Documentation of Classes

Indie12

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Just out of curiosity, how many Instructors/School Owners document every class?

(In other words, how many Instructors/School Owners, write up reports on every class? Reports such as what lesson was taught, what techniques were done, injuries, incidents, sparring sessions, etc??)

How many Instructors/School Owners keep STATISTICS every year on class activity?

Our organization does, we write up what are called "training reports" for documentation, statistic, and liability purposes! I'm just curious to see 'if' anyone else does something similar?
 

Haakon

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My guess is very few instructors do this, and even fewer do any kind of statistical analysis of the classes. I'm not a full time instructor (occasional substitute) and I just recently started tracking the classes I attend. What we worked on, which class it was - we have 2 a day - anything I worked on before/between/after classes and so on. I wish I'd started doing it years ago mainly because I'm curious about how much we worked on X vs Y and so. I started keeping notes in a Word doc, but am thinking about moving the info to a spreadsheet so I can track topics better.

How are you doing the analysis on what was taught over the course of the year? Using a spreadsheet to keep the notes then run numbers on key words, or a database, something else?
 
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Indie12

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My guess is very few instructors do this, and even fewer do any kind of statistical analysis of the classes. I'm not a full time instructor (occasional substitute) and I just recently started tracking the classes I attend. What we worked on, which class it was - we have 2 a day - anything I worked on before/between/after classes and so on. I wish I'd started doing it years ago mainly because I'm curious about how much we worked on X vs Y and so. I started keeping notes in a Word doc, but am thinking about moving the info to a spreadsheet so I can track topics better.

How are you doing the analysis on what was taught over the course of the year? Using a spreadsheet to keep the notes then run numbers on key words, or a database, something else?

Yeah, I'm guessing very very Instructors do this!!! Which is why I posted it on the forum just to see. (figuered- what the heck?)

We are doing quite well with the analysis, we started this back in 2005 and it's worked quite well. Because we go (or are suppose to go) 6 days a week, for 1-2 sessions per day and 2 hours each session, (I will note: that we've been cutting back due to budgeting and personnel work obligations) I figuered it was worth trying. For example: (In 2010 we had 219 classes, 2011 we actually anticipate a drop to about 160-170) So those are nice things to note, we also keep track of hours spent, # of injuries, and equipment usage, among other things.
Were able to see what we need to improve on and where at with personnel training.

Currently, we are using a combination of word documents, with spreadsheets, which actually work well. It's both flexible and allows us to pre-program what we need or want to keep track of. We run the numbers on a spreadsheet and word document, then run the program through our database to figure out all the stats. We've custom made it for us to make it easier to figure out!

We also keep track of (obviously- i hope!) student attendence, dues, schedules, years of training w/ us, etc....

I am currently looking at various software for student attendence, DUES track, and hopefully a program that will aid in the statistics and reports.
 

Carol

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Indie,

One of the guys in my training group has a school he ran out of his barn. He had a good enough draw to move in to a retail space so he partnered with his brother (an accountant) to make the move. The brother and I are in the same Linux users group, a few people in the group (not me) are developing the dojo software as a side project. The idea initially was going to be to track tuition payments and staff payroll, but they have since decided to roll that in to GNUcash and let that package handle all the money matters.

The dojo app will instead manage scheduling for the teachers and track all the aspects of attendance for the students, including what rank they are, and if they are on track to achieve the proper number of mat-hours for their coming promotion.

The cool thing about having the Linux Users Group do the software is being written for their needs, and it can be expanded and modified as the business needs change. Being a techno-geek myself I'm really fascinated to hear that you are getting a statistical analysis to work well for your school.

If you're ever up for brainstorming or sharing ideas, just holler! :)
 

rlobrecht

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The school I attend started tracking attendance a year or so ago, but I don't think they track anything else. The application they are tracking with was written by one of the junior instructors for a school project.

Rick
 
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Indie12

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Indie,

One of the guys in my training group has a school he ran out of his barn. He had a good enough draw to move in to a retail space so he partnered with his brother (an accountant) to make the move. The brother and I are in the same Linux users group, a few people in the group (not me) are developing the dojo software as a side project. The idea initially was going to be to track tuition payments and staff payroll, but they have since decided to roll that in to GNUcash and let that package handle all the money matters.

The dojo app will instead manage scheduling for the teachers and track all the aspects of attendance for the students, including what rank they are, and if they are on track to achieve the proper number of mat-hours for their coming promotion.

The cool thing about having the Linux Users Group do the software is being written for their needs, and it can be expanded and modified as the business needs change. Being a techno-geek myself I'm really fascinated to hear that you are getting a statistical analysis to work well for your school.

If you're ever up for brainstorming or sharing ideas, just holler! :)

That's interesting! I've found a few software programs I'll probably try, however, if your program keeps track of attendence, and can be suited for individual organization needs, than I'd definitely be interested!

I'd definitely be up for brainstorming or idea sharing, and I'd be very interested in hearing more about your program!
 

burleighgirly

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I am teaching dasar (beginner) classes for a few weeks while the instructor is away. More for my benefit than anyone else, I go in with a lesson plan - typed out on computer. It might mean that I'm a little less flexible (although I don't have to stick to the plan rigidly), but I know the students will achieve what I've aiming for and I won't get sidetracked. I don't include objectives - I guess I could, and I don't assess the class afterwards to reflect and include subjective information. It also means that I can also hand over what was covered when the instructor returns.
 

Buka

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Before you lined up for the start of class in my dojo, you "signed in". It was a big book on a nifty stand right there in front of you. I didn't usually make note of what was taught in class, it was easy enough to keep track in real time.

If you didn't sign in, you weren't there. Every couple weeks, when class was just getting under way, I would announce "Everybody get in push-up position!" They would, and would start doing push-ups. They were told - "stand up and start loosening up when your name is called."

If you forgot to sign in, you did push-ups for ninety minutes. Or tried to. You were not allowed to get up. There were no exceptions to this rule, not ever. Usually, nobody forgot to sign in a second time. I liked the book to keep track of how much everyone was training.
 

geezer

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Before you lined up for the start of class in my dojo, you "signed in"...If you forgot to sign in, you did push-ups for ninety minutes. Or tried to. You were not allowed to get up. There were no exceptions to this rule, not ever...

Boy, that sounds really over the top to me. I'm at the opposite end of the teaching spectrum. I have a small group that meets twice a week with no more than 6-8 active members attending at any given time. My students are all adults with career and family obligations, so many cannot attend every class. It's not ideal, but "it is what it is".

I teach informally and have to adjust my curriculum according to who shows up. Since I recently moved to an indoor studio (from training at a park), I am implementing a sign-in book and stating a lesson objective or "theme" for each night, and I often add a few supplemental notes or comments regarding the lesson. I gently encourage attendance by requiring a minimum level of participation before allowing testing. Beyond that, a rigorous lesson plan doesn't really suit my needs. If I were teaching commercially, I'm sure I'd approach this differently.
 

Dirty Dog

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Before you lined up for the start of class in my dojo, you "signed in". It was a big book on a nifty stand right there in front of you. I didn't usually make note of what was taught in class, it was easy enough to keep track in real time.

If you didn't sign in, you weren't there. Every couple weeks, when class was just getting under way, I would announce "Everybody get in push-up position!" They would, and would start doing push-ups. They were told - "stand up and start loosening up when your name is called."

If you forgot to sign in, you did push-ups for ninety minutes. Or tried to. You were not allowed to get up. There were no exceptions to this rule, not ever. Usually, nobody forgot to sign in a second time. I liked the book to keep track of how much everyone was training.

Wow... that seems... ridiculous.
What's more important, the training or the signin sheet?
 

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