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Kung Fu Wang

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Figuring out combos can be done by anyone who has accomplished some moderate baseline of training. What I am talking about is how I get the student through that moderate baseline, and then beyond.
Of course you have to teach a set of tools to your students first. After they have learned that set of tools, they can then apply strategy method and grow from there.

Tools in your toolbox can have:

- jab, cross, hook, uppercut, overhand, hammer fist, ...
- front toes kick, front heel kick, side kick, roundhouse kick, ...
- finger lock, wrist lock, elbow lock, shoulder lock, head lock, spine lock, leg lock, ...
- single leg, double legs, hip throw, foot sweep, leg twist, leg block, leg lift, ...

So, the training path can be: toolbox ->principle/strategy
 

Flying Crane

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Of course you have to teach a set of tools to your students first. After they have learned that set of tools, they can then apply strategy method and grow from there.

Tools in your toolbox can have:

- jab, cross, hook, uppercut, overhand, hammer fist, ...
- front toes kick, front heel kick, side kick, roundhouse kick, ...
- finger lock, wrist lock, elbow lock, shoulder lock, head lock, spine lock, leg lock, ...
- single leg, double legs, hip throw, foot sweep, leg twist, leg block, leg lift, ...

So, the training path can be: toolbox ->principle/strategy
I would put it at principles, toolbox, strategy.
 

isshinryuronin

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Does the grip really matter so much? With the katana in particular, we are talking about an extremely sharp blade. If the wrong fingers are carrying the bulk of the grip or the hands are not spaced quite right on the hilt or the angle of the blade is a micro-degree off from perfect, is it really going to matter when that blade severs an arm or cuts a torso in half? I would say at that point its purely academic and doesnt matter.
It absolutely matters. It is not that easy to cut thru an arm or shoulder, or even a well rolled tatami mat. There is a certain amount of resistance and shock upon impact. One's grip is vital, as is the angle of the blade. Imagine the shock on your hands and arm when striking the strong, springy steel of an opponent's blade in actual full power deadly combat! Once in a while, seemingly pointless details matter quite a bit.
 

Flying Crane

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It absolutely matters. It is not that easy to cut thru an arm or shoulder, or even a well rolled tatami mat. There is a certain amount of resistance and shock upon impact. One's grip is vital, as is the angle of the blade. Imagine the shock on your hands and arm when striking the strong, springy steel of an opponent's blade in actual full power deadly combat! Once in a while, seemingly pointless details matter quite a bit.
You are actually making my point. I am responding to earlier comments suggesting aikido was overly complicated while swordsmanship was more direct and simple. I was being semi-facetious. Both methods have a lot of details that in fact do matter in order to reach a level of high skill. Basic functionality can be reached without mastery of those details, but high skill requires mastery of the details.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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I would put it at principles, toolbox, strategy.
What is your definition of principle?

My definition of principle is "how to deal with certain situation". For example, to bounce or redirect your opponent's punching arm are principles. Also how to catch a kicking leg is principle.

By using my definition, if you put principle before toolbox, you may have to teach "how to block a punch" before you teach "how to punch".
 

Flying Crane

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What is your definition of principle?

My definition of principle is "how to deal with certain situation". For example, to bounce or redirect your opponent's punching arm are principles. Also how to catch a kicking leg is principle.

By using my definition, if you put principle before toolbox, you may have to teach "how to block a punch" before you teach "how to punch".
My definition of principles hinge more on rooting, body connection, and power development. Techniques are built on those principles, and strategy is how you would use those techniques to effectively deal with a problem.
 

drop bear

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It absolutely matters. It is not that easy to cut thru an arm or shoulder, or even a well rolled tatami mat. There is a certain amount of resistance and shock upon impact. One's grip is vital, as is the angle of the blade. Imagine the shock on your hands and arm when striking the strong, springy steel of an opponent's blade in actual full power deadly combat! Once in a while, seemingly pointless details matter quite a bit.
As compared to what though?

People are amazingly handy at using tools in just day to day life.
 

skribs

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I remember doing kata in both TKD and Hapkido. The instructor would correct some aspect or our positioning by fractions an inch. Very cool, except bodies, punches and kicks follow their own path. I would have to say, as far as technique, sparring or combat is concerned, I learned very little from the katas that couldnt be learned during student to student exchanges. I suppose that they take discipline and stickwithitness, but folks have those traits in non kata type arts also. I took them as the artistic expression of the art.
It's a different kind of discipline. I'm not saying that one is better in general. But different folks need different kinds of disciplines.

My nephew's attitude benefited greatly from Taekwondo. I could not see him benefitting the same from BJJ. There are other kids that I think do benefit greatly from BJJ, because there's different rough edges on their attitude that need to be refined.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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My definition of principles hinge more on rooting, body connection, and power development. Techniques are built on those principles, and strategy is how you would use those techniques to effectively deal with a problem.
I'll consider:

- rooting,
- body connection, and
- power development

are part of the tool development. You can't develop any tool without those.

For example, when one train jab, because he needs to learn weight distribution, he will have to train:

- 4-6 stance,
- 3-7 stance,
- bow-arrow stance,
- monkey stance,
- side cat stance,
- golden rooster stance.
- ...

Since a complete toolbox may take many years to construct, a partial toolbox should be good enough to start using the strategy approach.
 
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