Korean (LANGUAGE)

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Humble artist

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Does anybody of you study it?
I織m about to begin my self-studies.
I織ve searched the web,have found some minimal advice.
If I would get some information on the basics,structure and character of korean,I could start knowing what I織m gonna do.
I was thinking about ordering some books/tapes etc.
Any response would be great.
:asian:
 
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Pyrael

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the language in general or specifically in the techniques taught in korean MA?

if youre after the whole language it would be practical to learn from a person who knows it. if youre after the terms in say tkd, then reading a book about it should have all the terms
 
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Shinzu

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i have yet to come across a good site that teaches korean. your best bet is the advise pyrael has given. unless it is MA words you are looking for.
 

arnisador

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Is the Korean alphabet as difficult as the Japanese one? I imagine it must be nearly so as they're so similar.
 

Cthulhu

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Originally posted by arnisador

Is the Korean alphabet as difficult as the Japanese one? I imagine it must be nearly so as they're so similar.

Actually, I don't find them similar at all. I can always distinguish Korean from Japanese. To me, Korean looks more like old Chinese.

If it has lots of little ovals and circles, it's Korean :)

Cthulhu
 

arnisador

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I know what you mean Cthulhu! I meant similar in the sense that they are related (Chinese, Japanese, Korean).
 

Cthulhu

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Well, Japanese is a PITA because it has three written 'alphabets': kanji, hiragana, and katakana. I don't think Korean has that issue, but I'm not familiar enough with the language to know for sure.

Cthulhu
 

arnisador

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Originally posted by Cthulhu

Well, Japanese is a PITA because it has three written 'alphabets': kanji, hiragana, and katakana. I don't think Korean has that issue, but I'm not familiar enough with the language to know for sure.

I knew that about Japanese but it was part of what I was wondering about with respect to Korean.
 

Cthulhu

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Originally posted by arnisador



I knew that about Japanese but it was part of what I was wondering about with respect to Korean.

When I go to Asian markets, I don't notice any significant differences in writing on the Korean goods. However, that could just be due to my uneducated eye...for all I know, one package could have 12 different Korean lettering systems on there and I'd have no way of knowing.

Just go to a Korean market and ask :D

Cthulhu
 

Chris from CT

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I am pretty illiterate in Korean, but it is different than Chinese and Japanese because Korean is a Phonetic Language (is that the correct term?). Each Character represents a sound and are put together to make words much like the English alphabet. Where as Japanece and Chinese characters make up a idea by themselves.

Here is one of the sites that have helped me...

Introduction to Korean
http://www.langintro.com/kintro/

There are a couple more, but I can't seem to find them. Sorry. :(

Hope this helps. :)
Take care
 

KumaSan

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Here is an interesting (to me anyway) post about a possible link between Korea and written Japanese.

Originally posted by Chris from CT

...Korean is a Phonetic Language (is that the correct term

I think (and there's a good chance I'm wrong) this is called a 'syllabary'. And Japanese has this also. Two in fact, in addition to the ideagrams. That's what Cthulu was referring to about the 3 Japanese alphabets.

Someone (who may or may not be entirely full of it) once told me that in the Korean alphabet, the way characters are drawn contains clues to how the character is pronounced. Is this true? If so, could you elaborate? If not, let me know so I can let him know he's a jackass. Thanks!
 

Chris from CT

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Originally posted by KumaSan
Here is an interesting (to me anyway) post about a possible link between Korea and written Japanese.

That's pretty interesting. Also the title was kind of interesting too. "This should tick some japanese off." Because of the Japanese occupation of Korea, before and during WW2, the Koreans don't like the Japanese and vice versa. This may not be the case anymore, but it was a big to do with Hapkido's history.

Originally posted by KumaSan
Someone (who may or may not be entirely full of it) once told me that in the Korean alphabet, the way characters are drawn contains clues to how the character is pronounced. Is this true? If so, could you elaborate? If not, let me know so I can let him know he's a jackass. Thanks!

From what I am understanding he is correct. In Korean, each character is actually "a group of characters" that make up one syllable. Depending on the position of the character within the grouping will dictate what type of sound it will produce when spoken. For example a certain character in the first position will have a "s" sound while that same character in the end position will have a 't" sound.

This is also the case with the the word Hapkido when written in Korean. The first syllabe "Hap" has the charachter that makes a "p" sound when it's in its end position, but if it was in the middle position (the "a" in Hap) it would have a "b" sound.

Man, this is difficult without using any pictures! :D
I hope I didn't confuse you with my attempt to explain what little I know.

Take care. :)
 

Chris from CT

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If I didn't confuse you too much, I just made up a page off of our site that has examples. You know, for those of us who are "visual learners." guilty! :D

Korean Starter Page

Take care.



Mod Note : edited link on member request - Kaith
 

KumaSan

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Originally posted by Chris from CT

I hope I didn't confuse you with my attempt to explain what little I know.

Nope, you did a good job explaining. The pictures were just icing on the cake. Makes sense. Thanks for the lesson!
 

Kennesten

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Someone (who may or may not be entirely full of it) once told me that in the Korean alphabet, the way characters are drawn contains clues to how the character is pronounced. Is this true? If so, could you elaborate? If not, let me know so I can let him know he's a jackass. Thanks!

Hangul, the Korean writing system, was invented in the 15th century by King Sejong. Yup, it's phonetic, but the characters themselves ARE based on how the character is pronounced, as your friend says. The shaped of the character corresponding to the physiology of the act of enunciation, i.e. "|" can be the throat, and a "-" can represent the tongue. The sound "-|" is a guttural "uh" sound, located at the back of the mouth; the sound "|-" is an "ah" sound, and is projected towards the front of the mouth.

I don't know too much about Japanese language, but I think the Hiragana is also phonetic, except that characters represent consonant-vowel pairs (except for bare vowels and the ending sound). In this respect, Korean is more like English, in that every vowel and consonant has its own character.

Sorry for the dry pedantic tone =). I've been trying to brush up on my Korean too -- good luck!

Nicholas
 

KumaSan

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Hangul, the Korean writing system, was invented in the 15th century by King Sejong. Yup, it's I know too much about Japanese language, but I think the Hiragana is also phonetic, except that characters represent consonant-vowel pairs (except for bare vowels and the ending sound). In this respect, Korean is more like English, in that every vowel and consonant has its own character.

Sorry for the dry pedantic tone =). I've been trying to brush up on my Korean too -- good luck!


Okay, I admit I skipped a bunch of what was writtten above. If you want to know, read what was written. Japanese can be straightforward, for you overachievers. BLESS YOU!!
 
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MartialArtist

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Originally posted by Humble artist

Does anybody of you study it?
I織m about to begin my self-studies.
I織ve searched the web,have found some minimal advice.
If I would get some information on the basics,structure and character of korean,I could start knowing what I織m gonna do.
I was thinking about ordering some books/tapes etc.
Any response would be great.
:asian:
I grew up with it. I really have no first language, I grew up with both at the same time. Well, actually, my first language is English, I am much more fluent at it although my first word was in Korean, I don't think it really defines what a first language is, rather, fluency and understanding of the language are bigger factors.

And I haven't met a Westerner who can pronounce tae kwon do correctly. They pronounce it tai kwan doe which isn't really how it sounds like. More like tae (tape without the p) ko^n and a much sharper do.
 
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