Your kids first dojo should be at home

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Gerry Seymour

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It was normal for fathers to teach their son(s) boxing when I grew up. My father Was in a boxing Club as a youngster and so as kids we learned how to spar. I'm not saying that all kids would enjoy it but it was like this in the 70s.
I think that's normal where the dad has some training and/or experience. Lots of dad never got that, though.
 

Steve

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You keep using this 1950s reference as if it's an insult. But I will accept it as a compliment. Many people from this era have invested greatly in me. Also in many parts of the world the culture is like the 1950s, not everyone exists in a woke world. And many people want to raise children counter to what is popular in culture. You can set your own values and are not doomed to the current cultural norms.
I do? Im pretty sure this is the first time Ive said anything like this. But it sure is true in this case. The sexism alone is pretty lame. And I think it's a little childish to fantasize about an era in the USA that never actually existed outside of Main Street at Disneyland and on TV.
You also missed the rest of my post. Ill sum up. It sounds like the thrust of your original post is that you think parents can teach values to kids. I agree. In the real world, there are a lot of great ways to do this. Horsing around with your kids and a pair of boxing gloves can be really fun. But so are a lot of other things that will have the same benefits. And none of this is limited to sons and fathers.

Second, it's just as important for your kids to learn social skills, which can be taught through participation in clubs, bands, or any sport. A well rounded, happy, loved child who hasn't been taught by dad how to punch will be much better equipped to deal with bullies than a kid who knows how to fight.

And if you really want to teach your kid some practical fighting skills, there isn't much that can beat the wrestling team. But honestly, anything that gets your kid out and exercising is good enough... at least until they're a little older.
 

Gerry Seymour

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not everyone has a martial arts club in their area. a set of York weights, bench, boxing bag. simple as that.
Sure, dad could teach the use of those things....if he knows how to use them. Otherwise, he might just teach stuff that doesn't work, or (especially in the case of the weights) might lead to injury in the long term.
 
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Reliably? By what measure?

See, I seem to recall a lot of kids who couldn't defend themselves while I was growing up. They got bullied a lot. I stepped in and ended fights for these kids, because they couldn't. I wasn't taught that by my dad (though he did teach me the ethos for it).
It's a question of what you are measuring and determining is important. The degree of proficiency was likely related to the culture of the time and era.

Vikings, the Native American tribes that roamed the great plains, people groups like the Mongals, probably trained their kids to a higher degree of combat related skills than cultures that existed on farming. But in most cases parents have done a decent job of preparing their of spring to face whatever dangers they expect them to encounter in their world.

No doubt they didn't have access to the internet, I'm sure that would have been helpful. But again I'm not suggesting training is done completely or even majority by parents. Not in any way am I suggesting that. There is great value in training under professional instruction.
 
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I do? Im pretty sure this is the first time Ive said anything like this. But it sure is true in this case. The sexism alone is pretty lame. And I think it's a little childish to fantasize about an era in the USA that never actually existed outside of Main Street at Disneyland and on TV.
You also missed the rest of my post. Ill sum up. It sounds like the thrust of your original post is that you think parents can teach values to kids. I agree. In the real world, there are a lot of great ways to do this. Horsing around with your kids and a pair of boxing gloves can be really fun. But so are a lot of other things that will have the same benefits. And none of this is limited to sons and fathers.

Second, it's just as important for your kids to learn social skills, which can be taught through participation in clubs, bands, or any sport. A well rounded, happy, loved child who hasn't been taught by dad how to punch will be much better equipped to deal with bullies than a kid who knows how to fight.

And if you really want to teach your kid some practical fighting skills, there isn't much that can beat the wrestling team. But honestly, anything that gets your kid out and exercising is good enough... at least until they're a little older.
If I recall you made a 1950s reference in the post about "not hitting woman."
 

Gerry Seymour

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It's a question of what you are measuring and determining is important. The degree of proficiency was likely related to the culture of the time and era.

Vikings, the Native American tribes that roamed the great plains, people groups like the Mongals, probably trained their kids to a higher degree of combat related skills than cultures that existed on farming. But in most cases parents have done a decent job of preparing their of spring to face whatever dangers they expect them to encounter in their world.

No doubt they didn't have access to the internet, I'm sure that would have been helpful. But again I'm not suggesting training is done completely or even majority by parents. Not in any way am I suggesting that. There is great value in training under professional instruction.
Of course some cultured trained kids to a higher degree for combat, if they were regularly expecting combat (so the group had experience in that). But was that training in all those cultures purely father-son? Or were there experienced fighters who taught the kids?

And I suspect lumping all native Americans into a group for this is just guessing. Some of the tribes were fairly peaceful by nature, so probably weren't teaching fighting skills as regularly as that (though they'd probably have been teaching hunting skills, some of which would translate).
 
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If I recall you made a 1950s reference in the post about "not hitting woman."
My mistake, I checked. That 1950s insult was from Iklawson, not you. You guys think alike I guess. But regardless I still take it as a compliment. And I grew up in that type of culture, so I know it existed.
 

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Sure you do.

And you never watch TV, or watch grown men play sports, or whatever else.
Gerry i have my Raging bull suit. if people want to play computer games..fine but just don織t have a narrow mind thinking you can learn from a computer game....honestly guys 不
 

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If I recall you made a 1950s reference in the post about "not hitting woman."

Maybe. Im curious now what you think I said. Context does matter but I guess its possible this isnt the first time folks have engaged this particular fantasy.

If it helps, should anyone romanticize being a ninja or a Viking, Ill point that out to.

You seem a little fixated on this, though, and Im concerned youre missing the actual point. I could sum it up again but this would make the third time.
 

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My mistake, I checked. That 1950s insult was from Iklawson, not you. You guys think alike I guess. But regardless I still take it as a compliment. And I grew up in that type of culture, so I know it existed.
Now that is funny.
 

Gerry Seymour

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Gerry i have my Raging bull suit. if people want to play computer games..fine but just don織t have a narrow mind thinking you can learn from a computer game....honestly guys 不
Maybe go back and read what was written. Nobody suggested borrowing a strategy from the game. It was an analogy. Which you choose to mock because you don't think the source of the analogy is fitting for a grownup.
 

Jimmythebull

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I think we need to get back on topic here. Not talk about video games. Honestly if i showed this threads to some of my mates they would die laughing. :)
 
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If it helps, should anyone romanticize being a ninja or a Viking, Ill point that out to.
Steve, first I don't romanticize these cultures. There is a lot of messed up thinking in some of these old warrior cultures. Some good, some bad, like all cultures.

Second, my life isn't what you might be imagining. At times I spend extended periods of time with people who would have more in common with rural communities in Poland during WW2, rather than the modern suburbs of America.

I am intentionally and unintentionally way out of touch and out of step with how you think I should view the world to be a well adjusted human being.
 
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