first thing you learned

tshadowchaser

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to go along with the thread on what problems you had in your first year I thought it might be interesting to know what the first couple things you learned on your first day in class
 
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tshadowchaser

tshadowchaser

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in my first ever official class the first thing I was shown was where and when to bow and how. The next was where I would line up the reason why and how to stand in formation. After that there where many firsts
 

kuniggety

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In BJJ, in my first class, I think it was the cross collar choke. So, my intro to BJJ was getting choked out over and over. I loved it and came back for more. No, I'm not a masochist.
 

Transk53

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For me it was to keep my hands up and not stand straight on. In Judo I think it was to make sure we rolled properly, but being 30 years ago come March, don't remember too much.
 

LibbyW

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How to bow, how to make a fist, how to tie up my gi properly (as it kept coming open), how to stand properly (as I had bad posture), and how to say hello and goodbye in Japanese.
All this I remember quite well, the next year of Wado though...well I remember my kata, but the fundamentals have all been replaced by fencing and how to draw a katana properly :woot:
L
 

Kung Fu Wang

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what the first couple things you learned on your first day in class
I had a new student for his 1st day yesterday. He has some MA training in other system. Since "single lag" was he 1st move that I had learned, I always like to start from "single leg". I just explained how to obtain "single leg" by 8 different methods in the 1st 2 hours class.

1. uniform stance single leg - 扣 Kao,
2. mirror stance single leg - 掏 Tao,
3. uniform stance criss-cross single leg - 错 Cuo,
4. diagonal linear shaking single leg - 抖 Dou,
5. diagonal circular arm dragging single leg - 引 Yin,
6. knee striking single leg - 膝 Xi,
7. inner hooking single leg - 合 He,
8. shoulder striking single leg - 撞 Zhuang.
 
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Drose427

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Other than floor exercises (which include basics such as stances, blocks, kicks, etc.), I learned to not reach whatsoever. Many a funcussion were had for a while..
 

warriorArt

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My first class consisted of learning how to bow, how to line up, 2 kamae, one fist strike, one kick....and a few techniques using those kamae and strikes.

The most important things I learned were:
  1. What to expect from the class format, and how I am expected to act...
  2. To bring a notebook and take notes when possible. Why? Immediately after walking off the mat, I (and many other students) forget 75% of the material we go over in class (unless we literally went over a technique nearly 100 times). It's like a partial format of my C: drive. So notes are important.

The imprta
to go along with the thread on what problems you had in your first year I thought it might be interesting to know what the first couple things you learned on your first day in class
 

donald1

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i remember that, the first class, we did basic stretches first then basic kicking and punching drills afterwards finished with practice stances (mostly sanchin)
 

Buka

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After the initial rules on etiquette, the first thing I learned was a front horse stance and a rising block. I remember it like it was yesterday. And I went home and practiced it for hours more. (I was hooked like a junkie) Unfortunately, when you get involved in a new physical endeavor, the first thing you learn and practice becomes the most ingrained and most easily called forth. Swell.

Forty five years later - jobs spanning from bouncer, security, case worker at arrest units, fighter, to a career as a full time police officer, I have never used a horse stance nor a rising block in a physical confrontation, of which there have been too many to count.

American Karate, at that time, really didn't have a clue. Neither did I. I think that's why it was such a perfect fit!
 

Drose427

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After the initial rules on etiquette, the first thing I learned was a front horse stance and a rising block. I remember it like it was yesterday. And I went home and practiced it for hours more. (I was hooked like a junkie) Unfortunately, when you get involved in a new physical endeavor, the first thing you learn and practice becomes the most ingrained and most easily called forth. Swell.

Forty five years later - jobs spanning from bouncer, security, case worker at arrest units, fighter, to a career as a full time police officer, I have never used a horse stance nor a rising block in a physical confrontation, of which there have been too many to count.

American Karate, at that time, really didn't have a clue. Neither did I. I think that's why it was such a perfect fit!

Never used a rising block? Really? I'm not calling you a liar or calling tou out or anything like that lol I'm just surprised. I've never used proper stances in the ring or out, but I've seen block to the used used in both settings and have used it myself. Out of curiosity, do you recall what you did instead of it in situations where it would have applied? This is one of my favorite things about MA, different people who learn the same things get to choose and adapt what to use! The diversity is just awesome
 

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After the initial rules on etiquette, the first thing I learned was a front horse stance and a rising block. I remember it like it was yesterday. And I went home and practiced it for hours more. (I was hooked like a junkie) Unfortunately, when you get involved in a new physical endeavor, the first thing you learn and practice becomes the most ingrained and most easily called forth. Swell.

Forty five years later - jobs spanning from bouncer, security, case worker at arrest units, fighter, to a career as a full time police officer, I have never used a horse stance nor a rising block in a physical confrontation, of which there have been too many to count.

American Karate, at that time, really didn't have a clue. Neither did I. I think that's why it was such a perfect fit!

Really? While I agree that the static stances taught in forms are never used in a real situation, I've certainly found myself moving through all of them at different times. And you've never used a rising block?
Do you think it's just not effective, or is it just something about you that keeps you from using the rising block effectively? I'd assume it's you, because I know I've used the high block (or rising block, as you call it) a number of times. I recall a fellow in the psych hall who though he was Chuck Norris. He sucker punched the psych tech and threw a roundhouse kick at my head (it wasn't a half bad kick, either). One rising block later he fell over, allowing 6 people to pile on and end any further unpleasantness. OK, to be honest, this ended the violence. The unpleasantness was fixed by the application of Drug-Fu. Specifically the technique known as the B52.
 

Buka

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Never used a rising block? Really? I'm not calling you a liar or calling tou out or anything like that lol I'm just surprised. I've never used proper stances in the ring or out, but I've seen block to the used used in both settings and have used it myself. Out of curiosity, do you recall what you did instead of it in situations where it would have applied? This is one of my favorite things about MA, different people who learn the same things get to choose and adapt what to use! The diversity is just awesome

Really? While I agree that the static stances taught in forms are never used in a real situation, I've certainly found myself moving through all of them at different times. And you've never used a rising block?
Do you think it's just not effective, or is it just something about you that keeps you from using the rising block effectively? I'd assume it's you, because I know I've used the high block (or rising block, as you call it) a number of times. I recall a fellow in the psych hall who though he was Chuck Norris. He sucker punched the psych tech and threw a roundhouse kick at my head (it wasn't a half bad kick, either). One rising block later he fell over, allowing 6 people to pile on and end any further unpleasantness. OK, to be honest, this ended the violence. The unpleasantness was fixed by the application of Drug-Fu. Specifically the technique known as the B52.

No, swear to God I've never used a rising block in an actual situation. On a couple of occasions things came down towards my head, but I moved. Once to the right, once straight in. (both successfully) I've spent a lot of time boxing over the years, and American Karate has morphed to more of a boxing style (hand movements, anyway). So I tend to block or evade more like a boxer. When we jam, we tend to move more like a grappler (or an elbowing Muay Thai guy who's not very good). I like to jam everything when I can. I've found that people don't handle their plan well when pressed quick and hard. We call it fighting in the kitchen. I love the kitchen, it's where I live.

BUT - we still teach pretty much the same eight point blocking system as we did a zillion years ago. (rising block, inside block, outside block, down block....but the down block is fading) But we don't teach it from the beginning of training. On the rare occasions I teach brand new people, the first thing I teach is a fighting stance with the hands up protecting the head. Then jab, crosses and front kick. But I don't teach new people anymore, I'm not really at their classes, so I don't know what they hell they do.

I may very well use a rising block some day,(especially in a disarm) but it will never be from a horse stance, especially a front horse stance. The horse stance was originally taught to us primarily as an exercise stance for the legs, but I think there's better exercises for the legs. I don't know, I'm not really sure a horse stance is viable in any way for what we do. But, hey, that's just us. There's a whole lot better Martial Artists than us out there. (but they ain't ever gonna hit me from a damn horse stance....or I'll rising block the bastards!)

D-Dog, I think the rising block is very effective. It's just not what comes out in the situations I've been in. You know how it is, you don't think, you just move.
 

Dirty Dog

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D-Dog, I think the rising block is very effective. It's just not what comes out in the situations I've been in. You know how it is, you don't think, you just move.

That's why I said I leaned towards it being something about you. We all have our preferences and idiosyncrasies. And yours apparently do not favor the rising block.
I asked because there are certainly those here who have the attitude that if a technique doesn't work for them, it must be a bad or ineffective technique. I didn't expect you'd be one of them, and I'm glad to see my assumption confirmed. :)
 

Buka

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That's why I said I leaned towards it being something about you. We all have our preferences and idiosyncrasies. And yours apparently do not favor the rising block.
I asked because there are certainly those here who have the attitude that if a technique doesn't work for them, it must be a bad or ineffective technique. I didn't expect you'd be one of them, and I'm glad to see my assumption confirmed. :)

You know what I really like about the rising block? It's a hard block, it can hurt the person being blocked. I find it the hardest (hurtful) of the four basic blocks that I mentioned. I don't like hurting people any more than anyone else, but if there's something coming at me, I want to hurt it to teach it the error of it's ways.

Another odd thing.....considering all I've said. The rising block, because it was the very first thing I learned and practiced so long ago - comes out of me as fast or faster than anything else I can throw.
 

TheThirdAncestor

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When I went in for my first class, there were only two other students. It was a hot summer day and we did a full kettle bell workout. They were impressed I was able to hold a deep horse stance for close to a minute. They taught me some basic wrist escapes/locks and basic combinations (jab, cross, hook, uppercut). I sweat profusely during the whole thing but felt that it was a place I could call a home.
 

Bill Mattocks

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The very first thing I learned was how to enter and leave the dojo correctly (bowing).
How to wear a gi and tie an obi.
What the 'shomen' is (wall of honor) and how to show proper respect to it.

After that, I was shown how to make an Isshinryu fist (vertical fist, thumb on top) and how to walk (half-moon step, heel-toe, shoulder width).
Then I started on kihon (basics).
 
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