chun is special because a lot of self defence scenarios put you in a small space and that's when people panic. I'm not an expert of Tae Kwon Doe but it involves lots of high kicks and that might not be great in small spaces.
 

geezer

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Well thanks for everyone's help. The goal was to make them interested in something. My plan was to give information about wing chun and then how it's benefitted me.

Here was the structure of my presentation in bullet points ...

Yada yada yada... So did you get the job?




Anyway, here's a rubric for grading your presentation:

D - F: You didn't get the job.

C: You get it on a provisional basis, and the whole time your co-workers tease you with pantomimed "karate-chops" and bad Bruce Lee immitations.

B - A: You get the job straight away and it works out well for you.

A+: You get the job and one or more of your interviewers or co-workers joins your Wing Chun class!
 
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jimbo123

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I haven't found out yet. They're still interviewing people
 

Steve

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Good luck, buddy. Hey, one question I didn't ask and should have. Are you in the USA or somewhere else? Just curious.
 

mograph

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It sounds as if you were well-prepared. Good luck!
 

wingchun100

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I'd be interested to hear the outcome myself, not to mention if anyone asks him any further about wing chun!
 

wingchun100

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If he gets the job, we'll all start doing wing chun at job intervierws

I tried here when they interviewed me for a supervisor position. I said it has given me patience and showed me that you should never think you do anything "good enough," that you should always keep trying to improve or you will stagnate. Needless to say, I am not a supervisor. :-(
 
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jimbo123

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I didn't get the job :(

They said they thought the wing chun presentation was very interesting and they could tell I was passionate about it but I was 'telling' them rather than convincing them.

Also the role involves some sales and they thought I wasn't strong enough in that regards.

Oh well, wish me luck I have another interview tomorrow! They didn't ask me to do a presentation for this one so just a bog standard interview!
 

Steve

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First, I'm very sorry you didn't get the job. But, it sounds like you've already got another iron in the fire. Good luck!

Have you ever worked in sales or in retail? When you say, "telling" vs "convincing" I immediately thought of the difference between a feature and a benefit. In sales, the concept of features vs benefits is fundamental. The idea is that features don't sell a product. Benefits do. The key difference boils down to relating the benefit to your customer.

So, in the case of your interview, this is what I was hinting at when I said that the presentation isn't about WC. Rather, it's about you. Every time you're trying to influence an outcome, whether it's to sell a product, sell yourself (ie, get a job) or to sway someone's opinion, you have to relate to what that person wants or needs. For example, fuel economy in a car is a feature. That is not a selling point. Instead of saying, "This car is fuel efficient" (feature), focus on the benefit, "The fuel efficiency of this car will save you money every month. (benefit)" It's a subtle distinction, but is fundamental and absolutely critical to understand.

Presuming that the feedback you received is on the mark, and that you can stand to do more selling (or influencing or convincing or whatever you want to call it) and less 'telling,' a useful exercise for you might be to bullet out your own strengths. What are your "features?" What do you bring to the table to a prospective employer? Just bullet these items out. Then, for each one, think about how that "feature" translates into a tangible benefit to the employer.

I hope this helps.

Edit: Just want to add, if you google "features vs benefits" you'll get a lot of tips on this very basic sales concept. :)
 

wingchun100

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First, I'm very sorry you didn't get the job. But, it sounds like you've already got another iron in the fire. Good luck!

Have you ever worked in sales or in retail? When you say, "telling" vs "convincing" I immediately thought of the difference between a feature and a benefit. In sales, the concept of features vs benefits is fundamental. The idea is that features don't sell a product. Benefits do. The key difference boils down to relating the benefit to your customer.

So, in the case of your interview, this is what I was hinting at when I said that the presentation isn't about WC. Rather, it's about you. Every time you're trying to influence an outcome, whether it's to sell a product, sell yourself (ie, get a job) or to sway someone's opinion, you have to relate to what that person wants or needs. For example, fuel economy in a car is a feature. That is not a selling point. Instead of saying, "This car is fuel efficient" (feature), focus on the benefit, "The fuel efficiency of this car will save you money every month. (benefit)" It's a subtle distinction, but is fundamental and absolutely critical to understand.

Presuming that the feedback you received is on the mark, and that you can stand to do more selling (or influencing or convincing or whatever you want to call it) and less 'telling,' a useful exercise for you might be to bullet out your own strengths. What are your "features?" What do you bring to the table to a prospective employer? Just bullet these items out. Then, for each one, think about how that "feature" translates into a tangible benefit to the employer.

I hope this helps.

Edit: Just want to add, if you google "features vs benefits" you'll get a lot of tips on this very basic sales concept. :)

I work a home-based business job selling fitness supplements. This will actually be a big help for me too!
 

jks9199

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Sorry to hear you didn't get the job. I am, however, glad to hear that they gave you feedback, and that you seem to have taken it positively so that your next interview is more successful.

Good luck!
 
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