Competition Class for Kids

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
27,356
Reaction score
8,704
Location
Hendersonville, NC
I’d love to, but she wouldn’t have a coach if she competed. They said they would try to help her, but with only one kid interested it would be difficult to promise to help. I understand it’s their business model. The other school does competition only so they don’t continue to work on forms, etc.



I would but her school sent a couple others to compete and they lost bad. I’m concerned about her going in and having no training at all. Her school trained the kids for one week before the competition and that was it. Ugh! This is so difficult.
You don't need a coach to compete the first time. She's not going to be in some world-class competition, and her record won't matter in the long run. Let her get her feet wet, so to speak. If she enjoys the competition, then that's all that really matters.
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
27,356
Reaction score
8,704
Location
Hendersonville, NC
Were they excommunicated from the art of Taekwondo after the loss?

Let her enjoy learning tkd where she enjoys it.

Let her go and compete and let her learn Dont worry about winning. You and her will learn strategies and figure out what works for her as you go. Winning will come.
To the OP, I'm quoting CB's post, because he has a kid who is a fantastic competitor. This is one of the people you want advice from, IMO.
 
OP
K

kiwi

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
24
Reaction score
2
She’s the one asking to go to both places which is possible, but not sure if we should at this age. She likes both places. No, she doesn’t want to leave her place, just wants to go to both.
 
OP
K

kiwi

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
24
Reaction score
2
You don't need a coach to compete the first time. She's not going to be in some world-class competition, and her record won't matter in the long run. Let her get her feet wet, so to speak. If she enjoys the competition, then that's all that really matters.

I wasn’t aware of this. I thought coaches were needed from some that we saw.
 
Last edited:

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
27,356
Reaction score
8,704
Location
Hendersonville, NC
I wasn’t aware of this. I thought coaches were needed from some that we saw.
You need somebody to stand in that "coach" position, but you don't need a trained coach at first. At the lowest level, it's a support position, as others have said. If you don't take it too seriously, then you can do it. If you're going to make a loss a really big deal, yell at the refs, etc., then you need someone else to stand in that position.

But the point is that what she needs is some low-key exposure to competition. If she comes in dead last the first few times, that's not a big deal - she's learning something new, and sucking at it is actually part of the process.
 

dvcochran

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 7, 2017
Messages
6,977
Reaction score
2,264
Location
Southeast U.S.
She’s the one asking to go to both places which is possible, but not sure if we should at this age. She likes both places. No, she doesn’t want to leave her place, just wants to go to both.
Have you became familiar with the sparring format she would be in? Coaching mostly comes in to play when a person is competing for multiple rounds. Shouting from the sideline can be a penalty in Olympic circuit level matches.
As others have said, I would recommend staying in one circle until she truly out grows the competition at that level. Unless her current Dojang is grossly lacking there should be more than enough there for her. If not I suggest finding a single school that offers more of a sport environment. That said, the purely sport environment is missing a lot of the mental discipline found in a more traditional environment.
 

gorilla2

Yellow Belt
Joined
Apr 15, 2019
Messages
37
Reaction score
11
My daughter has fallen in love with taekwondo. She goes to class about 3 times a day, 5-6 days a week. She’s really good for a young kid.

Her school doesn’t offer any sort of competition style sparring only more self defense for higher belts and mostly for older kids. She is considering competing in sparring but she is young. Is it best to start her now with a serious school? She can stay with her current school that she loves and join the competition school. I’m assuming it’s best to get her started young but I am concerned about the sport and potential head kicks as kids get older.

We are very new to this and didn’t really think she’d fall in love like this!

Any advice you can offer?
This is a difficult situation...where are you located...I might be able to help with a referral...what style of TKD?
 

WaterGal

Master of Arts
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,746
Reaction score
574
My daughter has fallen in love with taekwondo. She goes to class about 3 times a day, 5-6 days a week. She’s really good for a young kid.

Her school doesn’t offer any sort of competition style sparring only more self defense for higher belts and mostly for older kids. She is considering competing in sparring but she is young. Is it best to start her now with a serious school? She can stay with her current school that she loves and join the competition school. I’m assuming it’s best to get her started young but I am concerned about the sport and potential head kicks as kids get older.

We are very new to this and didn’t really think she’d fall in love like this!

Any advice you can offer?

She goes to 15 classes a week and doesn't do any sparring? What do they do in class that much?

As others have said, you don't need a professional coach for her to go to local competitions, especially as a color belt. She just needs to learn the rules, practice sparring and go try. A lot of tournaments offer poomse (forms) and board breaking divisions, as well. For a lot of kids, it's less intimidating to do those their first time competing anyway.

I'd recommend you start by taking her to a local tournament and see what it's like. They usually have a registration packet available online that explains at least a bit about the rules, and you can ask on here for more info if you want. Once you have a good feel for the tournament rules, you can register her and act as her coach.

I don't know what country you're in, or what organization you want to be part of. But in the US, IIRC, you'd need to be a USA Taekwondo certified associate coach to take her to the USAT national championships, and I think to take her to states once she's 12 and a black belt. Basically that just means you submit to a background check and watch some videos on the USAT website about how to work with kids.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
9,388
Reaction score
3,424
Location
New York
She goes to 15 classes a week and doesn't do any sparring? What do they do in class that much?

As others have said, you don't need a professional coach for her to go to local competitions, especially as a color belt. She just needs to learn the rules, practice sparring and go try. A lot of tournaments offer poomse (forms) and board breaking divisions, as well. For a lot of kids, it's less intimidating to do those their first time competing anyway.

I'd recommend you start by taking her to a local tournament and see what it's like. They usually have a registration packet available online that explains at least a bit about the rules, and you can ask on here for more info if you want. Once you have a good feel for the tournament rules, you can register her and act as her coach.

I don't know what country you're in, or what organization you want to be part of. But in the US, IIRC, you'd need to be a USA Taekwondo certified associate coach to take her to the USAT national championships, and I think to take her to states once she's 12 and a black belt. Basically that just means you submit to a background check and watch some videos on the USAT website about how to work with kids.
She only said they dont do competition style sparring, not that they don't spar. I took it to mean that the ruleset at the dojo is different than the local competitions
 

WaterGal

Master of Arts
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,746
Reaction score
574
She only said they dont do competition style sparring, not that they don't spar. I took it to mean that the ruleset at the dojo is different than the local competitions

Ah, that makes more sense. More info on this would be helpful.
 
OP
K

kiwi

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
24
Reaction score
2
This is a difficult situation...where are you located...I might be able to help with a referral...what style of TKD?

Is there a way to send a message? It would be great if you knew anybody. :)
 
OP
K

kiwi

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
24
Reaction score
2
She goes to 15 classes a week and doesn't do any sparring? What do they do in class that much?

As others have said, you don't need a professional coach for her to go to local competitions, especially as a color belt. She just needs to learn the rules, practice sparring and go try. A lot of tournaments offer poomse (forms) and board breaking divisions, as well. For a lot of kids, it's less intimidating to do those their first time competing anyway.

I'd recommend you start by taking her to a local tournament and see what it's like. They usually have a registration packet available online that explains at least a bit about the rules, and you can ask on here for more info if you want. Once you have a good feel for the tournament rules, you can register her and act as her coach.

I don't know what country you're in, or what organization you want to be part of. But in the US, IIRC, you'd need to be a USA Taekwondo certified associate coach to take her to the USAT national championships, and I think to take her to states once she's 12 and a black belt. Basically that just means you submit to a background check and watch some videos on the USAT website about how to work with kids.

Sparring classes are separate. They only do them once a week after you get to higher levels. Problem is there aren’t any kids around her age. Class involves warm up, drills, forms/kicking/sparring practice for testing requirements. No actual sparring with gear. She’s been in a poomsae tournament which she liked at the time and now finds boring she says.

How much time would coaching take? Honestly, I’m not sure I have time for the research and coaching parts.
 
OP
K

kiwi

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
24
Reaction score
2
She only said they dont do competition style sparring, not that they don't spar. I took it to mean that the ruleset at the dojo is different than the local competitions

Yes no competition sparring. Only more self defense with actual gear. Different places use different gear so we are trying to decide what to actually buy for her since it’s a small investment. We would not mind her doing some sparring if they have it at her current school if she has time since I think it would make her all around better, but not the main focus if we go elsewhere.

Tonight, she told me she really wants to go to the other school too and stay at her current school. The competition school does not require her to leave her school or vice versa. They are completely separate from one another. But...expensive!
 

CB Jones

Senior Master
Joined
Feb 20, 2017
Messages
3,924
Reaction score
1,991
Location
Saline
Yes no competition sparring. Only more self defense with actual gear. Different places use different gear so we are trying to decide what to actually buy for her since it’s a small investment. We would not mind her doing some sparring if they have it at her current school if she has time since I think it would make her all around better, but not the main focus if we go elsewhere.

Tonight, she told me she really wants to go to the other school too and stay at her current school. The competition school does not require her to leave her school or vice versa. They are completely separate from one another. But...expensive!

What worked for my son and I.

The dojo we are at spars alot....but does little competition sparring. It is almost all continuous sparring with no scoring.

At competitions, I coach my son. We learned by trial and error and by observing what works and doesnt work from other competitors. We took what we learned and worked on "his style" of fighting (in the driveway of our home). Mainly figured out what he is best at, figured out a strategy to make that work, and how to cover up what he struggles with.

And to clarify...my coaching is just letting him know in between matches what I observe...not being aggressive enough, not committing to technique, over use of a technique, under use of a technique, etc...

Also you will find out black belts have no problem with giving you tips and advice.

It was all trial and error. We made mistakes and learned from them. All in all...we have had a great 8.5 years of figuring it out.

Whether or not you try the other school is something you will have to figure out. But there is a very good chance at some point you and her will have to choose one or the other.

Also, competing can get expensive pretty quick. But also can be great fun and a chance for her to test her ability.
 

CB Jones

Senior Master
Joined
Feb 20, 2017
Messages
3,924
Reaction score
1,991
Location
Saline
Also, maybe try the competition school and if it doesnt work out you could always return to your old school.

Only you and her can figure out what's best for yalls situation.
 

CB Jones

Senior Master
Joined
Feb 20, 2017
Messages
3,924
Reaction score
1,991
Location
Saline
Also, here is some advice take it for what is worth...keep her involved in other activities.

From my observations, kids that do not participate in any other activities tend to burnout faster. Other activities tend to reduce the burnout.

IMO, playing basketball and baseball greatly helped my son keep his interest up by forcing him to back off training some.
 

CB Jones

Senior Master
Joined
Feb 20, 2017
Messages
3,924
Reaction score
1,991
Location
Saline
Sorry for the reply overload....but also this is a good site for advice. You can post videos or ask questions relating to competing and get some good advice....it is a very mixed lot of styles and levels of experience.
 

WaterGal

Master of Arts
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,746
Reaction score
574
Sparring classes are separate. They only do them once a week after you get to higher levels. Problem is there aren’t any kids around her age. Class involves warm up, drills, forms/kicking/sparring practice for testing requirements. No actual sparring with gear. She’s been in a poomsae tournament which she liked at the time and now finds boring she says.

How much time would coaching take? Honestly, I’m not sure I have time for the research and coaching parts.

I think the difficult part of coaching for you will be learning the sparring rules and helping her get some sparring practice in. If she's close to black/poom belt and has never done sparring, she'll be at a disadvantage compared with other competitors who've been doing sparring for a year or more and are more comfortable with it.

I coach our students at local tournaments a couple times a year. The actual coaching part isn't that hard - it's mostly helping them warm up, make sure they know where to go, being moral support, objecting if the opponent does an illegal move and the ref doesn't catch it, and reassuring the kid if they lose. Now, the fact that I'm familiar with it makes it easier for sure. You'll have a harder learning curve. But it's not rocket science.

What does "sparring practice for testing requirements" entail?
 
OP
K

kiwi

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
24
Reaction score
2
I think the difficult part of coaching for you will be learning the sparring rules and helping her get some sparring practice in. If she's close to black/poom belt and has never done sparring, she'll be at a disadvantage compared with other competitors who've been doing sparring for a year or more and are more comfortable with it.

I coach our students at local tournaments a couple times a year. The actual coaching part isn't that hard - it's mostly helping them warm up, make sure they know where to go, being moral support, objecting if the opponent does an illegal move and the ref doesn't catch it, and reassuring the kid if they lose. Now, the fact that I'm familiar with it makes it easier for sure. You'll have a harder learning curve. But it's not rocket science.

What does "sparring practice for testing requirements" entail?

The sparring practice is knowing certain moves for a particular belt. Sometimes they practice against others, but only as very light contact. It’s more of the self defense sparring not competition. I did notice that those who didn’t have any “competition” style skills for sparring were at a disadvantage at the competition. At least those who were from her school.

Maybe as I get more familiar with taekwondo, I could coach, but I’m not sure I really have time to understand the rules or know how to figure out illegal moves. For now anyway.
 

Latest Discussions

Top