The layered bunkai theory is stupid

Kung Fu Wang

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Stay in a right lead for a while, giving the opponent time to plan an attack to all the juicy targets on your inside. Then, just before he attacks you switch stances to left lead.
When you switch from "uniform stance" into "mirror stance", your opponent's leading leg side kick, or his back leg roundhouse kick can kick on your chest/belly. You may not have enough time to switch back to "uniform stance" again.

 

JowGaWolf

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A lot has to line up for you to get to that point. So, maybe you have a lot of consistency when you get there, but that's like saying there's only so many responses when you hit someone hard on the left side of the head - that only matters if you can get that punch to land hard on that side of their head.
In reality there is only a limited number of ways to respond to the initial strike. It is the follow up strikes that become less reliable in terms of how your will trigger a response. This is why it's important to be able to see the opportunity that you opponent gives vs trying to plan a combo. Exploit the opportunity that your opponent is willing to give. Where Wang sees his opponent blocking his puch a negative, I see it as an opportunity.

I personally think that developing combos based on if the strike lands is not a good way to increase stance. Combos should be based on reaction regardless if the strike lands.
This same effect can be achieved by merely switching stance. Stay in a right lead for a while, giving the opponent time to plan an attack to all the juicy targets on your inside. Then, just before he attacks you switch stances to left lead. Now his preset targets are gone and he suddenly faces a new tactical situation to ponder. Using this, and the tactic you described, a few times can be frustrating to the opponent and throw him off his game. He may not even know he's being led and manipulated. Many wives are naturally skilled at this.
Correct about stance on both accounts. Lol.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Where Wang sees his opponent blocking his puch a negative, I see it as an opportunity.

Combos should be based on reaction regardless if the strike lands.
I don't see my opponent's blocking is negative. If my opponent

- can block my punch, that means he is as fast as I'm.
- blocks into the thin air, that means I'm faster than him. I enjoy of doing that very much.

This is why the 2nd move of my combo should depend on my opponent's respond. I try to block his blocking arm the same direction (borrow force). In other words, I try to help my opponent's blocking arm to move more than he wants to. Of course, his blocking has to block into the thin air first.
 
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Gerry Seymour

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When you switch from "uniform stance" into "mirror stance", your opponent's leading leg side kick, or his back leg roundhouse kick can kick on your chest/belly. You may not have enough time to switch back to "uniform stance" again.

Every stance has compromises. And that mirror stance also makes room for delivering the kicks you mention.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Every stance has compromises. And that mirror stance also makes room for delivering the kicks you mention.
But if you don't train roundhouse kick, you won't be able to recognize that opportunity. This is why style is not important, but what tools that you have in your toolbox is more important.

When a single leg opportunity arrives, if you don't train single leg, that opportunity won't do you any good.
 

isshinryuronin

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But if you don't train roundhouse kick, you won't be able to recognize that opportunity. This is why style is not important, but what tools that you have in your toolbox is more important.

When a single leg opportunity arrives, if you don't train single leg, that opportunity won't do you any good.
Recognizing opportunity when it comes knocking on your door is absolutely one of the most important talents one can have. "The time to strike is when the opportunity presents itself." (From isshinryu's Code of Karate, adapted from the Eight Principles of Quan Fa.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Recognizing opportunity when it comes knocking on your door is absolutely one of the most important talents one can have. "The time to strike is when the opportunity presents itself." (From isshinryu's Code of Karate, adapted from the Eight Principles of Quan Fa.
One time in sparring, my opponent stood in a bow-arrow stance with left foot forward and right punch (I didn't know why he wanted to use that as his fighting stance). My teacher was watching my sparring. He told me, "Spring". I grabbed/pulled his right arm, spring his left leg (both were close to me) and took him down. My opponent didn't know that to put his opposite sides leg and arm forward was dangerous to him.

In the following picture, if you pull his left arm to your right, and sweep his left leg to your left, you can take him down effortlessly. The issue is can you recognize that opportunity?

Karate_stance.jpg
 
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