In defense of oil and gas companies, they aren't the bad guys

granfire

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considering that a gas company caused a lot of trouble by assume a calculated risk by saving 200k dollars (out of the billions in record profits) I find it really hard to not consider them to be 'the bad guys'

The continued rumor is that big corporations are eager to buy up promising patents that could advance mankind, to be thrown into vaults never to be seen again.

I heard of poly urethane tires that would virtually never need replacing and no air to inflate.

There are options to advance independency from fossil fuels by means of more fuel efficient applications or recycling. But the consciousness in the US is just not there.
There is no interest to promote these things. and since everything does ride on the almighty dollar, I am having a good guess as to why.
 

Big Don

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I heard of poly urethane tires that would virtually never need replacing and no air to inflate.
I, for one, blame Big Air...
There are options to advance independency from fossil fuels by means of more fuel efficient applications or recycling.
Such as? How about the early 90's Geo Metro, a little runt of a car that got 53MPG, but, didn't sell because they were butt ugly, shouldn't the government have forced GM to keep making them? Especially when the government controlled GM?
But the consciousness in the US is just not there.
There is no interest to promote these things. and since everything does ride on the almighty dollar, I am having a good guess as to why.
Because, there is no BIG money in it. Whoever makes the big, technological breakthrough that makes cars run on water (Man) or whatever the next big fuel turns out to be, will be rich beyond the dreams of avarice.
 

Steve

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So, we should subsidize you, not the large companies...
Whether you do or not, I'd likely buy the car. Like the oil companies, I'd be foolish not to take it when offered. Unlike the oil companies, I don't consider it an entitlement and a way to pad record profits.
 
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Steve

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I, for one, blame Big Air... Such as? How about the early 90's Geo Metro, a little runt of a car that got 53MPG, but, didn't sell because they were butt ugly, shouldn't the government have forced GM to keep making them? Especially when the government controlled GM?Because, there is no BIG money in it. Whoever makes the big, technological breakthrough that makes cars run on water (Man) or whatever the next big fuel turns out to be, will be rich beyond the dreams of avarice.
Friend of mine still drives a Metro. There are websites that are devoted to increasing gas mileage. They did sell and they're still all over the place if you look for them.

And I guarantee that as gas prices rise, we'll see more and more of them (and other similar cars like the VW and Audi TDIs) on the roads. We will also see more bikes and really notice an uptick with mopeds. I see any of these as being good ways to go if it suits your particular situation.

I want to be very, very clear that I have several reasons for being interested in EV technology.

Number one is pushing ever closer to energy independence. As I said before, this is a priority.

Number two is easily financial. I'm looking at cutting my daily operating costs for transportation to 1/3rd of what I pay now.

Number three is, frankly, a desire to do something new and different. The idea of driving a car that makes little noise and runs on electricity is just neat, IMO.

Number four... a distant fourth, are concerns about the environment. I, like most American I believe, am willing to do things that are "green" if it's not too much of a burden. I mean, I'm good about recycling because an infrastructure is in place that makes it easy for me to do the right thing.
 

granfire

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I, for one, blame Big Air...
quit being silly.
But it seems like Goodyear and Micheline would have little interest in letting a competitor reach the market that runs forever and does not need replacing after running over a nail.

Such as? How about the early 90's Geo Metro, a little runt of a car that got 53MPG, but, didn't sell because they were butt ugly, shouldn't the government have forced GM to keep making them? Especially when the government controlled GM?
Like I said, the consciousness is not there. I don't blame people in rural areas for wanting (or needing) a big vehicle, but if you live in an urban setting a big car is ridiculous to own.

Because, there is no BIG money in it. Whoever makes the big, technological breakthrough that makes cars run on water (Man) or whatever the next big fuel turns out to be, will be rich beyond the dreams of avarice.

You are very wrong that there is no money in it.
But it won't be easy flowing money.
Environmental cleanup techniques are big business, a growing industry, so are recycling companies.
Any and all plastic you can recycle frees up crude oil to be used in other application - gas is by now probably only a small side business of the petrol biz. Another reason why people should be mad about being jerked around.
Cars can be made - without going hybrid - to use very little fuel. I don't think there is a reason that any vehicle still uses as much gas as they do - in the states. As Sukerkin has pointed out, in other parts of the world they laugh at us when we yammer on about paying 4 bucks a gallon. Though most of the gas prises in Europe are taxes, straight up.

And still, there is the gas price roulette: the markups fluctuate without rhyme or reason around the country...except when there is a peak of usage to expect, the price jumps up. Usually being blamed on the Chinese...

Also, there are alternative fuels already available...and most are not really new: In WWII many people converted their vehicles to burn wood.
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holzvergaserkessel

There is no interest in advancing alternatives. Business as usual is good money. Especially when you do have the monopoly or share it with your 4 or 5 closest friends.

Or the regulations are set up that new technologies can't be pursued or put into a working application.

I think of it that way: If California would have not enforced a strict emissions rule on new cars, we still would drive on leaded fuel with no catalytic converters. And golly, do you remember the cries of horror from the auto industry?!

business does not adjust itself to the demand of a powerless few. But will make miraculous strides when the thumb screws are put to them.
( there are also curious things going on about a certain type of 0 emission care being available - but only in very restricted marked under threat of draconian punishments for dealers breaking those restriction....hmmmmm I suppose only Cali people deserve cleaner air...the rest can choke??)

The man who invents the new fuel will likely stay poor. because he won't have the backup of industry to implement his invention in a meaningful way. He will graciously accept the buyout from big biz and retire to his row house in Podunk someplace...
 

Steve

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There is no interest in advancing alternatives. Business as usual is good money. Especially when you do have the monopoly or share it with your 4 or 5 closest friends.
Until we demand it. And that means buying the less convenient, flawed, early forays into the market and, literally, putting our money where our mouths are. I'm very anxious about bugs and unforeseen issues with what is essentially a first generation EV. While there have been others in the past, the Leaf and the Fusion EV are the first real consumer grade, to the masses EVs on the market. I'm not rich enough to buy a Tesla Roadster, nor am I smart, nerdy or radical enough to convert an ICE to an EV. But, I make a good wage, and can logistically swing this thing. It's within the scope of what I can do, and it is my small part of saying to the auto industry, "There IS a demand for alternatives."

What is also working in our favor is that the auto industry got left hanging by big oil. Historically, the two have worked in tandem, but while the auto industry crumbled around us big oil is raking it in.
 

granfire

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Until we demand it. And that means buying the less convenient, flawed, early forays into the market and, literally, putting our money where our mouths are. I'm very anxious about bugs and unforeseen issues with what is essentially a first generation EV. While there have been others in the past, the Leaf and the Fusion EV are the first real consumer grade, to the masses EVs on the market. I'm not rich enough to buy a Tesla Roadster, nor am I smart, nerdy or radical enough to convert an ICE to an EV. But, I make a good wage, and can logistically swing this thing. It's within the scope of what I can do, and it is my small part of saying to the auto industry, "There IS a demand for alternatives."

What is also working in our favor is that the auto industry got left hanging by big oil. Historically, the two have worked in tandem, but while the auto industry crumbled around us big oil is raking it in.

True enough.
However, unless some legislature puts an element of urgency on the matter, not many can justify the expenses of experimental technology to advance the demand (see: clean air issues in Cali, after that things went fast and furious, in spite of all the fake tears of the industry. Because it can be done)
 

Cryozombie

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subsidize me and I'll buy one of these and at least get 40 mpg :D

48-4.jpg

Sorry... I didn't know you were a girl.
 

Xue Sheng

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Sorry... I didn't know you were a girl.

Isn't that cute....BUT ITS WRONG!!!!!!

Frankly if I Really think about it if I were to buy a new bike today it would likely be a BMW F 650 GS or a BMW F 800 GS. I do not like being stuck only on pavement

beyond that I will say nothing openly on teh web other than, I have a rather strong opinion of bikes and about 80% of the riders today that all basically boils own to wanna-be which is also why I tend to shy away from Harleys today. But go back 25 years I almost got something like this and if I had not hurt my back really bad and lost my job back then I would have got it. I was however looking for one of these at the time, without the windshield

But if you want to give me a one of these I will take it in a heartbeat... now show me how much of a man and a true harley guy you are and tell me what that is without looking it up or looking at the link :EG:

I will also take a shaft drive harley if you want to give me one




 

Cryozombie

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But if you want to give me a one of these I will take it in a heartbeat... now show me how much of a man and a true harley guy you are and tell me what that is without looking it up or looking at the link :EG:

I will also take a shaft drive harley if you want to give me one

I'll be honest with you... I don't ride a Harley. You know why? The only one I could afford was a sportster and all my Harley freinds insist only chicks ride them.

Of course now they give me the "Id rather push a Harley than ride anything else" B.S.

I'm perfectly happy with my nice shiny shaft drive Yami. Ive ridden it on nice summer days, in thunderstorms, in sub-freezing weather... never had an issue with it. :D
 

Xue Sheng

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I'll be honest with you... I don't ride a Harley. You know why? The only one I could afford was a sportster and all my Harley freinds insist only chicks ride them.

Of course now they give me the "Id rather push a Harley than ride anything else" B.S.

I'm perfectly happy with my nice shiny shaft drive Yami. Ive ridden it on nice summer days, in thunderstorms, in sub-freezing weather... never had an issue with it. :D

I pushed a Harley, several times, it was only a 125 but I can tell you it is not fun to push for miles and miles and about the time a guy on a honda passes you that pushing statement goes RIGHT out the window

My Seca 750 was faster than any Harley any of my friends had and it handled better too. But then throw in a Barnet Clutch and a set of custom pipes and it is not all that surprising. And my BMW was much quieter and smoother riding than any HD, but then the BMW taught me how much I hate fairings too.

By the way the bike in the last link is a 1956 Harley KHK and I REALLY want one. As for the Shaft drive HD, I saw one once in NH and it is from WW II and very very rare so if you happen to have one you don’t want, I’ll take it off your hands :D


And now back to your regularly scheduled post
 
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