Learning 2 MA's at Once

Daniel Sullivan

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Like Drac, I generally advocate one at a time.

In this case, there is no conflict between the arts. My main reason for this is mainly with regards to having a time commitment at two different locations and under two different instructors.

The other part is that double training means that you will most likely gain proficiency in both at a slower rate than if you trained in either one individually. This is not bad; just a different pace.

Either way, best wishes to you and welcome to MT!

Daniel
 

bradtash

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hey mate,

as a few of the other posters have mentioned, they compliment each other quite well. i have been doing muay thai for over a year and have recently added BJJ to my training and so far have to say that i am very impressed with i am learning and have had no issues integrating the two styles with each other.
as others have mentioned allow yourself enough time to manage two styles, i train muay thai 2 nights a week and BJJ 2 nights a week and have 1 day rest in between and use the weekends for my own training (weights and bag work) though i am not so worried if i miss weekend workouts.
i can definately see how some posters are saying to learn one martial art completley before begining another, this avoids confusion and allows more time to gain greater knowledge of that particular style. however IMO muay thai and BJJ are perfect to mix together.
 

LuckyKBoxer

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I do not know why I am always so amazed to see ignorant responses on to these types of questions.

5 days a week is more then most people train in a week, These two arts are completely complementary, and do not contradict each other. I think you will get alot of doing both at the same time as long as you have good instruction, are self motivated, stay committed, and it matches your short and long term goals.

Do yourself a favor, figure out what you goal is for training period. Once you have figured out what your goal for training is... self defense? Better physical conditioning? Want to be a sports fighter? or something different?
To many people know they want to do a martial art, but never really pin down why. They get involved in one, or with an instructor that does not match up with those goals and then leave with a strong sense of disatisfaction.

There are plenty of times when a person can take multiple martial arts and get alot of out it, there are others when people will be confused, that depends alot on the individual, how smart they are, how quick they learn, how much they retain, and how much they self study and are able to self correct, only you can answer that question. By coming up with short and long term goals, and revisiting those regularly you will have a great idea on when you are on track and when you are off track.
 

Stonecold

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The only way to find out is to try and see if you can handle it.
Some people can only do one @ a time, others can do more.
But don't do both half assed. You only get out what your willing to put in.
Stay focused on what you really want.
 

Draven

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Hey Everyone,

I'm 23 and just started Muay Thai a month and a half ago. I absolutely love it and have been training 4 or 5 days a weeks (1hr sessions). I'm hoping to start training in BJJ as well and they do offer it at my gym. I was wondering if you all think I should stick with Muay Thai for awhile longer and then maybe start BJJ down the line, or switch my training schedule to something like 3 days Muay Thai and 2 days BJJ a week.
Thanks for the advice!

I say do what you think you can do. If you think you can only learn one MA then pick one if you think you can do both do it. I have a student learning Jujitsu & Ninjitsu with me, TKD with his church since he's a "youth pastor" and his church pastor is using TKD as reinforcement tool for the kids in church & training with some MMA group. So he's basicly training 6 days a week. 2 hours a day 5 days a week with me, & about 3 to 8 hours on saturday with sunday off. His MMA group & church group both meet on Saturday & Sunday's but he misses the Sunday MMA stuff for church service...

Learning is kinda funny some people can multi-task their learning and other's can't, as long as you ain't over pushing yourself...
 

TheLegend731

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I think it's a great idea. You will be learning two different sides of fighting. If you effectively combine those two while you're learning, you might just have one up on whoever you face in the ring or octagon.

I'd do the same if I had the resources and time.

That is a killer combination though... I'm sure it will be demanding on your body and mentality, but if you come out through it all, more power to you.
 

Yondanchris

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Personally I would focus on one martial art at a time until you reach an intermediate to advanced (Brown-Black Belt) leven before messing with another art, especially if they are similar (two styles of Kenpo, or Karate).
Although I could see cross training in Kickboxing and BJJ at the same time due to the probability of the training be isolated and not overlaping in any way.

My humble and ignorant .02 cents

Chris
 

Tez3

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Or you could just train Sanshou :EG:

That would be good! Too many people go into MMA thinking it's just two arts and doing BJJ and MT is sufficient, it's not. They are good to train alongside each other but it won't make you an MMA fighter, not even if you add boxing and wrestling tbh. For that you need a good gym/club that will teach you how to be an all round fighter with good core skills, that means going into depth with your art not just skimming off the top.
 

dnovice

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1) I would make a list of the martial arts i want to learn
2) I would allocate a certain amount of time to become decent at one.
3) train in that one martial art very intensely... bootcamp style... become decent...
4) After you get to a proficiency level you like you can add the other martial art.
 

KenpoVzla

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I would also say no. Train and become an expert in one and then if you still feel the need jump to another.

Even then, it would still be wise to make sure if you want to cross-reference or to cross-train. If you're not sure what that means, take a look at this article by Jamie SeaBrook:

http://www.helium.com/items/293506-cross-training-vs-cross-referencing-in-martial-arts

Cross-Referencing might give you the benefits you're looking for and do not directly need to be involved with the other Martial Art style.
 

ETinCYQX

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A loaded question...Speaking for myself I wouldnt touch another discipline until I mastered one..

Can you really master any martial art?

I'm 1st geup in TKD. I just started training in Judo as well. I think having a good understanding of one art before you start another is a good idea but not nessecary. The most difficult part for me is the ettiquette involved in each art but that's not a big deal.
 

Daniel Sullivan

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Can you really master any martial art?
The term master can be used at different levels. What I think Drac means is technically proficient and practically competent. To say that one 'masters' a technique or a skill set does not imply complete mastery in the sense that you are referring to. Often, I think that as MA practitioners, we read more into the term master, both noun and verb, than is necessarily being communicated.

I'm 1st geup in TKD. I just started training in Judo as well. I think having a good understanding of one art before you start another is a good idea but not nessecary. The most difficult part for me is the ettiquette involved in each art but that's not a big deal.
Judo is a nice compliment to taekwondo, and certainly different enough that it will not cause any confusion. Certainly will round out your skills! :)

Daniel
 

ETinCYQX

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The term master can be used at different levels. What I think Drac means is technically proficient and practically competent. To say that one 'masters' a technique or a skill set does not imply complete mastery in the sense that you are referring to. Often, I think that as MA practitioners, we read more into the term master, both noun and verb, than is necessarily being communicated.


Judo is a nice compliment to taekwondo, and certainly different enough that it will not cause any confusion. Certainly will round out your skills! :)

Daniel

I didn't think about it that way actually. Good point. I feel that I have a reasonably good background in TKD and I think having that already established is a benefit to training in both disciplines rather than learning two at once from scratch.

Judo seems to be exactly what I was looking for. I strongly considered a number of arts but the difference from Tae Kwon Do, the seriousness and maturity of the practitioners, and in particular the local club all pointed me to Judo. Very very happy with my choice.
 

Josh Oakley

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Hey Everyone,

I'm 23 and just started Muay Thai a month and a half ago. I absolutely love it and have been training 4 or 5 days a weeks (1hr sessions). I'm hoping to start training in BJJ as well and they do offer it at my gym. I was wondering if you all think I should stick with Muay Thai for awhile longer and then maybe start BJJ down the line, or switch my training schedule to something like 3 days Muay Thai and 2 days BJJ a week.
Thanks for the advice!

My first thought is: Why do you train muay Thai? What it your objective? Most of the posters have given good advice, but that advise is based on their personal goals.

So, really, the best way to figure out if you should take up a second style is to identify your goals. Are you in martial arts for competition, self-defense, police, military, or exercise? I'll probably be disagreeing with some people when I say this, but all of these are valid goals IF you know what your goals are. The approach for all of these goals, however, will vary drastically. Here's what I'd advise, depending on what your answer is:

1) If your goal is exercise: I would say, since each art works the muscles differently, it's a great way to mix it up and keep the muscle condition going. Just don't neglect your regular weight-training and cardio. And keep in mind what your goal is. Your program won't be designed so that you could actually hold your own in a fight against a trained fighter. That doesn't make this a bad goal, you just have to understand your limitations.

2) If your goal is competition: Well, we'll have to break it down even more. Within your goal of competition, do you plan on competing for fun or professionally? Do you plan on sticking on the muay thai circuit, the Jujitsu circuit, the MMA circuit, or some mixture of the three?

If for instance you plan on going pro in the Muay Thai circuit, I'd not take up jujitsu any time in the near future. Focus on establishing yourself in the one circuit before adding a second. The same is true for the jujitsu circuit. and get a specialized coach for either of these.

If you're looking to go pro in MMA, these could both potentially help you out, but now the coach you choose becomes critical. It takes a very good coach, and even a team of coaches, to make it in MMA. Look around and find one you'd like to have coach you.

If you're just competing for the fun of it, do whatever you want!

4) For MILITARY/LEO: These can both help, but you really need to find an instructor with experience training soldiers and/or police officers. Again, the style is not as important as the instructor. Ask around and shop around.

5) For self-defense: talk with your instructor. But having knowledge of both couldn't hurt, seeing as these are very different skills.
 

BloodMoney

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Go hard I say, train both. I cant possibly see what bad could come from working hard and cross training multiple arts.

Ive done the same, started out with striking arts and am now moving to BJJ. As BJJ is the newer of the two arts and ive got a few years Chun behind me im actually putting in more hours per week on BJJ than I am at Chun, purely because im loving getting into a new art again.

If I had the time I would cross train another art too to be honest, maybe a weapon art so I am doing one striking, one weapon and one ground.

In ten years time do you want to be starting BJJ and be excellent at Muay Thai or be able to look back and say "ive trained BJJ and Muay Thai for ten years" and be damn good at both. I know which one I would choose.
 
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