TKD & Multiple Attackers (In reference to a quote by Exile)

matt.m

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just a quick comment. A wrist throw against one opponent with a side kick for instance is not a hard thing to accomplish. Well, that is upper belt hapkido combination kind of goodies.........however, it is up to the student to put 1 and 1 together while practicing reps of the technique. That is just an example, I could go on but I won't.
 
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foot2face

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A wrist throw against one opponent with a side kick for instance is not a hard thing to accomplish.
Do you mean at the same time?


Well, that is upper belt hapkido combination kind of goodies.........however, it is up to the student to put 1 and 1 together while practicing reps of the technique.
Does Hapkido have techniques that are specifically meant to deal with multiple attackers simultaneously?


That is just an example, I could go on but I won't.
Please do.
 
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foot2face

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The same way we train for single attackers - using techniques from patterns for step sparring, pre-arranged sparring, semi-free sparring, and then free sparring. There are techniques that can be used for multiple attackers as low as yellow belt, although there are more as you progress through the ranks. Like other difficult techniques, training in this begins well below the level at which it is required - I usually introduce the concept formally to red belts, although 2 on 1 sparring isn't required for testing until II Dan.

Here's an example, I think, of what you're trying to find out: one of the gentlemen who tested last weekend for VI Dan based his specialty demonstration on one particular pattern, Ko-Dang. He started by performing the pattern alone; then he performed the pattern again with 4 attackers in a preset routine, modifying the techniques sufficiently to be effective for the angle of the attackers - we started with 1 in front, 1 behind, and 2 45 degrees off the front, although we moved around throughout the pattern, staying in the same general positions of front, back, and sides; then he performed the pattern again in a semi-free sparring format (you know who's attacking and when, but not with what) with three attackers. Finally, he demonstrated 6 on 1 free sparring, using only techniques from the pattern for defense and offense.
kacey, it seem that your system relies heavily on applications of your patterns. Are there special tactics or strategies that you apply to the boon hae that allow you to use them against multiple attackers?
 

Kacey

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kacey, it seem that your system relies heavily on applications of your patterns. Are there special tactics or strategies that you apply to the boon hae that allow you to use them against multiple attackers?

Patterns are the tool kit; applications come from the available tools. Some of the movements in the patterns are intended for, or can be easily adapted for, multiple attackers - starting as low as yellow belt, although that application isn't always taught to yellow belts. Since I've never taken any other style, it's hard for me to compare/contrast between what we do, or determine what we do that would be considered "special tactics or strategies" - because to me, it's not special; it's just what we do. I'm sorry if this isn't helpful, but it's the best I can do at the moment. I'll try to think about it... but when it's what you're used to, it's not special, it just is.
 

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