Questions about aikibudo, aiki jujitsu, and ninjutsu

Charbel Hanna

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Greetings! I'm looking to get back into martials arts. I am looking for something not competitive, but rather very oriented toward self defense and real-life scenarios. I want something generalist, such as jujitsu. As long as it is effective in real-life scenarios. My wife might also want to train with me, so that she may learn to defend herself against potential aggressors. We are both 25 years old.

With that in mind, perhaps you'll help me with my dilemma. There are three interesting dojos in Montreal (if anyone here from Montreal, feel free to recommend any dojo that I may have not noticed). I'll list the art taught by each of these three.

1- Aikibudo. I had no idea what it was until googling it. It seems interesting, but I have a few questions about it.
1.1 Does it teach atemi waza (striking techniques)?
1.2 Does it teach ne waza (ground grappling)?
1.3 From the videos, it looked very circular, like a choregraphy, but I'm not sure if this is just because it was a demonstration. Is it effective in real-life scenarios for beginners, or is it rather like aikido, where you would have to train a lot before it becomes (very) effective?
1.4 Is it closer to aikido, or jujitsu, in terms of techniques?

2- Aiki jujitsu. Note that it is not Daito ryu. This one seems very much generalist and oriented toward self-defense.
2.1 Does it teach atemi waza?
2.2 Is it closer to aikido or jujitsu?

3- Ninjutsu. Note that it is not Bujinkan, or at least I don't think it is, as this word appears nowhere on their website. This is the most mysterious to me. Clearly ninjutsu dojos today won't train us to become Ninja assassins (I'm not kidding myself).
3.1 How is it different from, say, jujitsu?
3.2 Does it rely a lot of weaponry, or not so much?

All in all, while keeping in mind that each dojo has its own peculiarities, which of these three martial arts would you recommend the most for real-life and effective self-defense scenarios? Is there anything I should know about any of these martial arts?

Thank you for your help!
 

Headhunter

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Best thing to do is get in contact with the instructor and ask him those questions
 

jobo

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Greetings! I'm looking to get back into martials arts. I am looking for something not competitive, but rather very oriented toward self defense and real-life scenarios. I want something generalist, such as jujitsu. As long as it is effective in real-life scenarios. My wife might also want to train with me, so that she may learn to defend herself against potential aggressors. We are both 25 years old.

With that in mind, perhaps you'll help me with my dilemma. There are three interesting dojos in Montreal (if anyone here from Montreal, feel free to recommend any dojo that I may have not noticed). I'll list the art taught by each of these three.

1- Aikibudo. I had no idea what it was until googling it. It seems interesting, but I have a few questions about it.
1.1 Does it teach atemi waza (striking techniques)?
1.2 Does it teach ne waza (ground grappling)?
1.3 From the videos, it looked very circular, like a choregraphy, but I'm not sure if this is just because it was a demonstration. Is it effective in real-life scenarios for beginners, or is it rather like aikido, where you would have to train a lot before it becomes (very) effective?
1.4 Is it closer to aikido, or jujitsu, in terms of techniques?

2- Aiki jujitsu. Note that it is not Daito ryu. This one seems very much generalist and oriented toward self-defense.
2.1 Does it teach atemi waza?
2.2 Is it closer to aikido or jujitsu?

3- Ninjutsu. Note that it is not Bujinkan, or at least I don't think it is, as this word appears nowhere on their website. This is the most mysterious to me. Clearly ninjutsu dojos today won't train us to become Ninja assassins (I'm not kidding myself).
3.1 How is it different from, say, jujitsu?
3.2 Does it rely a lot of weaponry, or not so much?

All in all, while keeping in mind that each dojo has its own peculiarities, which of these three martial arts would you recommend the most for real-life and effective self-defense scenarios? Is there anything I should know about any of these martial arts?

Thank you for your help!
To be honest i doubt any of them will be a great deal of help in real life, arnt there any proper dojo in your city?

If i had to choose from that selection id go for nijitsu, as then you attackers wont be able to get to you as you scoot a cross the roof tops
 

jobo

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What would you recommend, then? Something more in the line of MMA, BJJ or Muay Thai?
What is it you want to do, that question matters, arts that actually fight have an advantage over thosr that pretend to, that however means your going to get kicked and punched a lot, there afyer they scale down in usefullness.

I do karate, with some sprited but control sparing in it, thats good enough for me, other members will tell you that nothing less than mma will do

But rrally, go and see what they do, and if it looks good to you give it a try
 
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Charbel Hanna

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What is it you want to do, that question matters, arts that actually fight have an advantage over thosr that pretend to, that however means your going to get kicked and punched a lot, there afyer they scale down in usefullness.

I do karate, with some sprited but control sparing in it, thats good enough for me, other members will tell you that nothing less than mma will do

But rrally, go and see what they do, and if it looks good to you give it a try

In my last dojo, there were free time to actually fight. The art was non-competitive, but during that free time, people would put on a helmet and other protection and get at each other. I agree that simply practicing katas isn't very helpful in real life. So I guess I'll look for a dojo that at least offers this possibility. Or I'll take up Muay Thai haha!

Thank you for your answer!
 

Headhunter

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What would you recommend, then? Something more in the line of MMA, BJJ or Muay Thai?
As I’ve said already his recommendation means nothing....neither does mine or anyone’s it’s all about what you like. Whether these styles are effective or not it’s more about enjoyment you could train MMA or whatever they say is better but you may hate MMA so there’s no point training it if you dislike it no matter how effective it is. End of the day it’s a hobby, your giving up your time and your money to do it. You have to enjoy it
 
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Charbel Hanna

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There is also a Japanese Jujutsu that is very much like what you listed and not the same as BJJ

That's actually what I was looking for, but found nothing near me. If you know any dojo in Montreal (Ahuntsic), please let me know.
 

Steve

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Greetings! I'm looking to get back into martials arts. I am looking for something not competitive, but rather very oriented toward self defense and real-life scenarios.
If you're not looking for competition, but want something that will work for real life, your options are limited. You could become a soldier of fortune, join a gang, or volunteer for the paramilitary units in your local police department. Let's see... you could work as a bouncer or a personal bodyguard.

If none of those are your cup of tea, I think competitive styles are your best bet.

This is my opinion. There are many like it, but this one is mine.
 

Steve

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That's actually what I was looking for, but found nothing near me. If you know any dojo in Montreal (Ahuntsic), please let me know.
To be very clear, if you're just looking for something cool that you'll enjoy, any style that suits your fancy will work. If jujutsu appeals to you, by all means, have fun and enjoy yourself. A lot of great reasons to do it. Just don't confuse the sales pitch with the product.
 
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Charbel Hanna

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If you're not looking for competition, but want something that will work for real life, your options are limited. You could become a soldier of fortune, join a gang, or volunteer for the paramilitary units in your local police department. Let's see... you could work as a bouncer or a personal bodyguard.

If none of those are your cup of tea, I think competitive styles are your best bet.

This is my opinion. There are many like it, but this one is mine.

Thank you for sharing your opinion.
 
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Charbel Hanna

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No problem. And if you do decide to become a soldier of fortune or join a gang, let us know how it turns out for you. :)

Haha! Will do. But I don't think that'll happen. I'm probably too old for that, haha!
 

Kung Fu Wang

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I am looking for something not competitive, but rather very oriented toward self defense and real-life scenarios.
You are trying to take a class that has no homework, no middle term exam, and no final exam.

I had one class "Category Theory" like that. There were no homework, no middle term exam, and no final exam. During the last day of the class, the teacher said, "See you guys next semester". Everybody was shocked. One student asked, "How are you going to grade us?" The teacher said, "If you have courage to take this class, you deserve an A".

In my school, algebra is like 101. modern algebra is like 301. The category theory is like 969. You just can't find any other math course in the math department that has higher number than this class.

No home work, no exam -> I didn't learn anything from that class.

category-theory-1.png
 

drop bear

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What do you mean when you say non competitive but self defense orientation?
 
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Charbel Hanna

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What do you mean when you say non competitive but self defense orientation?

Simply that I don't want to compete. I don't want a sport with referee and rules. I do want to actually fight in the dojo, not just learn katas; but I don't want to learn the martial art as a sport with rules specific to sports, because in real life if someone attacks you, there are no rules.

Some people (on Reddit, especially) interpreted it as "I don't want to fight other people in the dojo", but that's not it. I simply don't want to actually compete in the literal sense, as in a championship.

I hope this helps clarify what I was trying to say. :)
 

Dirty Dog

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Simply that I don't want to compete. I don't want a sport with referee and rules.

Then you can never spar.

I do want to actually fight in the dojo,

These two statements are mutually incompatible. Fighting in the dojo is competition. And it WILL have rules and a referee.

Even if you're training in a place that loves to go to tournaments, YOU don't have to.
 
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