Training after heart surgery

zenfrog

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I have been a martial art student for 4 decades. I've always enjoyed training and learning but recently I've had an unexpected heart attack. Subsequently, I've had multiple bypass surgery. I am getting better and am eager to get back into some sort of training. Nothing hard that would possibly make my condition worse. Has anyone had any experience with this or a similar situation?
Thanks
 

Dirty Dog

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I have been a martial art student for 4 decades. I've always enjoyed training and learning but recently I've had an unexpected heart attack. Subsequently, I've had multiple bypass surgery. I am getting better and am eager to get back into some sort of training. Nothing hard that would possibly make my condition worse. Has anyone had any experience with this or a similar situation?
Thanks
Tons of people. Start by talking to your cardiologist. Typically people who have had a CABG (pretty rare these days, the vast majority are stented) would be in a cardiac rehab program where you are monitored during exercise. When your cardiologist decides you're ready for unmonitored exercise, they will release you. If you plan on doing any sparring, that needs to be specifically mentioned, because of your sternotomy.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I know a few people who have continued training after having a heart attack, and their doctors actually encourage it. That said, the important thing there is that their doctors encourage it; depending on how badly the heart attack was and where you are in your recovery it may be a bad idea or not. Also depending on how hard you go at your style (doing full contact kickboxing would be very different than no-contact tai chi and either way the contact level should be mentioned to your doctor. Also falls may have an impact striking does not or vice versa).
 

Olde Phart

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I had triple bypass surgery in Nov, 2020. I'm now 67, and started martial arts training (again) at 64 with my granddaughters. Was at Red belt/Black stripe level (one step shy of my black belt) when I had the surgery. Miracle of miracles: they caught the blockage before I had a heart attack! I had to take basically a year off from full participation in martial arts. Waited about 4 months before I started working out lightly in class. It was a year before I chanced letting anyone throw me. My instructor was completely behind my ideas about a slow return. Got my black belt in April of this year. I still lack the "air" to participate at full steam for long periods of time. The martial arts federation I learn under allowed me to do the forms part of the test at a different time than the others. With just the judge, my instructor and myself present, I could take short breaks between each one (there were 12!) I made it through. Later, with the group, was able to demonstrate the various kicks, punches, throws, etc. CABG surgery usually has COPD attached to it so your "air supply" for strenuous exercise may limit your participation for a bit. As someone suggested already . . . check with your cardiologist and personal care physician before "getting back to it." They'll be happy for you to have the desire since exercise will be key to your keeping healthy for a few more years.
 

Alan0354

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Ask your doctor, too much liability for anyone else to give advice here. I know what I would do, but I am not going to tell people to do what I would do, I only know my body. This is serious stuff.
 
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zenfrog

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Tons of people. Start by talking to your cardiologist. Typically people who have had a CABG (pretty rare these days, the vast majority are stented) would be in a cardiac rehab program where you are monitored during exercise. When your cardiologist decides you're ready for unmonitored exercise, they will release you. If you plan on doing any sparring, that needs to be specifically mentioned, because of your sternotomy.
Thanks for the advice.
 
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zenfrog

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I had triple bypass surgery in Nov, 2020. I'm now 67, and started martial arts training (again) at 64 with my granddaughters. Was at Red belt/Black stripe level (one step shy of my black belt) when I had the surgery. Miracle of miracles: they caught the blockage before I had a heart attack! I had to take basically a year off from full participation in martial arts. Waited about 4 months before I started working out lightly in class. It was a year before I chanced letting anyone throw me. My instructor was completely behind my ideas about a slow return. Got my black belt in April of this year. I still lack the "air" to participate at full steam for long periods of time. The martial arts federation I learn under allowed me to do the forms part of the test at a different time than the others. With just the judge, my instructor and myself present, I could take short breaks between each one (there were 12!) I made it through. Later, with the group, was able to demonstrate the various kicks, punches, throws, etc. CABG surgery usually has COPD attached to it so your "air supply" for strenuous exercise may limit your participation for a bit. As someone suggested already . . . check with your cardiologist and personal care physician before "getting back to it." They'll be happy for you to have the desire since exercise will be key to your keeping healthy for a few more years.
Yeah, I got to take it slow until complete healing. Or as close to complete healing as can be. Thanks
 

Dirty Dog

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ICABG surgery usually has COPD attached to it so your "air supply" for strenuous exercise may limit your participation for a bit.
This statement is incorrect. While it is not at all unusual for people to have both coronary artery disease and COPD, one doesn't cause the other. And certainly a CABG to treat the CAD won't cause COPD. They are commonly seen together because they have share certain risk factors, like smoking.
 
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zenfrog

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I know a few people who have continued training after having a heart attack, and their doctors actually encourage it. That said, the important thing there is that their doctors encourage it; depending on how badly the heart attack was and where you are in your recovery it may be a bad idea or not. Also depending on how hard you go at your style (doing full contact kickboxing would be very different than no-contact tai chi and either way the contact level should be mentioned to your doctor. Also falls may have an impact striking does not or vice versa).
I mostly do a "mix" of styles/systems I've trained over the years. Not going to be doing throws or ne waza anytime soon. I do quite of bit of tai chi chuan/chi kung. Really missing sensitivity/ reflex drills. Not going to be doing much more than very light hands for a while I suppose. Thanks
 

Olde Phart

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This statement is incorrect. While it is not at all unusual for people to have both coronary artery disease and COPD, one doesn't cause the other. And certainly a CABG to treat the CAD won't cause COPD. They are commonly seen together because they have share certain risk factors, like smoking.
Never said one caused the other. But, you agree with me that it is more "usual" than "unusual" for them to occur at the same time. Age has a lot to do with it.
 

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