What does Judo Consist of ?

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Hey guys, I am looking to start Judo in the near future. I was hoping to ask someone who has experience. What does it consist of ? I know a lot of it is throws, but is there anything else I should know about ?
Thank you all so much
 

Hanzou

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As with all things a lot of it depends on where you're training. If its sport-based, its going to be primarily throws and break falling, since there's an artificial time limit on the ground. In the rare case that its a non-sport club, you'll get far more of the art. However, even if its sport-based there's so many benefits from Judo practice that its well worth your time.
 

Tony Dismukes

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Regardless of where you train, you will be doing lots of throws and lots of breakfalls. The breakfalls are very important. Being thrown is as much of your training as throwing.

Coverage of groundwork (pins/chokes/armlocks) will range from light to substantial depending on the school. At the very least you should learn some basics and you may learn considerably more than that.

Self-defense applications may or may not be covered at all. I suspect the majority of schools these days are focused almost exclusively on the sport aspects of the art, but I haven't trained at enough Judo dojos to say that authoritatively.
 

Langenschwert

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Also, exhaustion. ;) It's an intense workout. Our club's former sensei (before my time) would not consider it a proper class without people throwing up. I've come close.

Our club does close to 50% newaza (ground work). I hear that is unusual.

The most important thing (asides from do as you're told) is to relax. It's the best way to stay safe.

I'll do Judo for as long as I'm able. I wish I had started it sooner.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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What does it consist of ? ... is there anything else I should know about ?
3 suggestions here.

1. fill in your mission knowledge in each and every categories.

The Judo stand up throws techniques usually can be divided into:

- hand techniques,
- foot techniques,
- leg techniques.

IMO, the stand up throwing technique can be divided into more detail such as "4 sides and 2 doors":

1st side - your right leg attack the outside of your opponent's left leg.
2nd side - your right leg attack the inside of your opponent's left leg.
3rd side - your right leg attack the inside of your opponent's right leg.
4th side - your right leg attack the outside of your opponent's right leg.
front door - your back touch your opponent's chest.
back door - your chest touch your opponent's back.

To develop at least 1 techniques from these 6 categories can be a good starting point.

2. Develop "grip fight" skill.

Also, to spend a good amount of time to develop your "grip fight" skill is very important. If your opponent can't get a good grip on you, he can't throw you. You try to achieve the following:

- You have 2 grips on your opponent but your opponent only has 1 grip on you.
- You have 1 grip on your opponent but your opponent has no grip on you.

In case your opponent has 2 grips on you, you should try as hard as you can to break his grip 1 after another. Try not to get into a "dead lock" situation that you have 2 grips on your opponent, your opponent also has 2 grips on you. You wait for him to do something, he also waits for you to do something.

3. Make your opponent to feel uncomfortable for his grips.

In case your opponent has monster grips and you have hard time to break it, you should at least don't let him to feel comfortable on his grips.

- use your arm to lift up his collar grip arm.
- drop your elbow over his collar grip arm.
- use your hand to pin down his collar grip arm on your chest.
- apply pressure on the elbow joint of his collar grip arm.
- rotate your head to the other side of his collar grip arm.
- twist his sleeve grip arm.
- ...
 
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Chris Parker

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Hey guys, I am looking to start Judo in the near future. I was hoping to ask someone who has experience. What does it consist of ? I know a lot of it is throws, but is there anything else I should know about ?
Thank you all so much

What does it consist of? Practice. Same as any martial art. The techniques aren't the important part

3 suggestions here.

1. fill in your mission knowledge in each and every categories.

The Judo stand up throws techniques usually can be divided into:

- hand techniques,
- foot techniques,
- leg techniques.

IMO, the stand up throwing technique can be divided into more detail such as "4 sides and 2 doors":

1st side - your right leg attack the outside of your opponent's left leg.
2nd side - your right leg attack the inside of your opponent's left leg.
3rd side - your right leg attack the inside of your opponent's right leg.
4th side - your right leg attack the outside of your opponent's right leg.
front door - your back touch your opponent's chest.
back door - your chest touch your opponent's back.

To develop at least 1 techniques from these 6 categories can be a good starting point.

2. Develop "grip fight" skill.

Also, to spend a good amount of time to develop your "grip fight" skill is very important. If your opponent can't get a good grip on you, he can't throw you. You try to achieve the following:

- You have 2 grips on your opponent but your opponent only has 1 grip on you.
- You have 1 grip on your opponent but your opponent has no grip on you.

In case your opponent has 2 grips on you, you should try as hard as you can to break his grip 1 after another. Try not to get into a "dead lock" situation that you have 2 grips on your opponent, your opponent also has 2 grips on you. You wait for him to do something, he also waits for you to do something.

3. Make your opponent to feel uncomfortable for his grips.

In case your opponent has monster grips and you have hard time to break it, you should at least don't let him to feel comfortable on his grips.

- use your arm to lift up his collar grip arm.
- drop your elbow over his collar grip arm.
- use your hand to pin down his collar grip arm on your chest.
- apply pressure on the elbow joint of his collar grip arm.
- rotate your head to the other side of his collar grip arm.
- twist his sleeve grip arm.
- ...

See, now, here's the big issue with the way you try to discuss things here, John you don't have any experience or understanding of Judo, so you're trying to come up with your own description of what you think the art is about and getting much of it wrong. For instance, Judo is made up of 64 official throws (which include sweeping actions and takedowns), which are not divided into "hand, foot, and leg" (for one thing, "foot" and "leg" would be classed as the same thing). The categorisation of throws in Judo is into four groupings Te Waza (hand techniques), Ashi Waza (leg/foot techniques), Koshi Waza (hip techniques), and Sutemi Waza (sacrifice techniques) the rest of your post is again, while potentially true for your perspective on the Chinese wrestling systems you do, it's not entirely correct for Judo. As such, I recommend not telling people how their art should be done just so it fits your personal beliefs especially when the question is about a specific art you clearly don't understand or know.
 

Old Judoka

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Hey guys, I am looking to start Judo in the near future. I was hoping to ask someone who has experience. What does it consist of ? I know a lot of it is throws, but is there anything else I should know about ?
Thank you all so much

Judo has a nice flexible variety of throws which would help in various situation, it's good for your ground work. An often overlooked area of Judo is Shime Waza (Chokes). Judo has a nice arsenal of chokes. Like others have said, it's rare, but if you can get into the right dojo, you can learn Atemi (striking).
 

Jujutsuka

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It consists of just about everything these guys said and more. As a former Judo student myself, I can honestly tell you that it is a well rounded style for throwing and choking an opponent both in the ring and on the street in self-defense. It's pretty easy to pick up on too, if you work hard at it.
 

JP3

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The only thing I'd add to the above... is more use of the word Falling. Lots and lots and lots of falling. Falling until you are sick of falling and then more falling until you love falling. Serious. When you get a little pop of endorphins when you get the first fall of the day in, you're hooked.

Judo is awesome. It's so simple, but not easy. At times both very straightforward and incredibly comnplex, a lifetime of learning is available, but some basic competency can be achieved in about 90 days of going to 3 classes a week, in the right school.


Yeah, I like judo.
 

wingchun100

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Hey guys, I am looking to start Judo in the near future. I was hoping to ask someone who has experience. What does it consist of ? I know a lot of it is throws, but is there anything else I should know about ?
Thank you all so much

Someone mentioned about going to a sports-based club. Unless you want to compete, then you will want to get out of one like that ASAP. Many years ago I trained in a tournament-happy place. There is nothing wrong with that, if that is what you want. However, I was bullied in high school and wanted to be able to use what I learned in the schoolyard. In a sports-based school, you will be learning only how to deal with someone else who also does judo. The odds of squaring off in a bar against another judo practitioner are slim to none, so it was not for me. Again, your needs might be different.
 
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