Proper tiltes for Arnis Black Belts

Darkmoon

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What are the proper titles for Modern Arnis? I've called Guro for the last year, and apparently that's not correct for Arnis. It's more correct for Kali, Which I'm not affiliated with.

Does anyone know what titles The Professor used or would use for Black Belts in each degree?
 

arnisador

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In Modern Arnis a black belt is a Lakan (male) or Dayan(g) (female). The usual instructor title is Guro (not Guru). This is how the Professor did it when I was around, and how I have always been addressed! Higher titles included Punong Guro, Master of Tapi-Tapi, and Datu, but those were used more rarely.
 

Guro Harold

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In Modern Arnis a black belt is a Lakan (male) or Dayan(g) (female). The usual instructor title is Guro (not Guru). This is how the Professor did it when I was around, and how I have always been addressed! Higher titles included Punong Guro, Master of Tapi-Tapi, and Datu, but those were used more rarely.
Yeah, the word was used so frequently, that once you heard learned the definition once, you didn't think about it.

There are other titles that are not associated as much in Modern Arnis like:
- Manong
- Maestro
- Tuhon
 

zen_warrior

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Modern Arnis uses a ranking system similar to the Dan ranks used in Karate or other Japanese systems. There are some minor variations between organizations as to the exact number of belts. There are 10 or 11 black belt ranks in Modern Arnis , depending on the organization. They are numbered in Filipino:

  1. Isa
  2. Dalawa
  3. Tatlo
  4. Apat
  5. Lima
  6. Anim
  7. Pito
  8. Walo
  9. Siyam
  10. Sampu
  11. Labing-isa (in some organizations)
Many groups use a "zero-degree" black belt rank as a probationary stage that comes before Isa. The actual name of the ranks is gender-specific. For men the rank is referred to as Lakan (Tagalog for male) while for women it is referred to as Dayang (Tagalog for "female").[citation needed] Thus, a first degree black belt in Modern Arnis would be referred to as either a Lakan Isa or a Dayang Isa, depending on his or her gender. The "zero-degree" rank, if used, is referred to as simply Lakan or Dayang. The black belt is traditionally bordered with red; however, some groups use a plain black belt.
In addition to rank, titles such as Datu, Commissioner, Master of Tapi-Tapi, Senior Master, Punong Guro, etc., have occasionally been granted to certain high-ranking individuals. The title Guro is typically given to all Lakans and Dayangs.

Guro
, the Filipino word for "teacher", a teacher of Filipino martial arts; derived from the Sanskrit word guru.
 

Guro Harold

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Modern Arnis uses a ranking system similar to the Dan ranks used in Karate or other Japanese systems. There are some minor variations between organizations as to the exact number of belts. There are 10 or 11 black belt ranks in Modern Arnis , depending on the organization. They are numbered in Filipino:

  1. Isa
  2. Dalawa
  3. Tatlo
  4. Apat
  5. Lima
  6. Anim
  7. Pito
  8. Walo
  9. Siyam
  10. Sampu
  11. Labing-isa (in some organizations)
Many groups use a "zero-degree" black belt rank as a probationary stage that comes before Isa. The actual name of the ranks is gender-specific. For men the rank is referred to as Lakan (Tagalog for male) while for women it is referred to as Dayang (Tagalog for "female").[citation needed] Thus, a first degree black belt in Modern Arnis would be referred to as either a Lakan Isa or a Dayang Isa, depending on his or her gender. The "zero-degree" rank, if used, is referred to as simply Lakan or Dayang. The black belt is traditionally bordered with red; however, some groups use a plain black belt.
In addition to rank, titles such as Datu, Commissioner, Master of Tapi-Tapi, Senior Master, Punong Guro, etc., have occasionally been granted to certain high-ranking individuals. The title Guro is typically given to all Lakans and Dayangs.

Guro, the Filipino word for "teacher", a teacher of Filipino martial arts; derived from the Sanskrit word guru.

Wow, nice use of Wikipedia!!!

There have been several MT members who have contributed much effort to write the reference material for MA. It's great to see some of it coming full circle back to MT!
 

Rich Parsons

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Yeah, the word was used so frequently, that once you heard learned the definition once, you didn't think about it.

There are other titles that are not associated as much in Modern Arnis like:
- Manong
- Maestro
- Tuhon

Harold,

I have heard Manong for those associated with Cebu and the use of Cebuano.

Maestro is from the Spanish influence.

Tuhon, I know is used with others with Visayan influence such as Negros Occidental and possible others.

Could you give me an example of people who were referred to by Manong? I am just curious.
 

Guro Harold

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Harold,

I have heard Manong for those associated with Cebu and the use of Cebuano.

Maestro is from the Spanish influence.

Tuhon, I know is used with others with Visayan influence such as Negros Occidental and possible others.

Could you give me an example of people who were referred to by Manong? I am just curious.
Hi Rich,

I was giving as example ranks of titles not typically associated with MA.

As far as an example of someone who was given the title of "Manong", again this is outside the context of MA, I can think of Guro Dawud Muhammad, who was given this title by Pamana Tuhon Chris Sayoc.

I have had the pleasure of meeting Manong Muhammad (also a black belt in MA) just after the Professor's passing.

According to the article, "Manong mean Revered Elder of the Sayoc tribe."

Best regards,

Harold
 

Brian R. VanCise

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Personally I like Guro and think it is not only appropriate but also not as pretentious as some of the other titles.
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arnisador

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I usually use "Mr." in a formal setting and "Jeff" in an informal setting. Modern Arnis was never an art formalized and ritualized--it was fun! I try to keep the Prof.'s upbeat spirit going when I can.
 

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I like the title Guro as well.

The Professor, it seemed, recognized other people's outside rank, ie, "Sifu Lee".

Also, if I am informed that an individual holds a Doctorate degree, then normally I would address them as such unless otherwise stated by them personally.
 

arnisador

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The Professor, it seemed, recognized other people's outside rank, ie, "Sifu Lee".

Yes, he was very respectful of others' titles. I try to do the same too, when I know them! There are more varieties of FMA titles than I can keep up with.

Also, if I am informed that an individual holds a Doctorate degree, then normally I would address them as such unless otherwise stated by them personally.
The Prof. would use Dr. when referring to me (and "Jeff" when speaking to me) because he knew I have a Ph.D. but to my mind that's unrelated to the martial arts (as opposed to his experience as a physical education prof., which was directly relevant). There are so many fraudulent "doctors" in the martial arts that almost fear to use the title!
 

Rich Parsons

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Hi Rich,

I was giving as example ranks of titles not typically associated with MA.

As far as an example of someone who was given the title of "Manong", again this is outside the context of MA, I can think of Guro Dawud Muhammad, who was given this title by Pamana Tuhon Chris Sayoc.

I have had the pleasure of meeting Manong Muhammad (also a black belt in MA) just after the Professor's passing.

According to the article, "Manong mean Revered Elder of the Sayoc tribe."

Best regards,

Harold



Harold,

Within the little bit of the Filipino Culture I have been exposed too, Manong does mean Revered Elder, usually someone within your family or you are paying respect too. I know it used with those of Cebuano language preference.

I was just curious.

Thanks
 
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Darkmoon

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Thanks for all of your in put. Mejishi The Center for the Physical Arts will benefit from it.

Thank you very much.
 

Brian Johns

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Personally I like Guro and think it is not only appropriate but also not as pretentious as some of the other titles.
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My feeling is along the lines of Brian and I agree that the term "guro" is not as pretentious as some of the other titles. Just my two cents.

Regards,
Brian Johns
 

Guro Harold

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Hmmm...

To some "Grandmaster", "Senior Master", "Datu", or "Master" could be considered pretentious.

So the question is what are some examples of titles that could be considered pretentious are why?
 

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In my mind, or what little is left of it, is that the only thing pretentious about rank of any supposed title is the arrogance of some so called "masters". Do they have the respect of thier peers that any well travelled instructor has? Who endorses this rank, What has he done that makes him stand out. If he can't answer any of these questions then who the heck is he and what gives him the right to any title! When he is teaching a class and some yahoo comes in and challenges him. How does he respond? Does he handle the problem and create a new student, does he run away?

Funny, this scenario has been known to happen. There are people out there that will come into a gym for a "lesson" just to test the instructor.
If you are a typical black belt who calls himself some lofty whatever, trust me, your time will come! Be honest with yourself and your students and you will get the respect you deserve, no more, no less.

Chris Arena
 

Rich Parsons

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In my mind, or what little is left of it, is that the only thing pretentious about rank of any supposed title is the arrogance of some so called "masters". Do they have the respect of thier peers that any well travelled instructor has? Who endorses this rank, What has he done that makes him stand out. If he can't answer any of these questions then who the heck is he and what gives him the right to any title! When he is teaching a class and some yahoo comes in and challenges him. How does he respond? Does he handle the problem and create a new student, does he run away?

Funny, this scenario has been known to happen. There are people out there that will come into a gym for a "lesson" just to test the instructor.
If you are a typical black belt who calls himself some lofty whatever, trust me, your time will come! Be honest with yourself and your students and you will get the respect you deserve, no more, no less.

Chris Arena

Chris,

How do you define a so called Master or would be easier to define a Master as you put it? I am curious.

Respect from their students?
Or respect from other local martial artists instructors and school owners?
Or respect from other martial artists in your system or organization?
Or respect from a larger community such as having article published?

Is there a minimum number of events or size of events that can also describe respect?

Or would it depend upon the situation?


What about those that insult other people and other systems and or are rude to those that come to train with them at a seminar or camp? Do these masters who have followers and may not have respect from others outside their immediate group be a master? Even if they have something to offer?


Endorsement of names or organizations is not always enough to verify or easy to verify.

So, what have they done to stand out? Is this a number of events a I mentioned above?

Or is it producing recognized other black belts?

Or is it that they have won "X" number of tournaments or events?


As to an open challenge, when this occurs you have automatically lost.

If you hurt the person then they file charges and you go to jail.

If you do not hurt them and just control them, many will take this as rubbing it in their face and you loose respect.

For the non open challenge such as it is not done to stop the class, but is done when you are working with them and they just ask questions and wonder. This is good to have questions. But if you do not have an immediate response to their question is it bad? If you take a few minutes to work it out and to look at the situation, is this good or bad?

I have had students train with me from other FMA's and after a while they ask me what about ...? I say go ahead and try. If they hit me they hit me. But, I also do not know what they are planning I just ask them to try what they want and then I react. Most stay and train. Some have left upset, as they thought I was embarrassing them by just placing my hand on or near their face or light contact to the body.

In an open challenge, I smiled and explained a lot of the above. I then asked them to wait until after class was over, and then we could lock the doors and everyone would be gone. Just to two of us. And then see what happens, for at that point it would be their word against mine. The single person who did this just stepped up on to the matts. I smiled, and told a student to call 911 and ask for an ambulance as one of was going to need it. They stepped back off the matts and left.

But I felt like I had lost.
 

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I like "Your Worship" but I can't get anyone to call me that...not even my own students. It sounds like a failed cause.

Sadly yours,
Dan Anderson
 
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Darkmoon

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Thank you very much for all of your very helpful information. My instructor (Sensi J. Spiro) appreciated it as well.

Thanks to you all, some confusion has been cleared up at Mejishi concerning Arnis titles.

Thank you again
 
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