Trying to find a Technique

Duck76

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Alright, so. I read a lot, even do some writing, and I ran across a fictional martial art with a technique that I can't quite figure out.

For the most part, this martial art seems to be heavily based on Tai Chi Chuan with a little Aikido thrown in. All the other techniques I can find based on the descriptions and in some cases, the names.

However, this one I can't.

Four Corner Throw: Starting throw for most students. The Four Corner Throw is usually done straight up and using the force exerting by the opponent. By lifting the hands up and using the momentum of ones opponent, one can throw the opponent from one of the four corners of a house to the opposite corner if one is fighting in a house. At higher levels, it is possible for one to throw ones opponent to from one corner to any corner that the student likes if four corners are used as a reference.

Going by the name, it is most definitely not based on Aikido's Shiho-Nage. My first thought was a backroll throw(can't remember the proper name atm) but it doesn't fit the description that well.

Any ideas? It sounds like an interesting technique and I'd like to look into it more, but, the author of the writing isn't available to me to ask.
 

drop bear

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Judo and jujitsu have a bunch of variations on this sort of theme.

 
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Duck76

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I had thought of these, but, it's the part where the author says "The Four Corner throw is usually done straight up" that throws me. I keep picturing that move they do in professional wrestling where they toss someone up and over them. Which obviously isn't going to work without the other person jumping to assist.
 

Gerry Seymour

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I had thought of these, but, it's the part where the author says "The Four Corner throw is usually done straight up" that throws me. I keep picturing that move they do in professional wrestling where they toss someone up and over them. Which obviously isn't going to work without the other person jumping to assist.
If you read that as referring to a straight back (as opposed to bent over or kneeling), it could still refer to shihonage. The bit about throwing a long distance seems fluff, in any case, so not much to go by in identifying the throw.
 
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Duck76

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I never thought to look at it that way.

And, yeah, the distance thing is just fluff.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Alright, so. I read a lot, even do some writing, and I ran across a fictional martial art with a technique that I can't quite figure out.

For the most part, this martial art seems to be heavily based on Tai Chi Chuan with a little Aikido thrown in. All the other techniques I can find based on the descriptions and in some cases, the names.

However, this one I can't.

Four Corner Throw: Starting throw for most students. The Four Corner Throw is usually done straight up and using the force exerting by the opponent. By lifting the hands up and using the momentum of ones opponent, one can throw the opponent from one of the four corners of a house to the opposite corner if one is fighting in a house. At higher levels, it is possible for one to throw ones opponent to from one corner to any corner that the student likes if four corners are used as a reference.

Going by the name, it is most definitely not based on Aikido's Shiho-Nage. My first thought was a backroll throw(can't remember the proper name atm) but it doesn't fit the description that well.

Any ideas? It sounds like an interesting technique and I'd like to look into it more, but, the author of the writing isn't available to me to ask.
Out of curiosity, what book is it?
 

drop bear

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I had thought of these, but, it's the part where the author says "The Four Corner throw is usually done straight up" that throws me. I keep picturing that move they do in professional wrestling where they toss someone up and over them. Which obviously isn't going to work without the other person jumping to assist.
 

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geezer

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I never thought to look at it that way.

And, yeah, the distance thing is just fluff.
Normally, fiction is just that, fiction! Unless the author is also an accomplished martial artist and is clearly basing his/her combat accounts on real-world training and experience.

For example, an FMA coach I know once trained under a well known teacher of Pekiti Tirsia named Bill McGrath. McGrath is also an author of several fictional novels that include combat descriptions which are based on his experience in the martial arts. I have not studied the Pekiti system, and have not read the novels mentioned, but in this example, I can see why someone might actually want to "reconstruct" the techniques described.

Otherwise, if the novel is simply fantasy-fiction that's not written by someone with significant martial knowledge, why would you bother? So the question is, what is the book you are referring to, who is the author, and what is their martial arts expertise?
 

Flying Crane

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Anyone ever read the Samurai Cat series by Mark E. Rogers? There are some interesting sword techniques described in there.

The protagonist is Miowara Tomokato, a ronin samurai out to avenge the death of his lord.
 
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Duck76

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Normally, fiction is just that, fiction! Unless the author is also an accomplished martial artist and is clearly basing his/her combat accounts on real-world training and experience.

For example, an FMA coach I know once trained under a well known teacher of Pekiti Tirsia named Bill McGrath. McGrath is also an author of several fictional novels that include combat descriptions which are based on his experience in the martial arts. I have not studied the Pekiti system, and have not read the novels mentioned, but in this example, I can see why someone might actually want to "reconstruct" the techniques described.

Otherwise, if the novel is simply fantasy-fiction that's not written by someone with significant martial knowledge, why would you bother? So the question is, what is the book you are referring to, who is the author, and what is their martial arts expertise?
I'm not sure of the author's martial arts experience, but, pretty much everything about the fictional style seems to be straight from tai chi chuan. There's a couple of things that seem more Aikido related, but, for the most part, all Tai Chi.
 

geezer

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I'm not sure of the author's martial arts experience, but, pretty much everything about the fictional style seems to be straight from tai chi chuan. There's a couple of things that seem more Aikido related, but, for the most part, all Tai Chi.
Based on Tai Chi and/or Aikido ...and you can't figure it out? Do you actually train either of those arts?

And even then, people can have trained Tai Chi for a very long time and still don't have it figured out! Ask Xue (who posts here). He knows a fair bit about Tai Chi.
 

lklawson

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Normally, fiction is just that, fiction! Unless the author is also an accomplished martial artist and is clearly basing his/her combat accounts on real-world training and experience.

For example, an FMA coach I know once trained under a well known teacher of Pekiti Tirsia named Bill McGrath. McGrath is also an author of several fictional novels that include combat descriptions which are based on his experience in the martial arts. I have not studied the Pekiti system, and have not read the novels mentioned, but in this example, I can see why someone might actually want to "reconstruct" the techniques described.

Otherwise, if the novel is simply fantasy-fiction that's not written by someone with significant martial knowledge, why would you bother? So the question is, what is the book you are referring to, who is the author, and what is their martial arts expertise?
You know when an author has real training, such as Larry Correia with his Monster Hunter International series.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I'm not sure of the author's martial arts experience, but, pretty much everything about the fictional style seems to be straight from tai chi chuan. There's a couple of things that seem more Aikido related, but, for the most part, all Tai Chi.
What book is it? It's my curiosity, but also may help provide an answer.
 
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