Tekki Shodan

tshadowchaser

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Founding Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 29, 2001
Messages
13,460
Reaction score
732
Location
Athol, Ma. USA
I asked this in another thtread but I am going to ask it here also in case some of you only read the Korean threads.

For those that have crossed trained or just studied some of the other "KARATE" systems is there a form in TKD that is simular to Tekki Shodan? Many years ago when I studied the Korean systems I recall doing a form that was verry simular but I cant remember what it was. I'm not even sure my instructor at the time may not have just shownit to me to exoose me to other arts.
ANy help onthis would be appreciated. If it dose still exsist can we disect it as to its defesive nature and what the moves represent.
Shadow:asian:
 

karatekid1975

Master Black Belt
Joined
Apr 1, 2002
Messages
1,417
Reaction score
2
Location
Rochester area, NY
When I did TSD, they did Naihanchi (sp?). It's the same as Tekki. If I remember right (I didn't stay in TSD long enough to actually learn these series of forms, so I could be wrong), Naihanchi is supposed to be as if you are fighting against a wall with a series of blocks and strikes, going side to side.

This is what you are looking for, right? Did you do Tae Kwon Do Moo Duk Kwon? I do TKD now, but they don't do any forms that are like tekki/Naihanchi. I do WTF.
 
OP
tshadowchaser

tshadowchaser

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Founding Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 29, 2001
Messages
13,460
Reaction score
732
Location
Athol, Ma. USA
Yes I was in TKDMDK for a couple of years. My instructor at the time was a 2nd generation under YEE MO ARN (SP) out of texas directly under MR. Santamaria (SP) sorry about the spellings its been a long time.
Shadow
 

Chris from CT

Purple Belt
Joined
Mar 4, 2002
Messages
302
Reaction score
10
Location
Connecticut, USA
Hey, Shadow.
The Korean name for Tekki / Naihanchi is "Chulgi." I had to learn it too. It's kind of cool about the slight variations in it when taught in a Kempo, Hapkido and a TSD system.

Take care.
 
R

RyuShiKan

Guest
Originally posted by karatekid1975

When I did TSD, they did Naihanchi (sp?). It's the same as Tekki. If I remember right (I didn't stay in TSD long enough to actually learn these series of forms, so I could be wrong), Naihanchi is supposed to be as if you are fighting against a wall with a series of blocks and strikes, going side to side.

This is what you are looking for, right? Did you do Tae Kwon Do Moo Duk Kwon? I do TKD now, but they don't do any forms that are like tekki/Naihanchi. I do WTF.


By TSD I am guessing you mean Tang Soo Do......

The kanji for Tang Soo Do are the exact same as the old style kanji to write Karate with the Tang (China) /Kara kanji and the Shou/Te (hand) kanji. This was the old way to write Karate on Okinawa..........some people still use it.
Therefore it is no surprise that they do Naihanchi.
 

karatekid1975

Master Black Belt
Joined
Apr 1, 2002
Messages
1,417
Reaction score
2
Location
Rochester area, NY
Ryu, that's right. Yes I mean Tang Soo Do :) They do still use it.

Hey, Chris. Long time no chat :) Anyways, yes, they are so similar. And Chulgi was the name I was looking for for the TKD version. Thanks :) I hope tshadow was too.

Tshadow, if you did TKD MDK, they do the chulgi/Naihanchi. They prolly did the pyung ahn, and Bassai's too. Prolly under different names though. I did Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan, and they are both very similar styles. Some of the term is different, though.
 
F

fissure

Guest
It's been a long time since a practiced shotokan, but if I remember correctly the Tekki forms were all lateral movements using horse riding stances , elbows, foot stomp, ect. If this is right, then you might want to look into Pyongwon, the 4th. Dan WTF form.
:EG:
 
F

fissure

Guest
Again, if the above description is reminisent of Tekki (last time I trained in Shotokan was 16 yrs ago!), then yes. I'm a 2nd Dan in TKD, and have been for about 8 yrs ( probably time to test again). But since the WTF only has one officall poomse per Dan ranking in is not difficult to practise several "higher" forms.I like pyongwon very much, the ppattern of the form is very "clean" - it has a simplicity and practicality that I find very pleasing.
As you can see, I hold a very low rank when it comes to spelling!
:EG:
 
Y

Yossarian75

Guest
There is an ITF form called Po-Eun which looks like it may be inspired by the Naihanchi series, it seems to share some of the same moves. Ive also noticed how some of the mid level ITF poomse resemble the Pyung Ahns/Heians/Pinans.

You can find a vid of it at this link(pyongwon too)

http://users.ev1.net/~D.McHenry/forms/index.htm
 
S

Shinzu

Guest
not to get off the subject, but tekki shodan, nidan, and sandan are almost exactly like niahanchi cho dan, e dan, and sam dan in TSD. there are a few variations but nothing major. i am not familiar with the TKD MDK so i would not be able to comment on that..sorry :(
 
A

Angus

Guest
I don't know much about the forms in question (though I do know some of the TKD forms because we used them in Karate), but I do know one thing: Good lord the guy who performs the ITF forms looks horrible. Based on his pants, he must be 4th dan or above...I don't know how. What a terrible representation of their forms!
 

Marginal

Senior Master
Joined
Jul 7, 2002
Messages
3,276
Reaction score
67
Location
Colorado
Looked mostly like he was trying to illustrate the particular moves in each one rather than paying attention to what speed the moves were supposed to be performed in each pattern. No attention was put on performing continous motions, fast motions etc correctly.
 
D

Dim Mak

Guest
Hello,

The Naihanchi forms originate from Okinawa and translate to, "Fighting Holding Your Ground." The earliest records I could find of this being taught is by Sokon (Bushi) Matsumura (1797-1889).

This form was later taught in Japan and called "Tekki," which roughly means, "Iron Horse." This is probably because Yasutsune "Anko" Itosu (1830-1915) of Okinawa, student of Matsumura above, was famous for having a high level of skill in these forms, and gained the nickname of "Iron Horse." He was one of the first to publicly demonstrate karate in Okinawa, which is where these forms were first openly shown. Itosu is credited with creation of the third "Iron Horse" form, Tekki Sam Dan -in Japanese.

Koreans that studied karate during the Japanese Occupation in Japan or elsewhere, then returned to Korea and called these forms, "Chulki," - the Korean translation of "Tekki."

These forms can also be called "Kema," i.e. Kema Cho Dan.

Following WWII, there were five major schools of Tang Soo Do or Kong Soo Do that emerged in Korea. Most taught some form of the "Chulki" forms in the early days before the govt. push to unify Korean MA into one organization

Choi Hong Hi studied karate in Japan, so it's expected that the forms he created in 1950 (ITF forms) have similar movements to karate.

Sincerely,

R. McLain
 
Top