Choosing a MA

cadaens

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Hello to all,

I'm new to MA and am wondering if I someone could offer their advice about choosing a style. I recently took a class for shaolin-do kung fu and felt really overwhelmed with all that was getting thrown at me. I'm not the most coordinated person in the world, so I need something that maybe isn't that complicated or intense. I guess I am wondering if there are any martial arts forms that maybe start a little more slowly or don't have quite so much to learn at the beginning, but still give you a good work out and maybe even teach some valuable self defense techniques. I'm 5'4, F, 125 lbs.

Thanks!
 

MA-Caver

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As it's been said (here) many times before... it will depend upon many things/factors/wants/needs/desires. What kind of shape are you in? What do you hope to achieve from your (overall) training (can be more than one achievement)? What do you want to do to your opponent/attacker? All these and many more things have to be considered before choosing the RIGHT art for you.
TKD may be good, but then again so would Kenpo. Wing Chun Kung Fu might suit you and then Jujitsu may be even better.

Use the search engine to find other related "what is best art for a beginner" threads to help with your quest.

Good luck! Keep us posted and Welcome To Martial Talk!
 

Journeyman

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It sounds like Krav Maga might be the sort of thing you're looking for. It's pretty intense aerobically but there aren't a lot of complicated flashy techniques.
 

MJS

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Hello to all,

I'm new to MA and am wondering if I someone could offer their advice about choosing a style. I recently took a class for shaolin-do kung fu and felt really overwhelmed with all that was getting thrown at me. I'm not the most coordinated person in the world, so I need something that maybe isn't that complicated or intense. I guess I am wondering if there are any martial arts forms that maybe start a little more slowly or don't have quite so much to learn at the beginning, but still give you a good work out and maybe even teach some valuable self defense techniques. I'm 5'4, F, 125 lbs.

Thanks!

First off...Welcome to Martial Talk!!:ultracool

As for your question...one thing to keep in mind, whenever you start something new, is to take your time and go at your pace, not the pace of the class. I'd rather go slow and miss a few reps of whatever is being worked, than try to keep up and throw sloppy strikes, kicks, etc.

What are you looking to get out of your training? I'd start off by listing your goals and then start looking around at schools. Watch a few classes, ask questions, etc., and from there, make your decision.

Good luck in your search! :)

Mike
 

Jade Tigress

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First off...Welcome to Martial Talk!!:ultracool

As for your question...one thing to keep in mind, whenever you start something new, is to take your time and go at your pace, not the pace of the class. I'd rather go slow and miss a few reps of whatever is being worked, than try to keep up and throw sloppy strikes, kicks, etc.

What are you looking to get out of your training? I'd start off by listing your goals and then start looking around at schools. Watch a few classes, ask questions, etc., and from there, make your decision.

Good luck in your search! :)

Mike

Welcome to Martial Talk! And I ditto what Mike said.

You're going to feel overwhelmed at first. Don't let it scare you away. Things do start to come together. If you feel this is just not the style for you, I encourage visiting as many schools as you can. See what a good fit for you is. When you find something that really makes your heart pump realize there are still going to be times you will feel overwhelmed. But that's common. Hang in there and you'll be surprised at how you progress.

Good luck and keep us posted! :asian:
 

Kacey

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Welcome!

I agree with Mike and Jade... when I started TKD I was horribly uncoordinated, but the instructor realized I was having problems and broke things down into small steps I could understand and repeat, and then recombined them. If your instructor isn't doing this, I'd suggest asking for help - it may not be the MA, but the instructor's style, that is causing problems, and any good instructor will help you with whatever problems you're having.

Let us know how it goes.
 

still learning

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Hello, Have you look/try? JUDO! You will find it is a very effective art. Learning to take a fall is something most fighters need to learn.

Judo is mostly a throwing art, most people under estimate in real situtions...you will find it one the most effective arts. Consider trying it?....My son and daughter does High School Judo and we do Kempo too!....Aloha
 

IWishToLearn

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EVERYBODY gets overwhelmed when they first start. :) I'm an 8 year veteran of several arts and I still get overwhelmed when I experience new things. I went from a traditional japanese style to a semi-traditional korean style, and while it only took me a short time to learn the forms - the rest of the curriculum was overwhelming physically due to using different body parts in far greater amounts of time. Then I went to a non-traditional kenpo offshoot and was very overwhelmed by the teaching style - very fast paced with no emphasis on basics. Then I went to t'ai chi - which was great for helping me with my balance and coordination. Now I've found my home in Kenpo. Where I was once again overwhelmed by the basics when I started. Took me a couple months to really get my bearings, and that was a couple hours a night of practice. I'm still nowhere near what I call proficient (very high standards of myself and my students) - but I'm learning, growing, and improving every day. Keep at it.

Time will smooth the rough edges and you'll feel more comfortable the more you practice.
 

Robert Lee

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It takes to to understand both mind and body Of Ma training. We do not know our boday as well as we tend to think we do. What ever art you choose you will find it a challenge after a time it becomes easyer. You size well okinawin people were not tall or large. Gung Fu well agin its something new at first You will learn if you try. No art has all the answers And some are easyer to learn then others Its up to you to learn if you want it bad enough you will.
 

Grenadier

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This is where it's critical to seek out a proficient instructor that knows how to instruct all levels of students.

Almost anyone with reasonable knowledge of a system, and can count to 10, can teach an advanced class, and look pretty darn good at doing it, too, since for most practical purposes, the students teach themselves at that level.

However, one of the litmus tests for an instructor's proficiency is how he can teach beginners of all types, especially those who may have difficulties in the beginning. Even the most complex systems can be well taught to someone who struggles, as long as the instructor places it forth in a systematic, streamlined manner that is easy to understand.

That being said, many a traditional Karate system, Japanese or Okinawan, could be to your liking. Something like Shotokan Karate would definitely give you a good workout, and at the same time, a good instructor would strongly emphasize your fundmanetal techniques in a manner that is not difficult to learn. Of course it will get more complex later on, but by that time, you will already have had a good foundation in place.

There are many other systems that would fit the bill, but let your own eyes be the judge. I strongly encourage you to visit several schools in your area, and watch a beginner's class at each location, and speak with the instructors as well as maybe some of the students there.
 

Selfcritical

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Hello to all,

I'm new to MA and am wondering if I someone could offer their advice about choosing a style. I recently took a class for shaolin-do kung fu and felt really overwhelmed with all that was getting thrown at me. I'm not the most coordinated person in the world, so I need something that maybe isn't that complicated or intense. I guess I am wondering if there are any martial arts forms that maybe start a little more slowly or don't have quite so much to learn at the beginning, but still give you a good work out and maybe even teach some valuable self defense techniques. I'm 5'4, F, 125 lbs.

Thanks!


What city do you live in? Directing toward schools is generally more helpful than directing toward styles.
 

charyuop

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Overwhelmed most of the times can be good, it can push you to train harder. Just last Tuesday in my Tai Chi class they introduced a movement called Repulse Monkey. I had done it in the past so I know it, but they way it was taught it here it is very different. The one I faced the other day required a greater coordination of movements between arms and legs.
During class I would simply get stuck, start the movement and while the others were going on I would just stop coz I would mess up. I kept thinking "I will never learn it (moreover think that in my mind/muscles the movement kept coming out like the way I knew it), why we can't do it the way I know it? Easier and prettier in style".
I spent all yesterday and up till 5 minutes ago of today in my backyard practicing this movement and I admit that I am pretty much close to what I am supposed to do.

Every Martial Art at first will seem overwhelming to you, both in mind and physical. Your body is not used to the new movements and your mind is required to face new kind of coordinations that up to today you had never been required. You don't get it at first it is ok....practice is the way of success. Think that your future Master didn't get where he is in 5 minutes, but through years of training and practice...and I am sure overwhelming too!
 

Selfcritical

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Overwhelmed most of the times can be good, it can push you to train harder. Just last Tuesday in my Tai Chi class they introduced a movement called Repulse Monkey. I had done it in the past so I know it, but they way it was taught it here it is very different. The one I faced the other day required a greater coordination of movements between arms and legs.
During class I would simply get stuck, start the movement and while the others were going on I would just stop coz I would mess up. I kept thinking "I will never learn it (moreover think that in my mind/muscles the movement kept coming out like the way I knew it), why we can't do it the way I know it? Easier and prettier in style".
I spent all yesterday and up till 5 minutes ago of today in my backyard practicing this movement and I admit that I am pretty much close to what I am supposed to do.

Every Martial Art at first will seem overwhelming to you, both in mind and physical. Your body is not used to the new movements and your mind is required to face new kind of coordinations that up to today you had never been required. You don't get it at first it is ok....practice is the way of success. Think that your future Master didn't get where he is in 5 minutes, but through years of training and practice...and I am sure overwhelming too!

That being said, I will humbly suggest that moving past shaolin-do is a Good Thing
 

Mr White Dragon

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I've been told by my Grandmaster that, "The quality of the instructor is much more important than the style of martial arts practiced." Your first step when looking into a school or style should be to oversee the instructor. Most instructors will allow you to sit in on their classes, so I would recommend you do that for a few classes. This will allow you to see how the instructor teaches and you will be able to see if the art is taught at a comfortable pace for you.

On a side not, the more powerful, direct arts tend to be taught at a slower pace such as Karate, Tae Kwon Do and Tang Soo Do. Whereas many of the flowery arts are more complex and faster such as Kung Fu and Wushu.
 

bushidomartialarts

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the style you choose is far less important than the school where you enroll. find the schools withing an area you're willing to drive to, then really talk with the head instructor and even take an intro course.

a quality instructor in a school with a supportive and challenging student culture is what you need to look for.
 

airdawg

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Any art can be made simple with the correct instruction. If you're uncorrdinated, maybe you need to chalenge yourself to become very corrdinated. No better field to fix that, than MA. Good luck finding your art.
 
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