Judo Landing tips?

Talisker

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Can I please ask is there any videos or guides that can help you get over this?

I have tried a Judo class and the landings really take it out of me. They never seem to phase anyone else in the class. But for me when I land I feel like I have been hit by a truck. This then brings anxiety over subsequent throws in the drill.

For example the O-Goshi you get lifted onto someone's back, and then you roll off to the side dropping and hitting the mat. It is about a 4ft drop at least in that instance. And it hurts a lot and knocks you for six.

I am hoping there maybe is a way to build up a tolerance to the landings? This is what I was hoping for if there is a good guide on building up a tolerance to receiving the throws.

We do the solo side, back and forward breakfalls at the start of the class in the warm-up. But they feel like nothing compared to receiving the actual throws themselves in the drills. Is it just a case of "that is Judo" or is there something you can do to build your body up so they don't phase you and don't hurt?

In my class I seen a 20 year old brown belt girl who was about 5.2" and she was being fully Judo thrown overhead rolled over slammed to the mat by 6ft sparring partners in the drills and it did not phase her one bit so I am thinking there must be a way to build up a tolerance to it.
 

Tony Dismukes

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It's just lots of practice. The ukemi drills at the beginning of class are part of that, but so is the experience of actually being thrown.

It's primarily about technique and not so much physical conditioning. Relax, exhale, spread the impact over as large a surface area as possible, and keep your chin tucked.

Relaxation is the hardest part for most people and also the most important. If you aren't used to taking a fall, you tend to tense up and that makes the fall hurt more.
 

Buka

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The harder you slap, the softer you land.

Keep it up, it gets easier over time.
 

isshinryuronin

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I took a few classes (1971) from a former All Japan Jiu-Jistu champion from the 1950's. He was old school to say the least and very strict. For the first couple of months all white belts did was practice falls on our own - no being thrown. (I got pretty good at falling, a skill that came in handy a few times later in life.) Perhaps your instructor is not spending enough time on the basics before pairing you off for throws.

I didn't stay long, being too young and impatient to get to the good stuff. But one of the highlights for me was being on the mat with a Russian Olympic judo gold medalist. He got me in an arm bar but was very gentle about it (I was gentle with him, too ). I believe his name was Igor. Never met an Igor before or since.
 

Holmejr

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Is the thrower holding on to you and not letting you fly? An experienced thrower, holding onto you can softens the impact a bit. Dont hold onto his sleeve, let him hold onto your sleeve. If you are stiff with anticipation you work against your break fall. Also, a slow motion throw often translates to a harder landing.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Try to

- not let your head to hit on the ground.
- land on your shoulder muscle behind your back.
- use your 2nd landing leg to smash on the ground.
- adjust the outer pressure and your internal pressure with your breathing.
- treat your body as a bouncing ball and bounce back up right way.
- enjoy being thrown as free body massage.

 
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wab25

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There are exercises and drills to do to get better at taking falls.
The ukemi drills at the beginning of class are part of that, but so is the experience of actually being thrown.
It also depends on which ukemi drills they do, which can vary a lot between schools. There are drills that start at the very beginning.... lay down, raise your feet, tuck your chin to your chest and slap... no impact at all... and you can do baby step drills all the way up to full throws. A lot of place will show a roll, then an intermediate fall... which everyone rushes through to get to the good stuff... and then they throw.

One of the things I like about Danzan Ryu Jujitsu is that they tend to spend a lot of time teaching you to roll and fall. This is the skill where DZR schools seem to be consistent.... all the schools seem to spend time on practicing their rolls and falls and most practitioners pride themselves in their ability to be thrown and take the fall.... more than being able to throw, submit or KO the other guy. (though, we like to do that as well...)

If you can find a DZR guy near you, maybe they can show you their rolling and falling drills.... they are kind of hard to type up.... and you will want someone with experience to walk you through them.....

But, there are falling drills to build up to the high falls, even though many schools skip most of the steps.
 
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Talisker

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But, there are falling drills to build up to the high falls, even though many schools skip most of the steps.

Are there any videos of them on Youtbe to watch?
 

wab25

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I have not found the ones we use yet.... Will post them if I do
 
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Talisker

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That doesn't instill me with confidence. It looks like he ended totally messed up.
 
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Talisker

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I am guessing it is like movie stuntmen who jump off second story buildings head first and walk away unphased. If an untrained person did that they'd break their neck.

So the trick is learning how to do that safely to build up to it. So are there videos on how to learn to do that safely?
 

marvin8

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I am guessing it is like movie stuntmen who jump off second story buildings head first and walk away unphased. If an untrained person did that they'd break their neck.

So the trick is learning how to do that safely to build up to it. So are there videos on how to learn to do that safely?
Ruustic
Jun 22, 2014

How to do a Parkour roll in the best, safest, most simple way! Rustic B shows his way to learn how to do a Parkour Shoulder (Judo) Roll roll in this detailed tutorial. MORE STUNT TUTORIALS: Best Kip Up Tutorial: Tricking, Breakdancing, Martial Arts - Rustic B

TIPS for Parkour / Judo Roll:
- Make sure you take your momentum forward instead of down! It will spread your impact and weight over the surface area of your entire body, and the energy will bounce off you like it does a ball.
- Use your hands to guide you into the proper position for the parkour roll! You can give yourself as much (or as little) cushioning as you want. And I'd definitely recommend trying to make your roll as safe as possible
:)

- Practice coming out of your roll and continuing your momentum forwards! This will help you when you do parkour, but also will teach you the proper weight distribution and direction when using this move to really save yourself from a bad drop.


Excerpts from "The Most Valuable BJJ Technique Every Person Should Know:"

"In all seriousness, the breakfall is the most important and applicable move in all aspects of life. Slip and fall in the kitchen? Hopefully you learned to breakfall. Is it an icy winter and while youre shoveling snow you slip? Breakfall. Walking a trail and trip? Tuck, roll and breakfall. This technique applies to other martial arts. If you are swept in muay thai and post on your glove, youre looking at a broken wrist or arm.

One out of five falls causes a serious injury such as broken bones (wrist, arms, and hips) and head injury.

These injuries can all be avoided by proper technique, the breakfall. If executed correctly, you can avoid broken wrists and arms by not posting which is the natural human reaction. Tucking the head can greatly reduce the chance of head injury and falling on your body in the right way can also reduce hip injury...."



 

Kung Fu Wang

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That doesn't instill me with confidence. It looks like he ended totally messed up.
The reason that you throw your opponent is to hurt him when he lands on the ground.

When A throws B,

1. A wants to hurt B.
2. B doesn't want to get hurt by A.

1 and 2 can't exist at the same time. Some throws just cannot be saved by "break fall".



head_into_ground.jpg
 

Buka

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I am guessing it is like movie stuntmen who jump off second story buildings head first and walk away unphased. If an untrained person did that they'd break their neck.

So the trick is learning how to do that safely to build up to it. So are there videos on how to learn to do that safely?
As a former stuntman I can tell you it doesnt exactly work that way.
 
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