naihanchi/tekki

ppko

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Naihanchi (ナイハンチ, Naihanchi?) (or Naifanchi (ナイファンチ, Naifanchi?), Tekki (鉄騎, Tekki?)) is a karate Kata, performed in straddle stance (naihanchi-dachi (ナイハンチ立ち, naihanchi-dachi?) / kiba-dachi (騎馬立ち, kiba-dachi?)). It translates to 'internal divided conflict'. The form makes use of in-fighting techniques (i.e. tai sabaki (body evasion)) and grappling. There are three modern kata derived from this (Shodan, Nidan and Sandan). Some researchers believe Nidan and Sandan were created by Anko Itosu, but others believe that it was originally one kata broken into three separate parts (probably due to constraints of space). The fact that only Naihanchi/Tekki Shodan has a formal opening suggests the kata was split.
It has been suggested the kata was originally developed when fighting against a wall / ledge / narrow confined space which is unlikely; however it could be used for this purpose. Whilst the kata is linear, moving side to side, the techniques can be applied against attackers at any angle. The side to side movements in a low stance build up the necessary balance and strength for fast footwork and body shifting. The kata are intricate strategies of attacking and defensive movement, done in the kiba dachi, for the purpose of conditioning the legs to develop explosive power. If one rotates one's torso a few degrees to one side or the other while performing Naihanchi/Tekki, the result is the Hachi-monji, or figure eight stance. This has been called the basics of all karate[citation needed]. Some researchers believe the form is a non-ballistic two-man grappling exercise.



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History

Itosu is reported to have learned the kata from Sokon Matsumura, who learned it from a Chinese man living in Tomari. Itosu is thought to have changed the original kata. The form is so important to old style karate that Kentsu Yabu (a student of Itosu) often told his students ‘Karate begins and ends with Naihanchi’ and admonished his students must practice the kata 10,000 times to make it their own. Before Itosu created the Pinan (Heian) kata, Naihanchi would traditionally be taught first in Tomari-te and Shuri-te schools, which indicates its importance. Gichin Funakoshi learned the kata from Anko Asato. Funakoshi renamed the kata Tekki (Iron Horse) in reference to his old teacher, Itosu, and the forms power.

Motobu's Naihanchi


The oldest known reference to Naihanchi are in the books of Motobu Choki. He states the kata was imported from China, but is no longer practiced there. Motobu learned the kata from Sokon Matsumura, Sakuma Pechin, Anko Itosu and Kosaku Matsumura. Motobu taught his own interpretation of Naihanchi, which included te (Okinawan form of martial arts which predates karate) like grappling and throwing techniques.
In the earlier days of karate training, it was common practice for a student to spend 2-3 years doing nothing but Naihanchi/Tekki, under the strict observation of their teacher. Motobu Choki, famous for his youthful brawling at tsuji (red-light district), credited the kata with containing all that one needs to know to become a proficient fighter.
The Tekki series of kata were renamed by Funakoshi from the Naihanchi kata, which were derived from an older, original kata, Nifanchin.[1] Nifanchin was brought to Okinawa via Fuzhou, China, at some point in the long history of trade between the two kingdoms. It was broken into three distinct segments, possibly by Anko Itosu, Tokumine Pechin, or Motobu Choki. The kata are performed entirely in Kiba dachi ("Horse stance"). The name Tekki itself (and Nifanchin) translates to "Iron Horse." Tekki Shodan (鉄騎初段), literally meaning "Iron Horse Riding, First Level", is the first of the series, followed by Tekki nidan and Tekki sandan.
In the 1960’s a kung fu practitioner, Daichi Kaneko, studied a form of Taiwanese White Crane Boxing, known as Dan Qiu Ban Bai He Quan (Half Hillock, Half White Crane Boxing). Kaneko, an acupuncturist who lived in Yonabaru, Okinawa, taught a form called Neixi (inside knee) in Mandarin. This form includes the same sweeping action found in the nami-gaeshi (returning wave) technique of Naihanchi. Neixi is pronounced Nohanchi in Fuzhou dialect, which could indicate Neixi is the forerunner to Naihanchi.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_the_GNU_Free_Documentation_License
 
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ppko

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I got this article from wikipedia, I love the kata and have actually made the three kata the only requirements in my school. The katas are so diverse and the breakdowns can be so many that its impossible to truly master all parts of the kata so that is why I made the threee naihanchis the only requirement.
Just wandering what your oppinions on this article and on what I have done.
 

stoneheart

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I think using only Naihanchi for your requirements is far too limiting. While it is true that the old masters likely only knew a few kata, I think modern students want and need more stimulation to keep their attention.

Naihanchi contains no yokogeri. Does this mean you don't teach yokogeri at all?
 

Tez3

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I have been told that Naihanchi is the 'perfect' kata, the one that has everything in it to win a fight. I love the Wado version of it but do the TSD version at the moment which has less moves.

I think it depends on which katas you chose for your three to to learn, if it were Wado I think I'd chose Pinan Shodan, Kushanku and Naihanchi. On both styles I do we teach a great many techniques that aren't in any kata so I don't think any instructor would limit what he taught to just what is in the kata. if I read ppko correctly they are saying they are choosing to do just three kata not just teaching in class the techniques from those kata.

I'd say if it works for you do it! Which style do you do?
 
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ppko

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I think using only Naihanchi for your requirements is far too limiting. While it is true that the old masters likely only knew a few kata, I think modern students want and need more stimulation to keep their attention.
I dont believe that Naihanchi is limiting at all. Truly most people only see the one angle of naihanchi but if done with a slight variation it incorporates all stances, and if you change your angles of attack you just opened a whole new world of opportunity. I agree that kids probably do need more stimulation, thats part of the reason why I only teach adults, that and I dont consider myself a good kids teacher just because I do keep things somewhat to complex for a child.

Naihanchi contains no yokogeri. Does this mean you don't teach yokogeri at all?
On the contrary the movements where you are lifting your legs and turning your head if you realy look at that movement it is both a seisan kick and a side kick
 
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ppko

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I have been told that Naihanchi is the 'perfect' kata, the one that has everything in it to win a fight. I love the Wado version of it but do the TSD version at the moment which has less moves.

I think it depends on which katas you chose for your three to to learn, if it were Wado I think I'd chose Pinan Shodan, Kushanku and Naihanchi. On both styles I do we teach a great many techniques that aren't in any kata so I don't think any instructor would limit what he taught to just what is in the kata. if I read ppko correctly they are saying they are choosing to do just three kata not just teaching in class the techniques from those kata.

I'd say if it works for you do it! Which style do you do?
You are very correct in the fact that I do teach more, but I also tell my students to look for the movement in naihanchi they may see something I dont. I do ryukyu kempo
 

stoneheart

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On the contrary the movements where you are lifting your legs and turning your head if you realy look at that movement it is both a seisan kick and a side kick

Ah, I see you're from the extremely open-ended interpretation school of thought which is fine. Infinite possibilities from a single kata...

I myself prefer to use different kata to teach different lessons.
 

Kosho Gakkusei

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Ah, I see you're from the extremely open-ended interpretation school of thought which is fine. Infinite possibilities from a single kata...

I myself prefer to use different kata to teach different lessons.

I agree with both of you. I believe in infinite possibilities in each Kata but I also believe that each Kata teaches a different lesson - usually the lesson corresponds to the name. The art I study has 29 empty hand Kata. I see the value in both breadth & depth of knowledge, when it comes to Kata but if forced to choose I'd pick depth.

_Don Flatt
 
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ppko

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I agree with both of you. I believe in infinite possibilities in each Kata but I also believe that each Kata teaches a different lesson - usually the lesson corresponds to the name. The art I study has 29 empty hand Kata. I see the value in both breadth & depth of knowledge, when it comes to Kata but if forced to choose I'd pick depth.

_Don Flatt
which way do you see depth
 
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ppko

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Ah, I see you're from the extremely open-ended interpretation school of thought which is fine. Infinite possibilities from a single kata...

I myself prefer to use different kata to teach different lessons.
Yes sir, but I also see several different kata out of just one kata once I get done filming the different versions of naihanchi shodan as I see them I will try to post them here
 

Kosho Gakkusei

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which way do you see depth
Taking time to look beyond the surface of the form, exploring possibilities, applying movements as blocks or parries or checks or strikes or throws or evasions or trips or sweeps, changing directions or angles, & experimenting with different attacks, situations, & attackers.
Yes sir, but I also see several different kata out of just one kata once I get done filming the different versions of naihanchi shodan as I see them I will try to post them here
That would be awesome. Naihanchi Shodan is one of my favorites.

_Don Flatt
 
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ppko

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Taking time to look beyond the surface of the form, exploring possibilities, applying movements as blocks or parries or checks or strikes or throws or evasions or trips or sweeps, changing directions or angles, & experimenting with different attacks, situations, & attackers.

That would be awesome. Naihanchi Shodan is one of my favorites.

_Don Flatt
Ok so not more forms but being further in depth with the form/forms you know
 

chinto

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I got this article from wikipedia, I love the kata and have actually made the three kata the only requirements in my school. The katas are so diverse and the breakdowns can be so many that its impossible to truly master all parts of the kata so that is why I made the threee naihanchis the only requirement.
Just wandering what your oppinions on this article and on what I have done.
the Neihanchi kata are great kata, but I would encuridge you to look at including Seisan and perhaps some others.. there is so much in any of the old school kata from Okinawa like Neihanchi kata that it is mind boggling!
by the way the neihanchi stance used in that photo is a tamari version. the shuri version I have seen has the toes in a bit more and the knees turned in slightly..( ala matsumura seito)
 

chinto

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I have been told that Naihanchi is the 'perfect' kata, the one that has everything in it to win a fight. I love the Wado version of it but do the TSD version at the moment which has less moves.

I think it depends on which katas you chose for your three to to learn, if it were Wado I think I'd chose Pinan Shodan, Kushanku and Naihanchi. On both styles I do we teach a great many techniques that aren't in any kata so I don't think any instructor would limit what he taught to just what is in the kata. if I read ppko correctly they are saying they are choosing to do just three kata not just teaching in class the techniques from those kata.

I'd say if it works for you do it! Which style do you do?


I have to say i would add to naihanchi katas , Seisan, annanku, chinto and gojushiho and passai and kusanku minumum myself. but then that is part of the silibous of the style I study myself. but Bushi Matsumura knew seisan and naihanchi kata and wanchu and annanku and kusanku and passai.. it does increase your versitility a bit..
 

chinto

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I agree with both of you. I believe in infinite possibilities in each Kata but I also believe that each Kata teaches a different lesson - usually the lesson corresponds to the name. The art I study has 29 empty hand Kata. I see the value in both breadth & depth of knowledge, when it comes to Kata but if forced to choose I'd pick depth.

_Don Flatt


wow that is a lot of empty hand kata! or are they all empty hand kata?

what style do you study?
 
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ppko

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the Neihanchi kata are great kata, but I would encuridge you to look at including Seisan and perhaps some others.. there is so much in any of the old school kata from Okinawa like Neihanchi kata that it is mind boggling!
by the way the neihanchi stance used in that photo is a tamari version. the shuri version I have seen has the toes in a bit more and the knees turned in slightly..( ala matsumura seito)
I know the other kata as well I am just trying to get my students to be able to master these if they want to learn more I am willing to teach them more but right now they are very excited with how diverse naihanchi is
 

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wow that is a lot of empty hand kata! or are they all empty hand kata?

what style do you study?

I agree it's alot of Kata. Yes, they are all empty hand. We also have a six part Jo staff Kata & about 15 Katana Kata taken from Iai. Thankfully, the Iai Kata are real short.

I study Kosho Shorei. There are 6 Kata's developed by our current Hanshi and 5 from the Late Grand Master. A number of Kyokoshin Kata were included to reflect the period of our history where these Kata were shared with and studied by students of our art. The Pinan, Naihanchi, Kusanku, Passai, Empi, & Gankaku specifically. Juchnik Hanshi added one Kata from Shuri-Ryu to reflect the influence and friendship of Grandmaster Robert Trias. Hanshi also included Ju Ni Ippon Shodan, Nidan, & Sandan as beginer forms at the request of Trias Sensei. Thankfully again, the beginner forms are identical except each utilizes a different block.

I can see the usefulness of all of the Kata we study - they each teach something different but I also can see studying each of them for years (even the more basic) and not exhausting them. I guess I'm going to be busy with this for a real long time.

_Don Flatt
 

chinto

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I know the other kata as well I am just trying to get my students to be able to master these if they want to learn more I am willing to teach them more but right now they are very excited with how diverse naihanchi is


well that is very cool that htey are excited and looking at bunkai for the kata! I guess I got the impression that you did not teach other kata some how.. that seemed kinda strange, but it was what it sounded like to me..
 

chinto

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I agree it's alot of Kata. Yes, they are all empty hand. We also have a six part Jo staff Kata & about 15 Katana Kata taken from Iai. Thankfully, the Iai Kata are real short.

I study Kosho Shorei. There are 6 Kata's developed by our current Hanshi and 5 from the Late Grand Master. A number of Kyokoshin Kata were included to reflect the period of our history where these Kata were shared with and studied by students of our art. The Pinan, Naihanchi, Kusanku, Passai, Empi, & Gankaku specifically. Juchnik Hanshi added one Kata from Shuri-Ryu to reflect the influence and friendship of Grandmaster Robert Trias. Hanshi also included Ju Ni Ippon Shodan, Nidan, & Sandan as beginer forms at the request of Trias Sensei. Thankfully again, the beginner forms are identical except each utilizes a different block.

I can see the usefulness of all of the Kata we study - they each teach something different but I also can see studying each of them for years (even the more basic) and not exhausting them. I guess I'm going to be busy with this for a real long time.

_Don Flatt

ok, sounds cool.

in the style I study to test for shodan-ho you have to know all our empty hand kata and have them polished, and also know several weapons kata from kobujitsu/kobudo.
 
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