Your GPS May Betray You

MA-Caver

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Aug 21, 2003
Messages
14,960
Reaction score
312
Location
Chattanooga, TN
Read the article and watch the video (after you turn off the sound to block the annoying ad) this is important information... it's SD for the family, your home, your car... your life.
GPS Can Lead a Criminal to Your Home


Unlocked Doors and Programmed Home Devices Make for Easy Prey for Criminals


By GARY WYNN
April 9, 2009
http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=7293049&page=1 GPS devices help an estimated 15 million U.S. cars navigate through the streets, but the convenient technology also may serve as a way in for criminals looking to rob your home. Security expert Bill Stanton explains necessary home safety measures.

A 'GMA' Security Test

Nicole Perdue and her husband, Jim Perdue, do not tend to worry often about their safety. The parents of three boys ages 3, 5 and 7, are more concerned about the daily goings on in the children's lives.
"When I've got three little kids and I'm worried about who I'm gonna pick up from where and not forgetting someone, and if I'm taking their friends home -- is there a lunchbox? -- the last thing I'm thinking, really thinking about is my personal safety or my things being stolen," Nicole Perdue said.
The couple, married 10 years, feels safe in their quiet Houston neighborhood.
Next time you get in your car (if you have a GPS unit) scroll through the info stored.
You already know HOW to get home and how to get to major streets leading to your house when you're across town... why input the location of your house in your GPS? Who else is going to drive your car home? It would have to be an awfully trusted friend.

As the expert mentioned complacency from living for years in a relatively safe neighborhood leaves people to be careless against intrusion of their lives. Doors unlocked, SAFES unlocked :rolleyes: , alarm codes not set... so many things that we do without thinking about how easy it is for the thief who is in your home.

Pass this on to others on your FB and such. The security expert basically took his time because he already knew he had the time... real life burglars are going to be much quicker and much more destructive.
 

Kacey

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Jan 3, 2006
Messages
16,462
Reaction score
227
Location
Denver, CO
On the one hand, I understand what he's saying... on the other hand, I also keep my registration in my car, in case I need to show it to a LEO - and like most people, I keep it in my glove box. There are only so many places I can keep it and still get to it in case of a traffic stop. So a carjacker who gets into my car when I'm not present is going to find my address anyway... and if I'm present, it's on my license, which is in my wallet.

I have a friend who has always left her house open - and she was indeed robbed, as were several of her neighbors. However, unlike those same neighbors, whose homes were locked, she didn't have to pay for new door locks or windows broken in the commission of the crime - and she's okay with that. But she's always left her home open, and even after the burglary, she hasn't changed that - she tried, but after she locked herself out several times, she reverted.

I don't agree with her - I lock my house every time I leave - but at the same time, I understand what she's saying. She is refusing to live her life in fear of another burglary, and is likewise refusing to change her lifestyle based on that fear. How far should we let fear determine how we live our lives? And when will we stop letting fear determine how we live our lives, and find other solutions?
 

Thesemindz

Senior Master
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 26, 2003
Messages
2,170
Reaction score
103
Location
Springfield, Missouri
Discovery Channel has a show called "It Takes a Thief" where they have two rehabilitated burglars break into people's homes to demonstrate how easy it is, then they set the people up with high tech security and come back a few weeks later to try again.

It's pretty impressive how quickly these guys can get into someone's home. In seconds, they're inside, and no one outside would have any idea something was going on.


-Rob
 

Thesemindz

Senior Master
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 26, 2003
Messages
2,170
Reaction score
103
Location
Springfield, Missouri
I don't agree with her - I lock my house every time I leave - but at the same time, I understand what she's saying. She is refusing to live her life in fear of another burglary, and is likewise refusing to change her lifestyle based on that fear. How far should we let fear determine how we live our lives? And when will we stop letting fear determine how we live our lives, and find other solutions?

I had a more biting post written, but I chose not to be rude. Suffice it to say I disagree strongly with your friend's approach to her safety.

There's a difference between fear and sensibility. If I choose not to engage in unsafe behavior, it isn't out of fear. It's out of logical, sensible risk aversion.


-Rob
 

jks9199

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
23,428
Reaction score
3,729
Location
Northern VA
First... I'm not aware of any cases where someone used a GPS to backtrack to the owner for a burglary. Doesn't mean it can't happen, but as was pointed out -- there's plenty else in your car to lead back to you. Not to mention that most GPS thefts I've seen or worked have occurred while the car was parked at home.

Second... The person Kacey described is being irresponsible and foolish. Rather than take reasonable and basic steps to deal with the real possibility of burglary, they're claiming that by ignoring the risk, they aren't surrendering to "fear." Actually, they're letting that burglary shape their actions today... I'd love to tell every resident of my jurisdiction that it's safe to leave their doors unlocked. But the reality is that cops can't be everywhere all the time. Why not make it harder for someone to victimize you?
 

Sukerkin

Have the courage to speak softly
MT Mentor
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Sep 15, 2006
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
493
Location
Staffordshire, England
I can fully understand your professional point of view, JKS but I do have to say that the few times I've been locked out of my home (whether my parents house, rented house or those I've owned) it was absurdly easy to break in and give rise to no alarm whatsoever.

If a burgular wants 'in' then he/she is coming in, all you can do is slow them down or make them look elsewhere via technology and precautions (if you're not home at the time).

I've been burgled once and had an attempted break-in once.

The successful burglar got through the lock on the front door and disabled the (admittedly) rudimenatary alarm the landlord had fitted by the simple artifice of having been an ex-tenant who kept a copy of the key and remembered the code.

The unsuccessful one prised open the tack-welded metal window in the bathroom and was half way in before I scared him back out of the second floor window - he'd gotten there by climbing up the drainpipe that was supposedly coated with a security-substance too slippy to climb.

The only true defense is to have nothing worth stealing.
 

Kacey

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Jan 3, 2006
Messages
16,462
Reaction score
227
Location
Denver, CO
I had a more biting post written, but I chose not to be rude. Suffice it to say I disagree strongly with your friend's approach to her safety.

There's a difference between fear and sensibility. If I choose not to engage in unsafe behavior, it isn't out of fear. It's out of logical, sensible risk aversion.


-Rob

I never said I agreed with her - you'll note that I also said I always lock my own house - but at the same time, it's her life, to live as she chooses. One of the houses that was burgled on her block was occupied at the time, by an elderly relative visiting the home owner, who took the thieves' word that they were there to do contracted labor and went back into the room she was staying in... while the thieves emptied the house of all its valuables, save those in the guest room; thankfully, the elderly woman was not hurt. In the face of such brazenness.... do you really think locking the doors would keep them out?

I say again: How far should we let fear determine how we live our lives? And when will we stop letting fear determine how we live our lives, and find other solutions?

And I add: Why is the conversation focusing on my friend's choice, and not on the questions I asked? How will we change this problem, other than increasing the armor on our homes?
 

jks9199

Administrator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
23,428
Reaction score
3,729
Location
Northern VA
I can fully understand your professional point of view, JKS but I do have to say that the few times I've been locked out of my home (whether my parents house, rented house or those I've owned) it was absurdly easy to break in and give rise to no alarm whatsoever.

If a burgular wants 'in' then he/she is coming in, all you can do is slow them down or make them look elsewhere via technology and precautions (if you're not home at the time).

I've been burgled once and had an attempted break-in once.

The successful burglar got through the lock on the front door and disabled the (admittedly) rudimenatary alarm the landlord had fitted by the simple artifice of having been an ex-tenant who kept a copy of the key and remembered the code.

The unsuccessful one prised open the tack-welded metal window in the bathroom and was half way in before I scared him back out of the second floor window - he'd gotten there by climbing up the drainpipe that was supposedly coated with a security-substance too slippy to climb.

The only true defense is to have nothing worth stealing.
The essence of physical security is to make the potential target too much trouble and too likely to get caught to be worth the bother. US government safes for classified material are rated for how long they take to be penetrated by drilling or manipulation; physical checks are required in time periods less than that rating. The same principle applies to your house. Make it a harder target, and they'll go somewhere else. Or you'll catch 'em in the act.
 

chinto

Senior Master
Joined
Apr 18, 2007
Messages
2,026
Reaction score
38
well when hiking i carry a compass and map too for a reason. do not have a GPS in the car for that reason actually. a lot of people do not realize how easily things can be hacked.

I do not have a remote disarm on the security system for the same reason.
 
OP
MA-Caver

MA-Caver

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Aug 21, 2003
Messages
14,960
Reaction score
312
Location
Chattanooga, TN
well when hiking i carry a compass and map too for a reason. do not have a GPS in the car for that reason actually. a lot of people do not realize how easily things can be hacked.

Well it's like I said/asked... why would you want to put information that you are VERY familiar with ... i.e. knowing how to get home from a certain way point that's several miles away (favorite bar, gas station, store, etc.) without the benefit of it on the GPS.
It's foolish IMO to keep info on the GPS anyway... just type in where you want to go and then remember in the best GPS on the planet... your own mind to get you there from then on.
Usually I just need to travel one time and if I know I'm going back there again then I will make it a point to remember street names, familiar landmarks and etc. to get me there the next time I need to go.

But yeah... leaving your registration in the car is a must but even then it can be locked up or even put in a small lock-box under the seat... or something... hmm sounds like an invention is needed here. :rolleyes:
 

Guardian

Black Belt
Joined
Nov 11, 2007
Messages
635
Reaction score
23
Location
Wichita Falls, Texas
A little common sense will go along way, while I'm sure this can be used, I also haven't heard of it being a big deal around here, so while good to know, it's not high on the priority list of ways to ensure I'm not a victim of a thief, but as I stated, it's a nice tidbit to know. Thanks.
 

Zero

Master Black Belt
Joined
Dec 6, 2006
Messages
1,284
Reaction score
297
Just load into the GPS memory as "Home address" the local police station or jail.
 

Latest Discussions

Top