Allowing Parents to Watch

Kempojujutsu

Master Black Belt
Joined
Mar 24, 2002
Messages
1,058
Reaction score
14
Location
Effingham, Illinois
I was wondering how many of you allow your parents to watch while their kids do karate. In my school I allow the parents, grandparents, who ever to watch their kids enjoy the martial arts. I also have heard of schools not letting anyone watch also.
Bob
:asian:
 

Les

Brown Belt
Joined
May 21, 2002
Messages
418
Reaction score
4
Location
United Kingdom, Europe
I have mixed feelings about this one.

I always used to have parents watching, and even provided free coffee for them.

I started to change my mind when I had a few instances where parents came onto the floor during a class to "coach" their kids.

I got round this by making a barrier which only those traininwere allowed through.

The final straw was during a Junior Grading Test.

The kids had worked hard, and myself and twoother instructors had gone into a side room to discuss their performance.

Suddenly, the door opened, and in walked a mother who had two kids in the class. before we could say anything she told us we should not pass ***** as his performance was not good enough.

While I was speechless, one of my assistant instructors asked her how long she had been teaching Kenpo, and what her rank was.

The other instructor informed her that she was putting her children's efforts at risk by coming into our private room during the test.

In one of my clubs, parents are allowed to watch, but they are told at the start that they DO NOT interfere when a class is in progress.

I usually say to them, "You don't go to school with your kids and sit in the classroom, do you?"

Les
 

Seig

Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Apr 18, 2002
Messages
8,069
Reaction score
25
Location
Mountaineer Martial Arts - Shepherdstown,WV
I keep it very simple. I encourage the parents to watch. I allow them to stay inside if they stay quiet, I tell them to go outside if they cannot. If they get adamant, i simply tell them that I do not tell them how to raise their child at home and I appreciate the same courtesy.
 
G

GouRonin

Guest
When I was younger I used to encourage other women to watch, even join in.

But that's not the point here.

I think that the barrier thing is also good for keeping the sound and distraction away from the people working out.

I hate it when you're doing something and spectators are so loud, even if they are not directly talking to the people on the floor, it's annoying.
 

Nightingale

Senior Master
MTS Alumni
Joined
Apr 24, 2002
Messages
2,768
Reaction score
14
Location
California
Its a good thing to let the parents watch. they have a right to know what you're doing to their kid, and better that they're there than have their kid come home and say "sensei hit me in the face" better to have the parent there and see that you were sparring the kid and the kid moved his face into your fist.

my parents never came to watch my karate, so I don't know how they would have reacted. They've never seen it, not once. They were always at my brother's soccer and baseball games and practices.
 

tarabos

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Jul 12, 2002
Messages
777
Reaction score
0
Location
Kennett Square, Pennsylvania
even though the barrier is a good idea...it's not foolproof.

our main classroom is completely closed off except for a door going in, and a door going into the bag/weight room in the back. the parents are able to watch through a large window in the wall in the lobby.

even with the shut door, we still get parents just walking right into the classroom to either complain about their child not "learning enough" or to put their two sense in. it happens very rarely, but when it does happen, the parents wind up looking a bit foolish and usually apologize later on or just stop their brazen behavior...
 

Yari

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 1, 2002
Messages
1,364
Reaction score
22
Location
rhus, Denmark
I let parents watch, and if they want to discuss anythin I tell them that it's after class, and not while there is class. If they want to participate, they have to sign up and go through the normal learning of the techniques , grades and instructor course before thay are allowed on the mat.

/Yari
 
T

TangSooGuy

Guest
I let parents watch, and have yet to have anyone be disruptive. As others have said before, parents have the right to know what's going on with their kids. Also if you are secure in what you're doing, it's a great means of advertisement- parents talk to other parents....good old fashioned word-of mouth...

I also find it gets the parents more interested in the martial arts, they start seeing this not as only something their children do, but as something they can do WITH their children....

I've yet to have anyone be disruptive, but if they were, i'd ask them to stop. If they continued, I wuld ask them to leave, as their actions were disrupting the class in progress. If they start ranting and raving about how they pay blah blah blahand they're going to pull the kid out, I'd say fine, if that's what you feel you need to do, go ahead.

I 'd rather lose one student that have a continually disruptive presence, but I would also rather allow the parents to have some interaction with their child's training, so I say let them watch unless it becomes a problem.
 

thesensei

Green Belt
Joined
Sep 1, 2002
Messages
166
Reaction score
0
Location
Wagoner, OK
I have always allowed parents to watch, but I do try to have an 'orientation' session with them about once a quarter(for all the new parents). I've been teaching children's classes for about 1 year, with up to 20 in one class, and i haven't had any problems.

But, i'm also training in another school(cross-training), and the instructor there allows parents to watch. fHe doesn't seem to have a problem with it, but the parents seem to interact with their children during class much more than i feel is appropriate. Just have to find the right balance.

just my .02.

JB
 
A

Abbax8

Guest
In my class parents are always invited in to watch. They must remove their shoes and sit on the floor in anza like the students. I actually perfer to have them observe me teach their children as then there can be no misunderstanding as to what goes on in class. I even involve the parents to assist when feasible, hold the other end of a belt when we are jumping over it, help with the ukemi balls, etc. The parents enjoy it and I have had some join, I teach a mixed class, adults and kids. Just my 2 cents.

Peace
Dennis
 
OP
K

Kempojujutsu

Master Black Belt
Joined
Mar 24, 2002
Messages
1,058
Reaction score
14
Location
Effingham, Illinois
Abbax8, Do you mean seiza? Sitting on your knees. If yes. What do you do if Grandma, or grandpa bring Suzy and they can't sit on their knees. I had to sit in seiza for one of my black belt promotions for about and hour. My legs fell asleep, and it was uncomfortable as hell. I couldn't amagine parents or grandparents sitting like that for long time. My students and parents sit in chairs or padded benches while they wait on class to start.
Bob :asian:
 
A

Abbax8

Guest
No, I mean Anza- sitting on the floor with the legs crossed in front of you. Also called easy sitting by some. Seiza is the kneeling position you describe or also known as formal sitting.

Peace
Dennis
 
A

Abbax8

Guest
Also, if a family member is unable to sit in anza, then we fetch them a chair or they sit on one of the folding mats.

Peace
Dennis
 

Latest Discussions

Top