first colored belt tests

tshadowchaser

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This is open to all but I'm mostly interested in replies from those instructors that teach a kick /punch system (karate, kung fu,etc.)
What do you require for knowledge from your students for their first colored belt test? Do you require a certain number of forms, self defense, and ability to show their knowledge of blocks and punches> Do you require any knowledge of the system? Do you require different things depending on their age group ( if so why)
I am most interested in the 6-10 years age group but what this open to all under 16
 

PhotonGuy

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For my first colored belt test (yellow belt) you had to know the reverse punch, step over reverse punch, front kick, side kick, I believe the left jab, and the 2 forms basic 1 and basic 2 which were very simple, just stepping, blocking, and punching with the only difference between the forms is that basic 2 uses high blocks in place of punches in certain parts.
 

Drose427

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For us, white belts testing for yellow are expected to know:

3 forms
5 basic one steps
how to count to 10 in korean (tradition Korean or sinno Korean)
The basic blocks, stances and kicks
The above in korean
Other general terminology (Kwan ang nim, Dobahk, meaning of Moo Duk Kwan etc.)
how to do their break and the name of their break in Korean (Side Kick, Yup Chagi)
 

WaterGal

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For TKD - 1 form, 4 kicks, 4 blocks, 3 stances, straight punch, some basic Korean terminology, 1 board break, and sparring (they don't have to be any good yet - it's really just do they know the rules).

We have different requirements for Hapkido, but don't generally allow kids that young to do it.
 
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tshadowchaser

tshadowchaser

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Thats ok I'm interested in hearing the Hapkido requirements also even if it is for older students
 

PhotonGuy

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For us, white belts testing for yellow are expected to know:

3 forms
5 basic one steps
how to count to 10 in korean (tradition Korean or sinno Korean)
The basic blocks, stances and kicks
The above in korean
Other general terminology (Kwan ang nim, Dobahk, meaning of Moo Duk Kwan etc.)
how to do their break and the name of their break in Korean (Side Kick, Yup Chagi)

So, your school teaches not only the arts and the techniques but also stuff about the culture such as the language.
 

jks9199

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Generally, a green belt has one and a half to two years in our system. We expect that they'll have learned the first two forms, the basic punching, blocking, stance, kicking, and stepping drills to a reasonable degree
 
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PhotonGuy

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Generally, a green belt has one and a half to two years in our system. We expect that they'll have learned theft first two forms, the basic punchimg, blocking, stance, kicking, and ste]information drills to a reasonable degree

So I take it green belt must be an intermediate level at your place as it often is.
 
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tshadowchaser

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JKS is there a colored belt test before the green if so what are the requirements
 

jks9199

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JKS is there a colored belt test before the green if so what are the requirements
We do award the system patch, usually 6 months to a year in. Long enough we think you may stick a while, and have picked up enough of the basics to credibly represent us.
 

Dirty Dog

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The first "test" in our school requires the student to be able to get through Basic Form 1, which means they need to know the basic ready stance, front stance, low block, and middle punch. They'll also have to know basic things like bowing in and out, showing respect to seniors, that sort of thing.
This gets them their white belt and a uniform to wear.
The standard for performance of this form is pretty loose.
Moving up from here, 9th geup requires Basic 1 (to a higher standard), as well as 2 and 3. This adds in high blocks, high punches, side punches, back stance, horse stance, and outside middle block.
They'll also need to have basic proficiency with the front kick, round house, inside and outside crescent, side kick and hook kick.
We give them the school patch when they're about halfway ready to promote.
 

PhotonGuy

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It's the first color belt promotion. White, greEn, brown, and black.

So your ranking system sounds similar to the Gracie ranking system, in both the number of belts and the time it generally takes to advance a belt. Although the Gracie system also has a blue and purple belt but no green belt.
 

PhotonGuy

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The first "test" in our school requires the student to be able to get through Basic Form 1, which means they need to know the basic ready stance, front stance, low block, and middle punch. They'll also have to know basic things like bowing in and out, showing respect to seniors, that sort of thing.
So is it a test or just a demonstration?
 

Danny T

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Our first test is for white and students must know:
Basic Stances, Basic Footwork patterns, Front/Back/Side Falls, Forward Shoulder and Back Shoulder rolls, Basic punches, kicks, knees, elbows, Shrimping and reverse shrimping, 10 push ups, 10 Crunches, 10 Squats.
 

Dirty Dog

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So is it a test or just a demonstration?

Yes.

It's technically a test, but if a person is 10th geup, we don't allow them to test for 9th until they're performing consistently at a 9th geup level in class. Nobody is allowed to test until we know they're ready. If they're unable to perform on test day, for whatever reason, their promotion is "on hold" until they complete that portion of their test.
People occasionally draw a blank and forget a form due to nerves. Let them stop, take a deep breath, and try again.
Younger/smaller students occasionally have a promotion on hold because they could not complete the break. They keep trying every class till they complete it.

So in practice, it's a demo. The student is showing the other students what we, as instructors, already know: they're ready to move on to the next belt.

The "test" for white belt is generally very informal. There's no score, no "judge". It's often done prior to class, when the beginners are fiddling around in the dojang. Either Master Valdez or myself will say something like "Hey, have you been working on form 1? Show me..."
 

Gnarlie

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Blocks: Arae, Momtong, Olgul, Hansonnal Bakkat Makki.
Punches: Momtong Bandae Jireugi, Momtong Baro Jireugi.
Kicks: Typically combinations of kicks off the back leg: Ap Cha Olligi, Ap Chagi, Dollyo Chagi, Yeop Chagi, Naeryo Chagi, Dwi Chagi, Bandae Dollyo Chagi. Demonstrated on pads held by a black belt, combinations chosen by panel.
Stances: Moa Seogi (Attention) Naranhi Seogi (Junbi), Apkubi, Dwikubi, Kyorumsae (Sport Fighting Stance). Student demonstrates basic techniques in each stance. Some freestyle stepping combinations in fighting stance must be demonstrated.
Hoshinsul: Simple escape and run must be demonstrated, versus wrist, collar, and shoulder grabs
Kyokpa: Kick of the candidates choice versus 1cm for kids, 2.5cm for adults. Children are asked to make a commitment of their choice before they break.
Spirit and Overall Impression: The candidate will score well if they show enthusiasm and look like they are enjoying what they are doing and like it is real to them. A committed kihap is a good indicator, as is counting in Korean, and understanding Korean technique names and commands without the need for demonstration. Demonstration is available if required, but not the norm. It is also important that the candidate is not too tense in their movements.

A student would have to do very poorly not to succeed at 9th Keup. However, it is also quite difficult to score highly, and students are given feedback on how they performed, as an introduction to testing and what it means.
 

Drose427

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So, your school teaches not only the arts and the techniques but also stuff about the culture such as the language.

Yes, its is one of the more important aspects of training in our association.

Our KJN( and founder of our association) started training in Seoul in the 50's under Hwang Kee, so needless to say, preserving that Tradition and culture is hugely important to him.
 

PhotonGuy

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If a student can't fail than it is not really a test but just a demonstration. By failure I mean not passing on that go around and having to wait however many months or however long until they run another test before they can give it another attempt. If a student's test has to be put on hold for a day for whatever reason or if they have to stop and start a form over again that sometimes can happen but that's just a minor setback. If a student is performing up to the standards for the next rank and they know they are performing up to the standards because the instructor(s) tell them they're ready than there is no reason to be too nervous. A student might have some nervousness just from being scrutinized but its not the same as when there is a chance of failure for that testing time.
 

PhotonGuy

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Yes, its is one of the more important aspects of training in our association.

Our KJN( and founder of our association) started training in Seoul in the 50's under Hwang Kee, so needless to say, preserving that Tradition and culture is hugely important to him.

I see. My instructor at one time did require students to know the Japanese names of the techniques when they were being tested but he stopped doing that because some of the parents of the children that were taking classes started thinking that he was teaching some kind of religion when in fact he was just teaching a sport of Japanese origin, and so he stopped doing that.
 
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