Is Akido worth learning? (Self Defense)

O'Malley

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It's specifically designed to immobilise, but not hurt. I have disdain for this because out of all the confrontations I have had, my opponents never went easy on me, and the idea that I should is something I disagree with.

That's actually a myth. Immobilisations are a relatively small part of the curriculum, and an even smaller part of the overall skills trained in aikido. Furthermore, the techniques themselves are not comparatively safer to an attacker. Actually, competitive arts (e.g. wrestling) are much better at neutralising an opponent without hurting him.

This is because it trains through repetition, and though I am a traditionalist, it's simply a method of training that won't allow you to use Aikido for self-defense until you have dedicated yourself to it for a long time.

I don't really understand what you mean by "repetition" but most aikido training is through solo training and kata. However, there are many approaches and emphases to kata training: Pattern Drills: A Requisite Training Methodology Towards Combative Effectiveness 斤暹郎

In contrast, modern arts such as Boxing and Sambo, even though they're not necessarily made for self-defense, teach you things from your very first lesson that you can apply almost as soon you walk out of the lesson. Aikido has thousands of techniques - Boxing has 4 punches (with some slight variations) and 5 defenses at most. It also encourages sparring, and unless your school of aikido does too, you're already at a disadvantage compared to the average boxing gym.

Mostly agree with this. Just a note on the "thousands of techniques" bit as it is imprecise. Modern aikido has actually very few techniques (about a dozen) performed from about twenty positions. The curriculum is very limited. I guess that you are referring to "Takemusu Aiki" (birth of martial), the idea that application of aikido principles can be expressed through an infinite number of forms, which is quite different.
 

Ivan

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That's actually a myth. Immobilisations are a relatively small part of the curriculum, and an even smaller part of the overall skills trained in aikido. Furthermore, the techniques themselves are not comparatively safer to an attacker. Actually, competitive arts (e.g. wrestling) are much better at neutralising an opponent without hurting him.



I don't really understand what you mean by "repetition" but most aikido training is through solo training and kata. However, there are many approaches and emphases to kata training: Pattern Drills: A Requisite Training Methodology Towards Combative Effectiveness 斤暹郎



Mostly agree with this. Just a note on the "thousands of techniques" bit as it is imprecise. Modern aikido has actually very few techniques (about a dozen) performed from about twenty positions. The curriculum is very limited. I guess that you are referring to "Takemusu Aiki" (birth of martial), the idea that application of aikido principles can be expressed through an infinite number of forms, which is quite different.
My father's friend described how all of his training was dedicated to locks and techniques that stopped an opponent from moving. As for the repetition, that's exactly what I refer to; lots of training to apply techniques and to perfect them, very little actual application. Many TMAs have a trend where partners show little resistance when techniques are applied, and Aikido doesn't have the commodity of sparring.
 

Flying Crane

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My father's friend described how all of his training was dedicated to locks and techniques that stopped an opponent from moving. As for the repetition, that's exactly what I refer to; lots of training to apply techniques and to perfect them, very little actual application. Many TMAs have a trend where partners show little resistance when techniques are applied, and Aikido doesn't have the commodity of sparring.
Repetition is key in any martial training. You wont get good at any of this if you do it ten times and then decide your training is complete and finished. Every time you train, you are doing repetition. I dont see how you can claim otherwise. What I bolded above, you are describing application, which is what you are saying isnt done, in the same sentence. Would you care to clarify?

If you are really talking about resistance training, that is a different matter. But when you stop repetition, you have stopped training.
 

Ivan

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Repetition is key in any martial training. You wont get good at any of this if you do it ten times and then decide your training is complete and finished. Every time you train, you are doing repetition. I dont see how you can claim otherwise. What I bolded above, you are describing application, which is what you are saying isnt done, in the same sentence. Would you care to clarify?

If you are really talking about resistance training, that is a different matter. But when you stop repetition, you have stopped training.
I disagree.
Repetition is always training.
Training is not always repetition.

I could practice a sidekick 10,000 times a day, but the correct technique is worthless if I don't learn to apply it under pressure, or apply it in general. From my experience, TMAs don't teach you to apply techniques under pressure, at least not until a much later level compared to combat sports.
 

Gerry Seymour

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You described the main problem with Aikido, in my opinion, right there. It's specifically designed to immobilise, but not hurt. I have disdain for this because out of all the confrontations I have had, my opponents never went easy on me, and the idea that I should is something I disagree with.

There is a very good book about Aikido called Angry White Pyjamas, a real page-turner. My father also has a friend who has been doing Aikido for a while and claimed he watched him defend himself from a drunk quite skillfully. But if I am honest, you are putting yourself at a disadvantage nowadays if you choose to train in martial arts such as Aikido. This is because it trains through repetition, and though I am a traditionalist, it's simply a method of training that won't allow you to use Aikido for self-defense until you have dedicated yourself to it for a long time.

In contrast, modern arts such as Boxing and Sambo, even though they're not necessarily made for self-defense, teach you things from your very first lesson that you can apply almost as soon you walk out of the lesson. Aikido has thousands of techniques - Boxing has 4 punches (with some slight variations) and 5 defenses at most. It also encourages sparring, and unless your school of aikido does too, you're already at a disadvantage compared to the average boxing gym.
A簿kido contains plenty of techniques that can injure. Early on, injuries were actually common in the dojo. What you see now is largely the result of a later, more philosophical approach.
 

Gerry Seymour

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My father's friend described how all of his training was dedicated to locks and techniques that stopped an opponent from moving. As for the repetition, that's exactly what I refer to; lots of training to apply techniques and to perfect them, very little actual application. Many TMAs have a trend where partners show little resistance when techniques are applied, and Aikido doesn't have the commodity of sparring.
Aikido can have sparring. Theres really no reason it cant be there.

As for the immobilizations, many schools practice always finishing with one. But the techniques used to get there are often destructive (uke uses breakfalls to avoid injury).
 

MartialMasterTeddy

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If your looking for esoteric Inner Powers then a System of Mental Constraint and Restraints such as Ashtanga Yoga is better for you. Plus it can be done 100% alone without a partner.
But for MPA, if you only just stand in front of a mirror doing movements it doesn't make any sense. It is an extremely, extremely social Field and Field of Activity.
 

ranWDY

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Hello,

The topic is very interesting, I'm learning a lot, thank you!

I'd like to start aikido in a few months and I can't find any good information on physical preparation and the equipment you need to start.
Should I buy the equipment right away? Or should I wait a few sessions?

To train at home, once I've bought the equipment, will buying a wooden katana like this one {link deletedy - jks9199} help?
 
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O'Malley

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Hello,

The topic is very interesting, I'm learning a lot, thank you!

I'd like to start aikido in a few months and I can't find any good information on physical preparation and the equipment you need to start.
Should I buy the equipment right away? Or should I wait a few sessions?

To train at home, once I've bought the equipment, will buying a wooden katana like this one Samurai Sword | Hand-Forged | KatanaEmpire.us help?

Hi and welcome to MT. Aikido is relatively accessible in terms of physical fitness, so I'd just advise you to find a dojo, try out a few classes and take it from there (your instructor will let you know what equipment you need and may actually get you a discount in local shops). No need to wait for a few months :)
 

mograph

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A wise man told me, "there can be no refinement without repetition."

This does assume that one is attempting to refine and encode that refinement into memory for future recall under pressure. Also, to use that encoded memory in future improvisations, which is an excellent test to see if the memory has been internalized.

... not repetition for its own sake, in other words.
 

Xue Sheng

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Hello,

The topic is very interesting, I'm learning a lot, thank you!

I'd like to start aikido in a few months and I can't find any good information on physical preparation and the equipment you need to start.
Should I buy the equipment right away? Or should I wait a few sessions?

To train at home, once I've bought the equipment, will buying a wooden katana like this one Samurai Sword | Hand-Forged | KatanaEmpire.us help?
I would buy nothing unless told. The dojo will tell you all you need to know, and all you need to buy. It is also very likely do not expect you to be especially prepared for any of it. That too they will help you with.
 

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