Are my boxing instructors any good?

ToughGuy

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I recently started taking boxing lessons to learn self-defense and to gain confidence. I am a meek person and dont like confrontation.

Ive gone to two gyms. I have concerns about the quality of teaching at both of them. The first gym had a lot of students, maybe ten or so per class. The instructor isnt able to give a lot of individual attention. He has students start sparring (gently) after two classes.

After two and half months with him, I switched to a different gym. This gym usually only has about four students per class. Unlike the first gym, the instructor (a former boxer) doesnt give much instruction or correct what were doing, so I wonder if hes teaching us very much.

He does have us throw combinations at him while he wears mitts, so at least he closely watches us for part of the class. He also has us practice throwing and blocking punches with each other in part of the class. That part of the class seems useful. I have gone to this gym for 8 weeks.

I dont feel confident that either of these gyms are doing a good job teaching boxing. Maybe I dont know enough about it to understand. I dont feel like Im any good at it so far. I dont think Ive made much progress. I dont feel encouraged. It seems like it will take a long, long time to get any skill. I dont know if Ill stick with it. Im not doing this because I enjoy it.
 

Deaf Smith

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ToughGuy,

How often do you practice outside the gym? Do you weight lift or jog?

What you learn in the gym is only a part. If you don't practice outside the class you it will take a real long time to get good.

And while boxing is good, remember if it's for self-defense, then the other guy won't be playing by rules. And by that I mean low blows rule!

Deaf
 
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ToughGuy

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I practice the boxing a little outside the gym. I exercise a bit, but I'm not training to go 10 rounds. I just want to learn how to throw and block punches, and gain some confidence for confrontational situations.
 

jarrod

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toughguy, there's good & bad news about boxing. the good new is that anyone can become a competent boxer. the bad news is that if you're not a natural, it does take a while.

i really sympathise with you. i used to be very meek & unsure of myself. all i can tell you is that if you keep at it, whether it's boxing or something else, it WILL get better. but you have to be realistic. you're not going to become an invincible badass overnight. less than a year of boxing really isn't all that much. if boxing isn't working for you, try another martial sport or art. now to the practical part of your question.

the first coach you described is the type i learn well from. i think sparring is an essential part of self defense. the second coach may know a lot, but you might just have to ask him questions. if you noticed you get hit a lot with a certain punch, ask him why. if you can't land a certain punch of your own, ask him how to set it up. this actually goes for both coaches. now if neither of them can answer your questions in a way that makes sense to you, then you might want to move on. ultimately though, you're going to want to find something that you enjoy AND gives you self defense skills. you will learn faster if you like what you're doing.

take care of yourself my man, i have been there & i know what you are going through. you can do it though.

jf
 
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ToughGuy

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I don't expect to become a badass overnight, if ever. I would like to feel like I'm making some progress though. If I don't feel like I'm progressing after six months, I don't know if I'll continue.

I could be wrong, but it seems like my new class is more of a workout than learning how to box; since the instructor hardly gives any instruction. I've never heard him make any comments or corrections on how we throw punches in class. When we hit the heavy bag, all he says it to increase our intensity of punching.
 

jarrod

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yes it sounds like the 2nd coach is running fitness class. why do you feel like you're not making progress with the first coach? are you still getting hit just as much in sparring as you used to?

jf
 

jks9199

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yes it sounds like the 2nd coach is running fitness class. why do you feel like you're not making progress with the first coach? are you still getting hit just as much in sparring as you used to?

jf
There's only so much instruction that can really be done in classical boxing. Once you get the basic dynamics of the punches (jab, straight or overhand, hook, uppercut, and some people would count the cross separate from the straight/overhand), and parries/blocks... there's just not much to do, but drill them in.

Perhaps you're looking for something that's just not there. I'd suggest you investigate several martial arts schools. You've got an idea of what you're looking for, and where you want to go with it. When you look at the schools, keep that in mind. Some styles you might consider looking at are krav maga, judo, bando, or several classical karate styles -- if they're taught in a fairly traditional manner, not kiddie-kung fu. That's by no means a complete list...
 

jarrod

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There's only so much instruction that can really be done in classical boxing. Once you get the basic dynamics of the punches (jab, straight or overhand, hook, uppercut, and some people would count the cross separate from the straight/overhand), and parries/blocks... there's just not much to do, but drill them in.

my man, i have seen your posts about quite a bit & have lots of respect for you, but you could not be more wrong about this. boxing is simple on the surface but there is SO much to it. boxing is every bit as technical as any eastern martial art.

footwork alone can take a lifetime to master. head movement too. in-fighting is an entirely specialized subset of boxing that you don't see that much of but still takes a lot of study. then there are tactics: how do you fight a longer boxer? how about a brawler? or a runner? or a southpaw?

then there are the various tricks. did you see the latest ricky hatton fight on HBO? every time his oppoent clinched, hatton made him carry his weight & wear out his muscles. he also worked the laces of his gloves into his opponent's eyes once. it was a near perfect fight against a defensive jabber & clincher like that. you've also got to learn how to move in the clinch, or else a strong opponent can wrestle you into the corner & unload.

i could go on, but there are as many boxing styles as there are boxers. a good coach should let you figure out what kind of boxer YOU are.

jf
 

JadecloudAlchemist

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Toughguy

Are you asking your coach for advice or questions?

For me I ask alot of questions. If I don't know something and I want to know I ask someone who knows.

You I am guessing are paying for this so get your money's worth.

Your coach needs to correct you if you are doing things wrong.
He should develop you to your highest potential.

Granted he may not be able to spoon feed you and he may not know how you feel. Talk your thoughts over who knows maybe they are great boxers but not good coaches.
 
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ToughGuy

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At the first gym there are so many students that the instructor didn't seem to have much time to watch me and comment on how I was doing. There wasn't a lot of time to ask him questions. I didn't feel like I was getting any better after two and half months there, although I suppose that may not be a lot of time.

I thought the new gym would be better because the classes are smaller. I haven't thought of many questions to ask my new instructor. We haven't done any sparring there. Since he doesn't give much instruction, I ask him if technique wasn't important right now. He said from watching me that my technique was good, which I doubt. I'm afraid I'll make him mad if I say the way my other instructor taught seemed better.

I tried jiu-jitsu for about a year and never got very good at it, and didn't feel like I was getting better. It didn't give me any confidence that I would know what to do in a fight.
 

JadecloudAlchemist

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Toughguy

Thats good you talked to your teacher about your progress at least he commented on it.

Don't get discouraged it sounds like you just started out.
It takes time to develop your skills.

When you are throwing punches and something seems off to you discuss it with your teacher so he can push you along. Talk to your classmates maybe one of them just has great footwork and has tips for you to develop it.

As long as the door to communcation is open things should work out fine.
 

still learning

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Hello, The nice thing about BOXING is you learn by doing.....and it takes a good six months of the body to get use to being hit and stop hurting as much.

The skill you are learning? .....will take time to build up...if you expect to learn boxing skills in a few months? ....and the coach to tell you everything in a few months of training? ....NOPE....a little at a time!

Most likely he will teach you at your speed of learning....STAY WITH IT!

The difference between learning Boxing/Judo training and martial arts?

You will become more skill from learning/actual doing than going thru the motions....(one day you will understand this?)

That is why? ...boxers/Judo guys in the begining can use there skill right away!

Boxer shorts? ......hines is better

Aloha,
 

myusername

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I agree Boxing isn't as simple as it looks. It is very difficult for people on the outside to judge whether your instructors are good or not. It sounds to me that you haven't quite gelled with their teaching style so it may just a case of finding an instructor that teaches in way that you learn. The thing is it is more than just punching a mitt or bag. You need to learn the footwork and how to move like a boxer. You should certainly have been taught these basics before anything else. Now my boxing instructor taught me stance, footwork before anything else. Now often I am given a set exercise, or combination or drill to do and left to it whilst he instructs others. That is fine, as someone before said, you learn by constant practice but there is always input and the opportunity to ask questions if I'm not "feeling it". If you not getting this extra element of refinement from your tutor then may be look else where.
 

Bodhisattva

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I recently started taking boxing lessons to learn self-defense and to gain confidence. I am a meek person and dont like confrontation.

Ive gone to two gyms. I have concerns about the quality of teaching at both of them. The first gym had a lot of students, maybe ten or so per class. The instructor isnt able to give a lot of individual attention. He has students start sparring (gently) after two classes.

After two and half months with him, I switched to a different gym. This gym usually only has about four students per class. Unlike the first gym, the instructor (a former boxer) doesnt give much instruction or correct what were doing, so I wonder if hes teaching us very much.

He does have us throw combinations at him while he wears mitts, so at least he closely watches us for part of the class. He also has us practice throwing and blocking punches with each other in part of the class. That part of the class seems useful. I have gone to this gym for 8 weeks.

I dont feel confident that either of these gyms are doing a good job teaching boxing. Maybe I dont know enough about it to understand. I dont feel like Im any good at it so far. I dont think Ive made much progress. I dont feel encouraged. It seems like it will take a long, long time to get any skill. I dont know if Ill stick with it. Im not doing this because I enjoy it.

Keep checking out other gyms.

Keep training at these until you find something better.
 

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