Sparring Drills

MJS

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Lets here 'em folks! What are some of your favorite sparring drills/techniques? This can include both offensive and defensive moves.:ultracool

Mike
 

CuongNhuka

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That would be what in Wing Chun is called pac dar. One hand enters in and does what is essentially a palm strike to the oppents arm. This is your pac sao, meaning slapping, or pushing hand. The other hand comes in striaght over and punches. This is your dar hand, meaning attack, And can acctuly be any form of attack, but is almost always a punch. The pac is normally aimed at the fore arm, just before the hand. In free sparring it goes to the upper arm. Right between elbow and shoulder. The punch goes to the center of the chest in Wing Chun, and to the head in sparring

Aside from that I'd have to say it would be lap sao. This is anouther Wing Chun drill. Though this one is a little more complex and will definitly get you kicked out of a tornament. One hand (I'll use the left for ease of mind) goes to what is called bong sao (brocken wing arm). This is done by raising your left arm so the upper arm is just below being parallel to the floor. The fore arm is held at about a 120 degree angle, with the hand simply left to hang. The arm should as relaxed as possible. The right hand should be held back and ready.
When the strike comes in, assume the bong sao position, and with your right hand grabb the strikeing arm at the wrist, and pull it to your hip. Your left slams into their chest. In the Wing Chun drills the arm you just pulled down would go to bong sao, and he/she does the lap sao drill back. And it goes on. In sparring, you could at a twist on a 45 degree angle, and that makes it not only more effective, but a little annonying. How ever both of these drills require a great deal of training and practice. So, sign up for a Wing Chun class in your area to learn these
 

Don Roley

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Here is a simple semi- sparring drill for those that do one- step moves.

Do the attack and respond to it as is expected. Then after a while, have the person in the position as an attacker add (if they want) an additional attack of their choice after the end of the drill. The person doing the technique then can respond any way they want. No moves beyond that by either side.

It is not a full out sparring match. But it does get the person doing a set drill to expect and train for a continuation of an attack instead of dropping their guard at the "end" of the drill.
 

jdinca

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Ever spar in slow motion? Try sparring at 25% speed, with the goal to be looking for openings. It's a great way to train the eyes, it's also a great way to develop patience and control.
 

still learning

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Hello, Sparring drills are great tools. But there are rules and not done with hard,full speed, contact fighing. Plus in a friendly enviroment. Sparring has it place for training.


Real fighting is NO rules, anything goes, NO such thing as fair fighting, FULL Speed and None Stop. Plus many times you do not know the attacker and what there knowledge of fighting skills are,( carrying any guns or knife?) , Plus if they have any friends behind you? on the side of you? or if any have access to use anything around them for weapons to be use against you?

One of my flavorite drills is ? ....UM? Running. (poke the eyes before or when it is available to reach) throat strikes...(off course not for real in sparring)

Remember sparring is very different from real fighting....but it helps you learn a few things...........Aloha
 

Xue Sheng

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Here is a simple semi- sparring drill for those that do one- step moves.

Do the attack and respond to it as is expected. Then after a while, have the person in the position as an attacker add (if they want) an additional attack of their choice after the end of the drill. The person doing the technique then can respond any way they want. No moves beyond that by either side.

It is not a full out sparring match. But it does get the person doing a set drill to expect and train for a continuation of an attack instead of dropping their guard at the "end" of the drill.

This is similar to something we do in Yang Tai Chi, but it may not be from the Yang family it is likely form Tung Ying Chieh.

It is a one step push hands drill. It is something between push hands and actual free style push hands.

It starts with 2 handed stationary then someone advances when they see an opportunity and thee other does what is needed to redirect, defend or attack. And it continues. It gets rather fast paced after you have done it for awhile but it is not dine at full power so it is still just a drill.

There is also a 1 handed moving drill to train stick, sticky and follow that is pretty net too. But there is no stepping pattern. You just have to maintain hand contact and keep your hand moving in a horizontal circular motion. But the stepping tends to go in any direction and using as many steps as needed.
 

Don Roley

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Ever spar in slow motion? Try sparring at 25% speed, with the goal to be looking for openings. It's a great way to train the eyes, it's also a great way to develop patience and control.

I have done that. It also allows you to work with wooden weapons. It is my experience that you need a person standing on the side and stepping in when the pace gets taken up a bit unconsciously.
 

jus_dann

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i`ve got this cool little thing that i do: we start off with pushhands then move to entries(inside,outside,split),then hubud(have about 30 variations) also with leg strokes transitional knife drills. no big deal right? now the fun part. depending on who i`m working with, beginners never do more than 5 of any 1 drill, inter 3,advanced never do more than 1 of each before some kind of transition to another drill. this really keeps people on their toes, lol it also keeps from the students falling into a habit forming trance with any 1 drill, of course i work each and every drill with them 1st, but sometimes i slip a new one in on them just to see how they react...LOL never the less, alot of fun

dan
 

jus_dann

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keep in mind, this isnt really sparring but we add that in between the drills later. and only move as fast and as hard as the lesser can handle..
 

woot

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When people start talking about sparring, somebody always has to mention that sparring is not real fighting. I think most people already know this. It doesn't matter if sparring is real fighting or not. It has its place, it is effective for its purpose and sparring skills are better than no combative skills at all. I would hope that any martial art combines sparring practice with some amount of real world self defense as well.
 

joeygil

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I really like that slow mo sparring idea. Maybe I'll suggest it to my Sifu to try.

I like it when the instructor has us focus on one type of attack, by limiting our options. It makes you have to think a bit and use a bit more strategy, instead of simply wailing away. For example, sparring lead side only (either just punches or kicks or both). Or one side offense the other defense. Things of that nature.


One thing we do occasionally which is probably a good idea, but I still hate it, is 1 vs 2 (or 1 vs 3). It really teaches you a different sparring technique, both having to defend against multiple opponents (when you're the "victim"). You learn to use your opponents to block each other by positioning yourself in a line and other useful tactics. You even learn how to better coordinate yourself when your in the 2 or 3 team.

It's really exhausting, but worth it.
 

jks9199

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When people start talking about sparring, somebody always has to mention that sparring is not real fighting. I think most people already know this. It doesn't matter if sparring is real fighting or not. It has its place, it is effective for its purpose and sparring skills are better than no combative skills at all. I would hope that any martial art combines sparring practice with some amount of real world self defense as well.
To quote my instructor:
"Sparring is a method of practicing the learned techniques under pressure."

It's one tool in developing useful skills, if done properly. If done poorly and improperly, it's a great way to develop misplaced confidence or to falsely convince yourself that what you've learned isn't any good or is better than it really is.
 

woot

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To quote my instructor:
"Sparring is a method of practicing the learned techniques under pressure."

It's one tool in developing useful skills, if done properly. If done poorly and improperly, it's a great way to develop misplaced confidence or to falsely convince yourself that what you've learned isn't any good or is better than it really is.

I'm not trying to argue whether sparring is uselful or not, or even if it's real or not. It's just one of those things that someone always makes a comment about and makes me want to say something like,"well...Duh!"

I don't mean to sound overly negative about it. But some topics are like a broken record.
 
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