Hang a heavy bag

Yokozuna514

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all rope stretches, particularly polypropylene climbing rope, just as chains will abraid and stretch,
All rope stretches = yes but some more than others.
Particularly Polypropylene = No, not at all true especially compared to nylon. Nylon rope has a high stretch factor so it stores a lot of energy that can be released when the rope snaps.
Chains afraid and stretch. Chains wear from abrasions and stretch through plastic deformation (generally at half the minimum breaking strength of the chain).

For this type of application chain is one of the best choices. I still would not recommend a spring in the assembly. Finding a spring with the proper dampening characteristics wouldve not easily done. If the spring is too soft it will amplify the forces. To strong and it isnt doing anything.
 

dvcochran

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KEEP IT AS A POLE DANCE ROOM!!!

Dont be stupid. Do you realize the things most of us here would give up to have a pole dance room in our home?

:) :) :)
You just never know what you will learn some someone's demographics do you!
 
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Badb0y

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Four WEDGE anchors are shown in the first photos. They are used for concrete applications so the thickness of the substrate is very important. For example, a 3/8" wedge anchor requires a minimum embedded depth of 1-1/2" to create the minimum holding value. For an installation allowing the minimum embedded depth for a 3/8" anchor, the hole in the substrate would have to be at least 2". Again these are for installations on CONCRETE surfaces only. They cannot be used in brick, block, or mortar joints, or wood. Wedge anchors are designed for STATIC loads only. Wedge anchors should NOT be used where the load will be exposed to vibrations or shock loads.
The gist is the plate shown is very good. If you are mounting to a wood frame the anchors cannot be used. That is where my explanation of creating a wooden plate that distributes the load is critical. To use the metal plate shown, you would through bolt it to the wooden frame. By spanning three joist and using 2x12 framing material (pine board), and #12 or #10 screws, you would have 12 anchor points. Do NOT use only two anchor points as @jobo suggested. IF there is some kind of existing framework in the room ceiling to through bolt the plate shown that would work even better.

The ceiling is concrete with iron inside. I almost killed my small driller (and myself too when found 2 times iron in the ceiling) when made the holes.
This frame method (if I understand correctly) is not really possible in this room. So if I want to use only this ceiling mount it is not really possible to make it?

So the following setups not good at all?

1.
ceiling mount -> stainless steel chain or some propylene rope to take it closer to the ground -> big carabiner -> spring -> big carabiner connected to the bag

2.
ceiling mount -> stainless steel chain or some propylene rope to take it closer to the ground -> big carabiner -> spring -> big carabiner connected to the bag

How about this 2 setup ? Should I completely forgot the swivel then?

Actually I have 2 ceiling mounts because for the hammock.
 
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Badb0y

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All rope stretches = yes but some more than others.
Particularly Polypropylene = No, not at all true especially compared to nylon. Nylon rope has a high stretch factor so it stores a lot of energy that can be released when the rope snaps.
Chains afraid and stretch. Chains wear from abrasions and stretch through plastic deformation (generally at half the minimum breaking strength of the chain).

For this type of application chain is one of the best choices. I still would not recommend a spring in the assembly. Finding a spring with the proper dampening characteristics wouldve not easily done. If the spring is too soft it will amplify the forces. To strong and it isnt doing anything.
My last comment, what do you think?
 
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Badb0y

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Lack of spin is a long term issue that can cause deformation of metal components or increased wear. Both issues will cause the integrity of the assembly to be compromised so swivels are generally a good idea on these kinds of assemblies, all things created equally.

You are 100% correct about more attention being put to the ceiling mount. The mount you use is very much like a lever point so the smaller the connection point the more lateral forces will cause strain on the mounting screws which will eventually fail. The bigger the mounting point (eg: using a mounting plate) the better the forces are spread out.
You mean put a big mounting plate and in the middle of the mounting plate I should put my mounting point?
 
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Badb0y

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that's because you used 4 small screws instead of two Big screws, if you install a screw properly, then you can hang several tones on it and it won't come out, just because you have dodgy diy skills doesn't mean that every one is as laxidasical

Can you draw or show your idea of setup ?
 

Yokozuna514

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The ceiling is concrete with iron inside. I almost killed my small driller (and myself too when found 2 times iron in the ceiling) when made the holes.
This frame method (if I understand correctly) is not really possible in this room. So if I want to use only this ceiling mount it is not really possible to make it?

So the following setups not good at all?

1.
ceiling mount -> stainless steel chain or some propylene rope to take it closer to the ground -> big carabiner -> spring -> big carabiner connected to the bag

2.
ceiling mount -> stainless steel chain or some propylene rope to take it closer to the ground -> big carabiner -> spring -> big carabiner connected to the bag

How about this 2 setup ? Should I completely forgot the swivel then?

Actually I have 2 ceiling mounts because for the hammock.
Yes to a mounting plate with a mounting point in the middle. Chain or braided polypropylene rope is fine. No spring. Yes a swivel is a good idea. Careful with carabiners because some are not rated. If you can used rated carabiners with a locking gate, you should be fine. Rated carabiners have the safe working load stamped on the side. Non rated carabiners have no load rating and can break easily.
 

dvcochran

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The ceiling is concrete with iron inside. I almost killed my small driller (and myself too when found 2 times iron in the ceiling) when made the holes.
This frame method (if I understand correctly) is not really possible in this room. So if I want to use only this ceiling mount it is not really possible to make it?

So the following setups not good at all?

1.
ceiling mount -> stainless steel chain or some propylene rope to take it closer to the ground -> big carabiner -> spring -> big carabiner connected to the bag

2.
ceiling mount -> stainless steel chain or some propylene rope to take it closer to the ground -> big carabiner -> spring -> big carabiner connected to the bag

How about this 2 setup ? Should I completely forgot the swivel then?

Actually I have 2 ceiling mounts because for the hammock.

I don't see a difference in options 1 & 2. While the rope would take some of the shock it will stretch and chaff. I would use the chain. The spring should help with shock quite a lot. If you use chain it will only spin so much before it gets taught and spins back. If this is a problem use the swivel.
I sounds like you are hitting rebar in the concrete. IF the concrete is strong and not punky, you should be ok with the vertical mount using wedge anchors, one at each corner. That said, if the concrete is old, or porous, the anchors will slip over time so check them often. If the concrete is punky the anchor will never hold because the concrete is crumbling.
Yes, if you have the metal and the tools, welder, and the skills it would not be very hard to make the mount. The larger the anchor the better. The pullout force of a 3/8" anchor is 1223lbs. vs. 1/2" anchor at 2999 so it nearly triples. Hand techniques should be less of a problem Repeated kicking, especially jumping kicks, etc... could be a problem.
Can you send photos of the hammock mounts? Could they be adequate?
Let me know how it goes.
 
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Badb0y

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Yes to a mounting plate with a mounting point in the middle. Chain or braided polypropylene rope is fine. No spring. Yes a swivel is a good idea. Careful with carabiners because some are not rated. If you can used rated carabiners with a locking gate, you should be fine. Rated carabiners have the safe working load stamped on the side. Non rated carabiners have no load rating and can break easily.
The hammock mounting plate is 20cmx10cm. Is it too small?
 
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Badb0y

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I don't see a difference in options 1 & 2. While the rope would take some of the shock it will stretch and chaff. I would use the chain. The spring should help with shock quite a lot. If you use chain it will only spin so much before it gets taught and spins back. If this is a problem use the swivel.
I sounds like you are hitting rebar in the concrete. IF the concrete is strong and not punky, you should be ok with the vertical mount using wedge anchors, one at each corner. That said, if the concrete is old, or porous, the anchors will slip over time so check them often. If the concrete is punky the anchor will never hold because the concrete is crumbling.
Yes, if you have the metal and the tools, welder, and the skills it would not be very hard to make the mount. The larger the anchor the better. The pullout force of a 3/8" anchor is 1223lbs. vs. 1/2" anchor at 2999 so it nearly triples. Hand techniques should be less of a problem Repeated kicking, especially jumping kicks, etc... could be a problem.
Can you send photos of the hammock mounts? Could they be adequate?
Let me know how it goes.
This is the hammock mount point, around 20cmx10cm.
1.jpg
 

Yokozuna514

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This is the hammock mount point, around 20cmx10cm.
1.jpg
Without being able to check how you can mount this plate securely, it is difficult to be sure if it is 'too small' but I suspect that this plate was meant to be attached to 1 joist. A hammock is not a punching bag, so this type of plate may be fine to hold a hammock that will gently swing back and forth but it probably won't hold a punching bag securely for any length of time. If you attached this plate to a hardwood slat, then attached the hardwood slat to 2 joists, you should be fine. Make sure the lag screws you use to screw the slat into the joists are long enough to hold the slat in place firmly. Adding the slat allows you to distribute the load between the 2 joists instead of 1.
 

dvcochran

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Yeye, I just made this room.
This is how it is:
A50-ECFF0-C947-4920-90-DD-C77-B72-CEBA9-E.jpg
I cannot tell for sure but those look like wedge anchors holding the mounting plates. Is this the location you want to hang the bag from? If so, you could make a simple spanner bar and mount it to both plates making the mount stronger. Then mount an eye bolt on the spanner bar (square tubing) and hang the chain from the eye bolt. Hard to tell from the photo but I think they are 1/4" anchors.
 
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Badb0y

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Without being able to check how you can mount this plate securely, it is difficult to be sure if it is 'too small' but I suspect that this plate was meant to be attached to 1 joist. A hammock is not a punching bag, so this type of plate may be fine to hold a hammock that will gently swing back and forth but it probably won't hold a punching bag securely for any length of time. If you attached this plate to a hardwood slat, then attached the hardwood slat to 2 joists, you should be fine. Make sure the lag screws you use to screw the slat into the joists are long enough to hold the slat in place firmly. Adding the slat allows you to distribute the load between the 2 joists instead of 1.
Ok, I assume a hardwood slat is a big thick slice of wood which can create a bridge between 2 joist. and mount the plate in the middle of the wood right?
 
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Badb0y

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I cannot tell for sure but those look like wedge anchors holding the mounting plates. Is this the location you want to hang the bag from? If so, you could make a simple spanner bar and mount it to both plates making the mount stronger. Then mount an eye bolt on the spanner bar (square tubing) and hang the chain from the eye bolt. Hard to tell from the photo but I think they are 1/4" anchors.
Yes, I want to hang it here I don't really want to make more holes.
Can you show me what is a spanner bar? I haven't find anything on google that can show me what is it. I'm not native ENG speaker so here I see many new words :D
This is the eyebolt right? :
35Z444_AS01
 

dvcochran

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Yes, I want to hang it here I don't really want to make more holes.
Can you show me what is a spanner bar? I haven't find anything on google that can show me what is it. I'm not native ENG speaker so here I see many new words :D
This is the eyebolt right? :
35Z444_AS01
Correct, that is the eyebolt.
A spanner is anything that bridges between the two mounting points, the eyebolts. For simplicity, you could use two carabiners and a piece of chain. A third carabiner at the mid point of the chain could hold the bag. Doing it this way may have more swing than you with though. If you use something rigid like a piece of square tubing to span between the two eyebolts the mounting point for the bag chain would also be rigid. Hard bolt the tubing to the eyebolts.
Can you unscrew the existing eyebolts from the mounting plates, leaving a threaded hole? It so, that would make it easy to mount the spanner to the plates. Just drill holes through the tubing and hard bolt it to the brackets. Then mount an eyebolt at the center of the spanner and you are good to go.
If I google spanner bar, I only see spanner tools which, of course, are different. I will try to find an example but the spanner can be made of anything substantial enough to hold the load. You already have the two mounting points for the spanner so most of the work has already been done. Let me know if I can help and how it goes.
 

Yokozuna514

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Ok, I assume a hardwood slat is a big thick slice of wood which can create a bridge between 2 joist. and mount the plate in the middle of the wood right?
Yes, it is a 'slice' of wood which can create a bridge between 2 joists. It is very similar to the idea of the 'spanner' that dvcochran suggested but different material. The idea is to use the hardwood slat or steel tubing to create a bridge between the two joists to spread the load. If you use a bolt, nut, washer assembly to attach your plate to the slat, you should be fine. You also want to use lag screws to attach the slat to the ceiling joists. Good luck.
 
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