Most effective martial art?

V

vin2k0

Guest
Hi, i was just wondering. I'd like to ask a question and would like replies without bias involved, do not simpley say judo is most effective because you study judo. Maybe people who do/have studied various arts could comment upon this subject.

But which Martial Art, if any, is most effective when you are out in the street? And which least effective? Are they all very close? Or does one prepare you for attack and prepare you for how to deal with the attack more than all of the others?

Comments are all appreciated... Thanks :asian:
 
I think this has been covered in depth a number of times. The is NO most effective art, what maters is how hard you train and what you come from training being able to do.




Despair Bear
 
Originally posted by Despairbear
I think this has been covered in depth a number of times. The is NO most effective art, what maters is how hard you train and what you come from training being able to do.




Despair Bear

Agreed.
Some arts are about training you to defend your life tomorrow (like Krav Maga), and some are about building you up to fight 20 guys in row (Karate). They all get you there in the end.

Although I suppose the few martial arts that focus on archery may not be too effective on the street.
 
The best statement I've read about which arts is the best was from a Chinese wrestling master. I will paraphrase; the most effective arts include punching, kicking, joint locks, and grappling. The master didn't differentiate between upright and ground grappling. Draw your own conclusions.

Mountain Sage
:asian:
 
Most effective: What I do
Least Effective: What everyone else does

;-)
 
Originally posted by vin2k0
Hi, i was just wondering. I'd like to ask a question and would like replies without bias involved, do not simpley say judo is most effective because you study judo. Maybe people who do/have studied various arts could comment upon this subject.

But which Martial Art, if any, is most effective when you are out in the street? And which least effective? Are they all very close? Or does one prepare you for attack and prepare you for how to deal with the attack more than all of the others?

Comments are all appreciated... Thanks :asian:

The most effective is what works for you when you need it.

There is no single art that is "most effective" or "best" (or any other subjective term) for everyone.

Silat may be the "most effective" art for me. But it may be the "least effective" for you.

Every person has unique attributes and, therefore, the terms "best", "worst", "most effective", "least effective" etc. will refer to different things for each individual.

Mike
 
The most effective is that in which you will consistantly train in....that in which will work best for you. It is your heart that determines victory over aggression, the discipline is merely the tool the body uses.

:asian:
 
Systema is the best martial art!!:2xbird:
(and im not just saying that becasue i take it, or am i?)

i dont think you'll ever realy be able to answer that question.
only two things can happen, people say "the best art is the one that works best for you" or a hundred people saying "no my art is the best" either way you aint getting an answer.

but seriously Systema is the best :D :asian:
 
For me Tae Kwon Do, I think it is the most effective for me because of my instructor. It is not typical TKD, we incorporate ground fighting, Hapkido, Hwa Wrang Do, Boxing and even some full contact training.

Although I have only had to "use" my training once, it was very effective.
 
Originally posted by pesilat
The most effective is what works for you when you need it.

There is no single art that is "most effective" or "best" (or any other subjective term) for everyone.

...


Every person has unique attributes and, therefore, the terms "best", "worst", "most effective", "least effective" etc. will refer to different things for each individual.

Mike

I agree totaly.

/Yari
 
Most effective would be a comprehensive training program integrating all the various aspects one might have to deal with in self defense. With special emphasis on awareness.

But when it comes right down to it, I think heart is what most carries the day and wins the fight. I know of a case where an off duty LAPD or LASO officer was shot through the heart and actually managed to win and survive the fight(though to be technical she did die/flat line a couple of times). She went back on full duty at something like six months after the incident. Heart is what kept her alive and helped her make it through the fight. It is your fighting spirit more so than the technique that one uses.

Least effective would probably be the often reccomend(by various media/ so called police) appeasement of predators.
 
Thanks for the comments guys. And to the guy that tried to slag me off for asking this question after training for 9 years, all i have to say is i was interested in different peoples opinions and perceptions. Why not post your reply on here if you are referring to this thread?
 
Originally posted by vin2k0
Thanks for the comments guys. And to the guy that tried to slag me off for asking this question after training for 9 years, all i have to say is i was interested in different peoples opinions and perceptions. Why not post your reply on here if you are referring to this thread?

Who tried to slag you off? I don't see any post in this thread that doesn't give an honest opinion to your question. Though there were a couple of flippant remarks made, they were "emoticonned" and left no question as to their intended good naturedness.

What did I miss?

Mike
 
In my opinion.... one should examine a few things about themselves....in other words...am I tall....are my legs long or short... are my arms long or short...am I heavy set or thinly built... do I have time to train, lots or little..... how flexable am I (which through exercises can be improved)... and how old am I (older students mid 30's & up don't usually move like the younger ones mid 30's and down, although they think they do sometimes).....these and a few other factors determine the most effective art "for you." The key to any art is to stick with it once you find one that is comfortable for you and you can make it work...the higher you go in your art, the higher the level of technique....art jumping is fun but some do not take the time to "really" learn the finer points of the art. All arts have these techniques at the higher levels... A 1st degree here, a 1st degree there, proves that you understand the basics of a few arts...not a thorough understanding of each..you probabley have not even touched the "most effective" part of these arts.
After having studied one art, for a few years (in the late 70's we did not have much choice)....I soon found that it was not for me and switched to Kenpo...it fit me genetically better (age, height, weight, etc...)
EG: I am not much of a kicker (shorter legs, not very tall, low flexability) so TKD, or TSD is out for me, although my kicks are powerful just not very high.

Everyday I learn how much I don't know about my art....therefore everyday is step closer to making it the "most effective" for me.

P.S. this is a general opinion...not pointed at anyone or art individualy
Good question....
BTW...are questioning your art?
 
Originally posted by vin2k0
Thanks for the comments guys. And to the guy that tried to slag me off for asking this question after training for 9 years, all i have to say is i was interested in different peoples opinions and perceptions. Why not post your reply on here if you are referring to this thread?

That would be me you are reffering to. I just assume that for someone who has practiced Karate for 9 years, he/she would know the only true answer to this question already. Have you heard of the expression that you can tell how much someone knows about a subject by the questions the person ask? ;)
 
The only honest answer I can come up with is whatever works for you, whatever you feel comfortable with I dont think there is one perfect style. :asian:
 
A quote I got from Dr. Maung Gyi of Bando: "No one nation or people has a monopoly on the sun; no one art or system has a monopoly on the truth."

Mike
 
Originally posted by pesilat
A quote I got from Dr. Maung Gyi of Bando: "No one nation or people has a monopoly on the sun; no one art or system has a monopoly on the truth."

Mike




Yeh!
thats what I meant!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Couldnt of said it better myself and if you read my previous post, I did'nt!


:duel:



:toilclaw:
 
The most effective martial applied to an aggressor to date has to be the atomic bomb. Of course, different scaled conflicts require different scaled methods.

You ask a seemingly simple question (kinda like asking "Is there a God") that has a multitude of correct answers.

Self defense as defined by law states that reasonable force is used to prevent an attack. If a guy says "Hey- I'm gonna kick your ***" and you call in a coalition airstrike and leave a forty foot crater where he stood, that may seem unreasonable (though to me, it seems desirable). Attacks vary in their severity. In Kenpo, we tend to take the line that our very lives are in danger and train to that outcome, with the logic being if we are prepared for the worst, anything less shall be handled effectively. In the end, it is all up to the individual. The grappling arts teach you to control your opponent, and crank up the heat as necessary. Most striking arts teach you to wail your opponent into submission.

It's whatever fits your world view. Just being capable in any art you pursue is likely enough to help you through most of life's situations. Only those in law enforcement and the armed services need be concerned with "kill or be killed" for the most part. Most of just need to deal with the occasional drunk moron, purse snatcher, or robber. Even those incidents are isolated.
 
Originally posted by Johnathan Napalm
That would be me you are reffering to. I just assume that for someone who has practiced Karate for 9 years, he/she would know the only true answer to this question already. Have you heard of the expression that you can tell how much someone knows about a subject by the questions the person ask? ;)

yes, and you are correct, i know very little on this subject. May well be considerable more than a new-comer, but everyone who studies karate still has a lot to learn. Including both of us.
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top