Why jui jitsu

TimApple

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I have been searching for schools, and actually was more interested in Karate, but it looks more and more like all the schools are McDojos. So I have this school near me.. Haanpaa Martial Arts | BJJ | Fitness Kick Boxing | Rockford which is BJJ. I was wondering if y'all could convince me to give it a go. I'm 51, and I'm not sure how my body would handle being thrown around. Furthermore, I also am attracted to kicking and punching, I'm in it for fun and exercise more than competing.. I like tradition also.

Nonetheless, this looks much more like the real thing than my choices of Karate Dojos... so feel free to preach to me.

Cheers!
 

Flying Crane

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Honestly, Im not interested in Convincing you of anything and I dont think anyone else should be, either. I will only say that you need to find a school that is a good fit for you, and that might be something entirely different from what is a good fit for me or for the next guy. So do some research, visit the school, take a couple of free or low-cost introductory classes so you can see what it is like, and then make a decision to join, or not. And if you join but later discover you dont like it, or it just isnt a good fit for you for some reason, look for something else.

People with experience in jiu jitsu can talk about what they like about it, or dont like about it, and that may or may not be relevant for you. Sort through the info. In the end, it is your choice.
 

MuayJitsu

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If you want to do it do it. But looking at that their kickboxing program is more of a fitness class. Meaning theyre not there to actually you how to hit or kick with real technique its just a fitness class its not there to teach you how to fight. Its better than nothing but if you are looking to learn how to strike effectively then that class wouldnt be great for that. Bjj is what it is. Some like it some hate it. Im in between I think its fun in some areas but tedious in others thats just my opinion though. Do it see if you like it and go from there
 

skribs

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In my opinion, martial arts is about finding the right balance between safety and realism for you.

There's a Taekwondo school near me that is incredibly safe, but incredibly unrealistic and has low expectations of its students. My Mom, at age 69, quit that school because she wasn't being challenged enough, and joined a cardio kickboxing class. However, if you are absolutely afraid of injury, this TKD school is a great school, because everything there is done super light and with no resistance. There's another Taekwondo school near me that has specifically said their classes are dangerous. I've avoided that school. The school I went to found a nice balance.

Right now I'm doing BJJ. There's very little slamming. Most people just pull guard, or do take-downs controlled. If you're worried about slams, I'd avoid Judo and Wrestling. But you're not going to get them very often in BJJ.
 

HighKick

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In my opinion, martial arts is about finding the right balance between safety and realism for you.

There's a Taekwondo school near me that is incredibly safe, but incredibly unrealistic and has low expectations of its students. My Mom, at age 69, quit that school because she wasn't being challenged enough, and joined a cardio kickboxing class. However, if you are absolutely afraid of injury, this TKD school is a great school, because everything there is done super light and with no resistance. There's another Taekwondo school near me that has specifically said their classes are dangerous. I've avoided that school. The school I went to found a nice balance.

Right now I'm doing BJJ. There's very little slamming. Most people just pull guard, or do take-downs controlled. If you're worried about slams, I'd avoid Judo and Wrestling. But you're not going to get them very often in BJJ.
Do you have any idea what makes the TKD school 'dangerous'?
 

swillis

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Jiu jitsu's main attraction for older people seems to be its relative lack of impact...I mean, the point is not to get hit in the head, at least. It's bound to happen accidentally but it's not the point. Very low injury rate compared to striking arts IMO
 

Dirty Dog

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Jiu jitsu's main attraction for older people seems to be its relative lack of impact...
Because there's no impact when you hit the floor. Nope.
I mean, the point is not to get hit in the head, at least. It's bound to happen accidentally but it's not the point. Very low injury rate compared to striking arts IMO
Based on what actual information? I've been practicing since 1968 or '69, primarily in TKD, and there are very few actual injuries.
Based on what people have posted here about injuries, I do not believe there is any significant difference. You're going to get bumps, bruises and sprains. Regardless of the art.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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I assume you are not interested in fighting at your age. So, if you train MA for health, you should consider what MA training can help you to live through your old age.

What will you do when you are 70 if you train:

- boxing?
- TKD?
- Kung Fu?
- wrestling?
- BJJ?
- ...

In my opinion, any MA system that emphasizes on kicking can help you to develop balance, flexibility, ... Not falling down during old age is important.

One day, you want to be like this.

old_man_front_kick.jpg


You don't want to be like this.

old_people_walk.png
 
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Cynik75

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Here is a slogan I want to have printed on my next gi: BJJ - FOR THE SAKE OF HEALTHY KNEES.

;)
 

dunc

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BJJ is generally good as you age because it gives you a good workout that extends your mobility without any knocks to the head
It also teaches you to fall safely and methods of standing efficiently
Other arts are probably better for developing flexibility and BJJ is quite taxing on the body so perhaps gentler styles will be good for much older folk
I know several BJJ folk that have continued to spar into their 60s and obviously its possible to train BJJ lightly as long as you train with folk your own age (or folk who get it)
 

Kung Fu Wang

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BJJ is generally good as you age because it gives you a good workout that extends your mobility without any knocks to the head
I assume a 70-year-old

- boxer may spend his daily training on shadow boxing or punching on heavy bag.
- Judo guy (or wrestler) may spend his daily training on solo throw drills or throw a throwing dummy.

What's a 70-year-old BJJ guy daily training look like (assume without training partner)?
 

dunc

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I assume a 70-year-old

- boxer may spend his daily training on shadow boxing or punching on heavy bag.
- Judo guy (or wrestler) may spend his daily training on solo throw drills or throw a throwing dummy.

What's a 70-year-old BJJ guy daily training look like (assume without training partner)?
Why solo training?
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Why solo training?
- You may not have training partner all the time.
- Your training partner may pass away.
- All your students may not be with you anymore.
- You may retire in an area that nobody trains MA there.
- ...

The day when you knock on your next-door neighbor and ask him if he is willing to spar/wrestle with you, you may know what I'm talking about. You will find out that nobody around you are interested in MA besides yourself.
 
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dunc

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- You may not have training partner all the time.
- Your training partner may pass away.
- All your students may not be with you anymore.
- You may retire in an area that nobody trains MA there.
- ...

The day when you knock on your next-door neighbor and ask him if he is willing to spar/wrestle with you, you may know what I'm talking about. You will find out that nobody around you are interested in MA besides yourself.
There are solo drills etc, but you cant really train BJJ on your own
However, there are a lot of academies around and they do provide a wonderful community for people which has a lot of benefit for folks as they age
 

Kung Fu Wang

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you cant really train BJJ on your own
MA training include 4 parts:

- develop (partner drill),
- test (sparring/wrestling),
- polish (solo form/drill training),
- enhance (weight/punching bag training).

I do agree that you cannot "develop" or "test" MA on your own. You can only "polish" and "enhance" MA on your own.
 

swillis

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Because there's no impact when you hit the floor. Nope.

Based on what actual information? I've been practicing since 1968 or '69, primarily in TKD, and there are very few actual injuries.
Based on what people have posted here about injuries, I do not believe there is any significant difference. You're going to get bumps, bruises and sprains. Regardless of the art.
Obviously BJJ, judo and wrestling arts can result in impact, yes. I've trained a lot more BJJ than any impact sports, and nothing compared to your experience-- I guess the easiest support for my point is that in BJJ we seem to have more control over impact to our partner when standing than striking, but I say that as a BJJ guy rather than a boxer or TKD practitioner. What do you think? If someone is training boxing and getting hit, wouldn't that probably lead to more injury than BJJ? Just educated conjecture. I'm eager to hear your thoughts.
 

Hot Lunch

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Nonetheless, this looks much more like the real thing than my choices of Karate Dojos... so feel free to preach to me.
Watch Joe Rogan, Ryan Michler, or Joe Rogan if you need to be preached to about that. Because no matter what you choose, it's no skin off anyone else's back.
 
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