Lame wing tsun vs wing chun fight

Not sure why this is considered lame? You are looking at a fight in an open space and both systems are close area combat systems and are trained as such. If anything it just shows a limitation that everyone knows about the system.

Even if these guys were good in actually fighting, they would still have the challenge of closing the gap. The video should be used as a good case study to discuss ways on how to effectively close the gap.
 
It's lame cause you can clearly see no of them has ever done any serious sparring. And it shows.
 
And the point of posting this poorly shot video is?
Both of them are teachers with years in the field. Both are from different wing chun families and both of them are very bad fighters. I posted the video to show that rank and tittles are irrelevant in a fight.
 
Both of them are teachers with years in the field. Both are from different wing chun families and both of them are very bad fighters. I posted the video to show that rank and tittles are irrelevant in a fight.

Is this directed only at those two individuals?

Is this, as you say, only trying to make a point about titles? If it is that is far from clear by simply posting a video

Or is this a comment on Wing Chun in general?
 
It's not a comment on wing chun, I also train in wing chun. It's a comment in the philosophy and culture behind the system. Most schools focus on chi sao training or the forms, but not sparring. And the thing with sparring, it takes years of practice to become good, and your teacher to be experienced in sparring too. So he/she can actually give you useful advice. I have been in many schools and talked with people training in different lineages, most don't spar.
 
It's not a comment on wing chun, I also train in wing chun. It's a comment in the philosophy and culture behind the system. Most schools focus on chi sao training or the forms, but not sparring. And the thing with sparring, it takes years of practice to become good, and your teacher to be experienced in sparring too. So he/she can actually give you useful advice. I have been in many schools and talked with people training in different lineages, most don't spar.
Most people don't spar outside of their own system. For example, Wing Chun spars against Wing Chun. Karate spars against Karate. If you want to get good with sparring then, one person has to spar with everyday punches and kicks that an average person would use, or with punches and kicks from another system and then you can learn to use your system against that.

More specifically with Wing Chun the sparring should take place in both closed and open spaces. If a fighter has the opportunity to move and use the space then he or she will take that opportunity. As you saw in the video one guy literally ran after the other.
 
It's not a comment on wing chun, I also train in wing chun. It's a comment in the philosophy and culture behind the system. Most schools focus on chi sao training or the forms, but not sparring. And the thing with sparring, it takes years of practice to become good, and your teacher to be experienced in sparring too. So he/she can actually give you useful advice. I have been in many schools and talked with people training in different lineages, most don't spar.

Thank You
 
I am of the opinion that sparring holds less value than the mainstream tends to assign to it. And it really depends on the type of sparring because it is not all the same. It can certainly have value and one can learn from it, but there are a lot of variables in the mix, so sparring is not the end-all final word on martial skill and ability.

It is really really easy to go on YouTube and find examples of crappy martial arts. It is all over the place. And the reasons you might think it's crappy might be very different reasons why I think it's crappy. So perspective really carrys a lot of weight.
 
I am of the opinion that sparring holds less value than the mainstream tends to assign to it. And it really depends on the type of sparring because it is not all the same. It can certainly have value and one can learn from it, but there are a lot of variables in the mix, so sparring is not the end-all final word on martial skill and ability.

It is really really easy to go on YouTube and find examples of crappy martial arts. It is all over the place. And the reasons you might think it's crappy might be very different reasons why I think it's crappy. So perspective really carrys a lot of weight.

Agreed.

But I think sparing staying within ones style can be of great use. Meaning, using the style you train to spar with thereby learning how to apply it in a confrontation if necessary. And sparing others of other styles while sticking to your style helps one learn how to deal with outside of ones style.

However most of what people are referring to today as sparing is more along the lines of western boxing or Kick boxing and that does not lend itself well to learning how to apply the art you train to a confrontation. That teaches one how to apply boxing or kick boxing to a confrontation.

As for the YouTube Bits, they don't hold a whole lot of weight with me for the very reason you mentioned
 
The tall guy must be Phobius doing his "bridging" methods.
 
Certainly, neither guy in that video should be putting the title "Master" in front of their name! :eek:
 
Good to see kids out having fun.

I love how they just barged through everyone else. I have done that on the odd heavy session.
 
Lol the "groundfighting" bit was hilarious........


Why would you expect anything different? Contrary to the claims some 'chunners make, Wing Chun isn't about ground fighting, so you shouldn't expect to see sustained groundfighting. If you are going to have a WC fight, you need to:

a. Break within about 5-10 seconds of going to the ground.

b. Call it MMA and include grappling ...in addition to WC.

BTW this video is old stuff, apparently recently re-posted on youtube. For the life of me, I don't know why. Not exactly prime time material.
 
The tall guy must be Phobius doing his "bridging" methods.

I usually just ignore your posts, doing so I missed the fact that you keep thinking about me.

I am a tall guy, he is a tall guy. That was all resemblance. As for bridging, I don't even think I want to know how you considered that to be funny.

It is an old movie and I think it is one best left dead and unmentioned. But if people wonder if it was crappy fight. It is how most fights with large weight and height difference would look like. The small guy keep moving and maintaining distance. Often using legs. If he is smart. The tall guy becomes nothing more than a chaser and will eventually get frustrated and overstretch his reach.
 
I'm not sure why the fact that it is a wide-open space makes any difference, even though wing chun is close-range. That is what closing the distance is all about.
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top