Left-Right

tshadowchaser

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Founding Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 29, 2001
Messages
13,460
Reaction score
733
Location
Athol, Ma. USA
I know that the forms are left and right sided but how many are required to practice their self defence on both sides?
When you test for the higher ranks are you (or do you require )self defence from both sides as part of the test?
 
Yes, we have to be proficient with every self-defense technique on both sides when you test for your 3rd brown and every belt thereafter. I really had a whole new look on the techniques after that. It really forced me to analize the principles contained in the techniques. Great learning experience.
 
Did you fond that if the tech. was used off a say right sided attack that sometomes the defence took on a whole different look and meaning. I know that some of my defences have a different meaning when left side is applied to right sided attact
 
You have to remember Kenpo is a right handed/strong-sided art with more than enough motion principles to take care of the weak side. Brains don't associate reaction time on the weak side but rather will move from the unconscious memory being the strong side during a stressful situation (I can account for that fact when I bent my steering wheel in half with my right arm during an automobile crash, to wit, I'm still suffering from an injured shoulder from it). That being said, there is no need to do the techniques on both sides (believe it or not, I used to think the same way about learning it on both sides) as there is plenty within the curriculum for all attacks, weak or strong sided.



Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
 
Well, if youre defending with the same exact technique for the same exact attack just with the opposite sides, then no. But as I'm sure you already know, you can use a lot of the same techniques for different attacks, then the technique will appear to take on a whole new meaning but I find that the principles usually stay the same. I hope I understood the question correctly and didn't just babble some useless garbage at ya.
 
There is a case for being proficient on both sides with all techniques. We used to do a drill where you were required to defend with only one arm. The other arm was put behind you in your belt. It was to simulate the loss that arm (broken, shot, etc.) If you never practiced using your weak side as your strong forward, you felt pretty uncoordinated.

Point is, don't take anything for granted.
 
Originally posted by tshadowchaser

I know that the forms are left and right sided but how many are required to practice their self defence on both sides?
When you test for the higher ranks are you (or do you require )self defence from both sides as part of the test?

I have trouble doing even the simple techniques the opposite way around to normal, it's just not something we usually practice. I think I know enough techniques to simply use another appropriate one, e.g. Buckling Branch instead of Thrusting Salute backwards, Sword of Destruction instead of Delayed Sword backwards etc..

Ian.
 
Originally posted by ProfessorKenpo

You have to remember Kenpo is a right handed/strong-sided art with more than enough motion principles to take care of the weak side. Brains don't associate reaction time on the weak side but rather will move from the unconscious memory being the strong side during a stressful situation (I can account for that fact when I bent my steering wheel in half with my right arm during an automobile crash, to wit, I'm still suffering from an injured shoulder from it). That being said, there is no need to do the techniques on both sides (believe it or not, I used to think the same way about learning it on both sides) as there is plenty within the curriculum for all attacks, weak or strong sided.



Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde

Wow! You sure aren't afraid to post your opinion away from "the
norm" are ya! Kudos for that! Anyways, I admit it was refreshing
to hear ya say that! I've had that opinion myself, although mine
isn't one from experience. I just felt that if Mr Parker wanted the
left side developed, he would've added it to the curriculum. The
first thing my instructor told me on my first day was "this is a
right handed system". It'll be interesting to see if my opinions
change the more experience I get.
 
Wouldn't it make more sense to have the attack come from the opposite side and then show how the defense has to be modified to deal with the different variables? That way instead of just seeing the surface application of the technique you start to delve deeper into what motions make the technique 'work'.

If I take a student and show them how a technique against a left punch can be tailored/changed/rearranged to defend against a right hand punch with the same basic motion then he can apply those concepts it to many attacks such as round house kicks, grabs, etc.

If I just teach him to do the technique mirrirored it only teaches him how to defend against the opposite hand not the multitude of other attacks it could be applied against.

Thanks,
Rob
 
In my school, we practice all the techs against various attacks.
Such as doing delayed sword against a roundhouse kick.
 
From what I've learned so far, Mr. Parker had built in what if's and left side attacks. The more I learn it the more I find myself saying "oh that's just so and so from the left" or something to that effect.


:asian:
 
Originally posted by Kirk

In my school, we practice all the techs against various attacks.
Such as doing delayed sword against a roundhouse kick.

As a sparring combo maybe, as a self defense technique, hmm...I think only people who'd been watching too many Jackie Chan films would be trying to kick up there in the street!

Ian.
 
Originally posted by Kirk



Wow! You sure aren't afraid to post your opinion away from "the
norm" are ya! Kudos for that! Anyways, I admit it was refreshing
to hear ya say that! I've had that opinion myself, although mine
isn't one from experience. I just felt that if Mr Parker wanted the
left side developed, he would've added it to the curriculum. The
first thing my instructor told me on my first day was "this is a
right handed system". It'll be interesting to see if my opinions
change the more experience I get.

Me bashful yea, like a turd in a party punchbowl. To me, there is no reason whatsoever to do techniques on the left side if you're already familiar with a motion to deal with an attack, that's the whole beauty of Kenpo, to respond with engrained motion to stimulus. I can't even imagine trying to do the ending to Wings of Silk or Destructive Twins on the left side WHEEEWWW! Is there a particular need for training both sides? I believe Zoran mentioned that you may be wounded or not have use of an appendage, irregardless, you will still respond from the primitive state in a crisis. If you've trained well enough to engrain the material, then you've evolved your primitive state to a trained response.


Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
 
Originally posted by satans.barber



As a sparring combo maybe, as a self defense technique, hmm...I think only people who'd been watching too many Jackie Chan films would be trying to kick up there in the street!

Ian.
Or an accomplished kicker that has been doing it a very long time.
 
Originally posted by ProfessorKenpo



Me bashful yea, like a turd in a party punchbowl. To me, there is no reason whatsoever to do techniques on the left side if you're already familiar with a motion to deal with an attack, that's the whole beauty of Kenpo, to respond with engrained motion to stimulus. I can't even imagine trying to do the ending to Wings of Silk or Destructive Twins on the left side WHEEEWWW! Is there a particular need for training both sides? I believe Zoran mentioned that you may be wounded or not have use of an appendage, irregardless, you will still respond from the primitive state in a crisis. If you've trained well enough to engrain the material, then you've evolved your primitive state to a trained response.


Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde
I am not taking issue with nor disagreeing with you. I was under the impression that the reason that a lot of instructors do that is to a.) make you almost ambidexterous and b.) to give you better understanding of the technique.
 
Originally posted by ProfessorKenpo

You have to remember Kenpo is a right handed/strong-sided art with more than enough motion principles to take care of the weak side. Brains don't associate reaction time on the weak side but rather will move from the unconscious memory being the strong side during a stressful situation (I can account for that fact when I bent my steering wheel in half with my right arm during an automobile crash, to wit, I'm still suffering from an injured shoulder from it). That being said, there is no need to do the techniques on both sides (believe it or not, I used to think the same way about learning it on both sides) as there is plenty within the curriculum for all attacks, weak or strong sided.



Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde

I totally agree with you Clyde. My instructor and I discussed this same issue one day and he said the same thing. :) :asian:
 
Originally posted by ProfessorKenpo

You have to remember Kenpo is a right handed/strong-sided art with more than enough motion principles to take care of the weak side. Brains don't associate reaction time on the weak side but rather will move from the unconscious memory being the strong side during a stressful situation (I can account for that fact when I bent my steering wheel in half with my right arm during an automobile crash, to wit, I'm still suffering from an injured shoulder from it). That being said, there is no need to do the techniques on both sides (believe it or not, I used to think the same way about learning it on both sides) as there is plenty within the curriculum for all attacks, weak or strong sided.



Have a great Kenpo day

Clyde


Hey Professor, welcome to Martial Talk, Clyde. You and I have had discussions in the Yahell clubs, it's good to see you here.
This will take a load off Mr. C, when it comes to answering some of the more indepth or obscure questions.

Again, welcome.
--Dave
:asian:
 
Originally posted by satans.barber



As a sparring combo maybe, as a self defense technique, hmm...I think only people who'd been watching too many Jackie Chan films would be trying to kick up there in the street!

Ian.

I meant block - kick - chop ... the block for the kick wouldn't be
an extended outward block, but the kick and chop would be the
same.
 
Originally posted by Kirk



I meant block - kick - chop ... the block for the kick wouldn't be
an extended outward block, but the kick and chop would be the
same.

Ah ok, I see what you mean, when I read it at first I thought you meant as a defense against a high roundhouse.

Makes sense now :)

Ian.
 
Originally posted by Kirk



I meant block - kick - chop ... the block for the kick wouldn't be
an extended outward block, but the kick and chop would be the
same.

What block would you use for a high round kick?



:asian:
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top