Starting again

Drumslam

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I started training Muay Thai back in the late 90s but had to stop because of having wrist issues. Over the years, I’ve tried to get back into different martial arts and have also dealt with various physical issues which have caused me to have to back off again. A number of times I’ve tried to basically swear off doing martial arts, but I always come back to wanting to do it.

I’m 47 years old and I have tendinitis in both of my wrists and a bad low back. I’m a full-time professional drummer so I have to be careful not to get injured to where I can’t play the drums and perform. But the desire to want to become proficient in self-defense, and also the desire to be engaged in an activity where I am learning something practical as well as being physical, is something that really just won’t go away.

Honestly, if I’m going to do martial arts, I want to find a way to do a style that is going to be effective for actual real world self-defense in case I ever need it for myself or from my family. I do often find myself in situations because of my profession where things have the potential of getting kind of Squirrley. So knowing how to defend myself could be a really helpful skill to have (loading out of clubs at midnight on a weekend in a back alley is a good example).

Ultimately, I need to find a style that I can stick with for the rest of my life that is practical for self-defense and that will keep me active as I get older that I can continue to do without having to worry about destroying my wrists or my back to where I can’t make a living playing the drums. I know that everything has a risk, so I’m not saying I’m looking for something that’s 100% where there’s no chance whatsoever that I won’t get any kind of injury. What I am saying though is that I want a style where the potential for injury is not so high that it’s always constantly on my mind, and also to where I don’t feel like I got rolled in a back alley after every class (I don’t mind if I am sore a bit. I just don’t want to feel like I got jumped by a gang of thugs after every class).

So with all that in mind, what would you all suggest I look for style wise?
 

Bujingodai

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Well every style and system will have a different focus that might possibly harm a certain part. Even within schools different dojo will have focus on something.
I'd say a traditional style might be less potential for damage than a sport combative. Where are you located?
 

MuayJitsu

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Injuries are a part of martial arts that’s just how it goes as for the wrists well I mean every martial art you need your wrists, striking you need to punch, grappling you need to grab, just choose a style choose a club go down there see if you like it. If you do keep going if you don’t repeat the first steps.
 
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Drumslam

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Realistically, if I could find a way to train boxing or Muay Thai that would be my preference. I would just have to find a way to do it that won’t mess up my wrists.
 

Martial D

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I started training Muay Thai back in the late 90s but had to stop because of having wrist issues. Over the years, I’ve tried to get back into different martial arts and have also dealt with various physical issues which have caused me to have to back off again. A number of times I’ve tried to basically swear off doing martial arts, but I always come back to wanting to do it.

I’m 47 years old and I have tendinitis in both of my wrists and a bad low back. I’m a full-time professional drummer so I have to be careful not to get injured to where I can’t play the drums and perform. But the desire to want to become proficient in self-defense, and also the desire to be engaged in an activity where I am learning something practical as well as being physical, is something that really just won’t go away.

Honestly, if I’m going to do martial arts, I want to find a way to do a style that is going to be effective for actual real world self-defense in case I ever need it for myself or from my family. I do often find myself in situations because of my profession where things have the potential of getting kind of Squirrley. So knowing how to defend myself could be a really helpful skill to have (loading out of clubs at midnight on a weekend in a back alley is a good example).

Ultimately, I need to find a style that I can stick with for the rest of my life that is practical for self-defense and that will keep me active as I get older that I can continue to do without having to worry about destroying my wrists or my back to where I can’t make a living playing the drums. I know that everything has a risk, so I’m not saying I’m looking for something that’s 100% where there’s no chance whatsoever that I won’t get any kind of injury. What I am saying though is that I want a style where the potential for injury is not so high that it’s always constantly on my mind, and also to where I don’t feel like I got rolled in a back alley after every class (I don’t mind if I am sore a bit. I just don’t want to feel like I got jumped by a gang of thugs after every class).

So with all that in mind, what would you all suggest I look for style wise?
You are pretty much describing the perfect setup for learning bjj. All boxes ticked.
 

Holmejr

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Every physical activity has the potential for injury. I come home from tennis aching, just like I come home from MA training. So, just go for it and be smart about it. Start measured, figure out your boundaries and build up to your potential.

Get good sleep and stay well hydrated.
 

MuayJitsu

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Realistically, if I could find a way to train boxing or Muay Thai that would be my preference. I would just have to find a way to do it that won’t mess up my wrists.
You definitely can. You can spend more time shadow boxing so less impact on the wrists. Sure that’s not perfect but you can still do it and you can do whatever you want kick knee and elbow wise and clinch. You can always wrap your hands wear some bigger gloves and if you are doing boxing pads just limit the power you’re hitting with focus on technique. There’s always a way around things
 
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Drumslam

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You definitely can. You can spend more time shadow boxing so less impact on the wrists. Sure that’s not perfect but you can still do it and you can do whatever you want kick knee and elbow wise and clinch. You can always wrap your hands wear some bigger gloves and if you are doing boxing pads just limit the power you’re hitting with focus on technique. There’s always a way around things
That sounds great!
 

Martial D

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Not really since he doesn’t want to damage his wrists or his back.
I'm not sure what kind of bjj you have done that damages your wrist or back, but it's definitely less than hitting things with your fists or the quick movement needed for kicking or throwing. Ground fighting is more of a slow attrition most of the time.
 
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