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tshadowchaser

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How much of the language is required for you to know in you study of your art.
How about a list of some of them
Is Japanese only spoken or is your native language also spoken in class
 

MJS

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How much of the language is required for you to know in you study of your art.
How about a list of some of them
Is Japanese only spoken or is your native language also spoken in class

Counting is done in Japanese. All of the stances, blocks, punches, kick, etc., are all said in Japanese. Fortunately, no, Japanese is not the only language spoken in the class. :)

Since this art was new to me, I took the time to research the terms used in the class, as well as asked my teacher and other students. I figure if I'm training, I better know the correct way to say the words. :)
 

hoshin1600

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the Okinawans have often said if you dont know the language you can never fully understand the art. there are terms and words that have no translation. the same can be true for Japanese. and if your wondering Okinawa once had its own distinct language but its mostly been lost now except maybe some old fishermen and karate guys. i have found that having an understanding of the language can help my understanding of the art but also knowing the cultural environment that your art was native to is also important. however if your dojo and instructor do not use the original language there really isnt any use in learning it.
 

donald1

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In my karate class we use the Japanese language, I know somewhat of the language but not enough to carry on conversation outside of the dojo...
(this is important, I would be tempted to look more into this and ask my instructor more about it)
 

Chris Parker

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How much of the language is required for you to know in you study of your art.

That depends on the art itself, obviously, however a common terminology is important, and, especially in the case of distinct systems, the very specific terminology can have quite a fair amount of importance, to the point where using it is essential for actually understanding the art itself. But, to put it better, here: The Budo Bum: On Language and Budo

How about a list of some of them

Again, depends on the art… Kenjutsu and Iai: TIJ: glossary of Japanese sword

Ninjutsu and related: Glossary of Dojo Terms | Bujinkan Jishin DojoBujinkan Jishin Dojo

It should be noted, of course, that these lists are not exhaustive, and many terms might be substituted or completely omitted depending on the Ryu-ha itself… for example, there are systems that don't use the term "kata" to refer to their methods, instead using kajo (chapter), seiho (powerful methods), or hoke (family method/transmission method)… or the same strike/fist might be called a Shuto Ken in one system, and a Kiten Ken in another… or the same terminology (Ichimonji) could refer to a range of different things, such as a technique, a posture (not necessarily the same posture as found in other systems with the same term being used), a movement, or anything else.

Is Japanese only spoken or is your native language also spoken in class

Japanese only? Only in Japan.

That said, I've been bringing more and more Japanese into the classes I run (traditionally, we've dominantly used English, with my personal instructor not paying much attention to the Japanese terms)… in part due to the prevalence of online discussion, so that my students aren't lost when they see a term on the net, or should they travel to train anywhere else.
 

hoshin1600

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Hey Chris..
a shuto ken? that would seem to be a contradiction in a way doesnt it? or maybe a bit of a redundency depending on the kanji. :) i seem to remember a strike where your using the edge of the hand but the hand is open with the fingers at a 90 degree angle to the palm is this anything like the shuto ken you mention?
 

donald1

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One thing I'm not sure of is what's the difference between domo arigato gozaimashita and domo arigato gozaimasu
 

hoshin1600

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i belive its a past / present issue. Gozaimashita would be a thank you for something that was done some time ago. (thank you for sending me that birthday card) Gozaimasu is present ( hand me the salt,, thank you)
 

hoshin1600

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but then as i think about it you wouldnt be so formal if someone handed you the salt.
 

Chris Parker

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Hey Chris..
a shuto ken? that would seem to be a contradiction in a way doesnt it? or maybe a bit of a redundency depending on the kanji. :) i seem to remember a strike where your using the edge of the hand but the hand is open with the fingers at a 90 degree angle to the palm is this anything like the shuto ken you mention?

手刀拳. The last character (拳- ken/kobushi) refers to "weapon" or "fist", the first two are "hand edge/sword"… within these arts, "ken" is the standard suffix, with the first section describing which form of weapon it is. For example, a knee strike is a Sokki Ken, a head butt is a Kikaku Ken, and so forth. We don't use it to specifically mean "hand", so it's not a redundant terminology here. But yeah, that's what I'm describing.

One thing I'm not sure of is what's the difference between domo arigato gozaimashita and domo arigato gozaimasu

i belive its a past / present issue. Gozaimashita would be a thank you for something that was done some time ago. (thank you for sending me that birthday card) Gozaimasu is present ( hand me the salt,, thank you)

Yep, present tense versus past tense. In training protocols, "gozaimashita" is commonly used as you're thanking your partner (or your teacher) for the training experience they've just given you.

but then as i think about it you wouldnt be so formal if someone handed you the salt.

Ha, depends on who was passing it…
 
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